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Noirvember Challenge - Page 3

post #101 of 172


6. Detour (from the NYT link above)
post #102 of 172

LOOOOVE Detour. Ann Savage is so great in that movie.

LIST! Who are your favorite femme fatales? Here's mine:

1) Stanwyck, Double Indemnity
2) Gene Tierney, Leave Her to Heaven (I think that's noir through and through, even with the Technicolor)
3) Savage, Detour
4) Kathleen Turner, Body Heat

5) I haven't seen Woman in the Window yet, but Joan Bennett kills in Scarlet Street

post #103 of 172

Does Martha Vickers in The Big Sleep count?

 

"She tried to sit on my lap while I was standing up."

post #104 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

LOOOOVE Detour. Ann Savage is so great in that movie.

LIST! Who are your favorite femme fatales? Here's mine:

1) Stanwyck, Double Indemnity
2) Gene Tierney, Leave Her to Heaven (I think that's noir through and through, even with the Technicolor)
3) Savage, Detour
4) Kathleen Turner, Body Heat

5) I haven't seen Woman in the Window yet, but Joan Bennett kills in Scarlet Street

 

I'm all about Gene Tierney and Peggy Cummins, but Kim Morgan turned me on to the awesomeness of PHANTOM LADY and Ella Raines' performance

 

Sexy Dirty Drum Boogie: Phantom Lady

 

http://sunsetgun.typepad.com/sunsetgun/2013/01/because-ive-taken-most-of-january-off-revisiting-phantom-lady-theres-a-dangerous-sexuality-to-film-noir-thats-hard-to.html

post #105 of 172

Thanks to Fat Elvis' earlier link, I watched:

 

 

 

This was honestly a big disappointment. A great cast (Denver Pyle was in there somewhere, can't recall which character he was), an interesting premise, but the film felt like an extended Perry Mason episode. (The TV production values didn't help.) It also didn't help that the Amazon Prime transfer is pretty bad. Both this and "D.O.A." are begging to be remade.

 

In order of preference:

 

1) Out of the Past

2) The Asphalt Jungle

3) The Long Goodbye

4) Scarlet Street
5) D.O.A.

6) Please Murder Me!

post #106 of 172
Thread Starter 

10. THEY LIVE BY NIGHT -  Nicholas Ray assured splash of a debut. A teenage love story by way of crime Noir. There's a gentle, earthy charm and easy chemistry to/with the two leads.

 

One of the most romantic Noirs. A pair of damaged souls desperately clinging to each other; a one dream to escape to Mexico and away from the outlaw life. Alas, in this type of tale, there's no making it out alive. 

 

There's compassion in Ray's touch and a humanist streak that makes this- as doomed as this love is - one of the few Noirs that doesn't feel mean or overwhelming by the slipping into darkness.

(Loosely remade by Altman in his 70's run as THIEVES LIKE US)

 

 

Noir Dialogue to Savor:

 

"Fifteen hundred bucks foe a second hand car?"

"That's right."

"Whoever sells them for that, that's worse than robbin' a bank!"

"They're thieves - just like us."

post #107 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

Thanks to Fat Elvis' earlier link, I watched:





This was honestly a big disappointment. A great cast (Denver Pyle was in there somewhere, can't recall which character he was), an interesting premise, but the film felt like an extended Perry Mason episode. (The TV production values didn't help.) It also didn't help that the Amazon Prime transfer is pretty bad. Both this and "D.O.A." are begging to be remade.

In order of preference:

1) Out of the Past
2) The Asphalt Jungle
3) The Long Goodbye
4) Scarlet Street

5) D.O.A.
6) Please Murder Me!
Hasnt D.O.A. been remade?

With Quaid and Ryan?

Or do you mean remade again?

And btw, how IS the remake, any fans here?
post #108 of 172

Top 5 Femme Fatales: 
 

1. Jane Greer as Kathie Moffat in Out of the Past

2. Gene Tierney as Ellen Berent Harland in Leave Her To Heaven

3. Barbara Stanwick as Phyllis Dietrechson in Double Indemnity 

4. Rosamund Pike as Amy Elliott Dunne in Gone Girl 

5. Gaby Rogers as Lily Carver in Kiss Me Deadly

post #109 of 172

The DOA remake is very '80s, made by the same team that created Max Headroom. Quaid and Ryan have great chemistry but little opportunity to indulge it. There's also a dynamically-staged sequence with a nail-gun. There is a neat gimmick where the color gradually leaches from the image throughout the running time as the poison gains its grip on Quaid, which must have been hell to achieve in pre-digital days.

post #110 of 172
Thread Starter 

11. ZODIAC (Director's Cut) - Not only Fincher's best film, but maybe the masterpiece of 2007. Film takes the paranoid intensity and unease of ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN to level 11, creating a tone not far off from the darkest Noir, while at times flirting with full on Horror. Brilliant needle drops create a sense of time and place and accent this mood.  (Holy shit, "Hurdy Gurdy Man"!) Obsession consumes the multiple protagonists, and this obsession is something we the audience feel as we follow them down the rabbit hole. Stellar cast. Even though Gyllenhaal was knocked as somewhat of a weak link at the time, I find myself admiring his performance more and more with each viewing. A great everyman driven to the brink of madness (There's more than one way to lose your life to a killer).  And Ruffalo is just awesome.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor:

 

"Just because you can't prove it doesn't mean it isn't true."

"Easy, Dirty Harry"

post #111 of 172

I saw the DOA remake in theaters, and my primary memory of it is that nail gun sequence. I'd love to see it remade by one of the South Korean stylists, a Chan Wook Park or Kim Jee-Woon. Please Murder Me had an equally nifty premise but is undercut by the uninspiring filmmaking.

Zodiac is so damn good, and any mention of it makes me want to watch it again, but i think we've pretty much obliterated the definition of "noir" at this point.

post #112 of 172

Yeah, Zodiac is 70s paranoid thriller/procedural. Not noir. C'mon. 

post #113 of 172
Yeah. Before anybody watches anymore films, they should have to read Paul Schrader's "Notes on Film Noir" (not a definite text, but a great introduction to critical conversation about noir as a cinematic category).

Anyhoo, I watched CRISS CROSS. Now *that's* a noir. One of the best movie endings I've ever seen.
post #114 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

I saw the DOA remake in theaters, and my primary memory of it is that nail gun sequence. I'd love to see it remade by one of the South Korean stylists, a Chan Wook Park or Kim Jee-Woon.

 

Oh yes, this.

post #115 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Yeah, Zodiac is 70s paranoid thriller/procedural. Not noir. C'mon. 

 

Can procedurals and noirs intercept?

 

(DETECTIVE STORY??)

 

I agree ZODIAC isn't pure Noir, but I felt it had such a great darkness in the city vibe that for my money puts it at least in same family.

post #116 of 172
Thread Starter 

And not to be argumentative, but as point of discussion, didn't the Paranoid Thriller pretty much directly evolve from Noir? I mean, I feel like there's a genre throughline back to something like KISS ME DEADLY.

 

(sometimes with something like NIGHT MOVES, both genres directly come together)


Edited by Fat Elvis - 11/18/16 at 2:09pm
post #117 of 172
Thread Starter 

ZODIAC: throughline from THE NAKED CITY and M.

post #118 of 172
As you yourself point out, being in the noir lineage and actually being noir are different things.

(Again, I'm a stickler for a strict definition of noir.)
post #119 of 172
Thread Starter 

Just read someone define Noir as "a style or genre of cinematographic film marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, and menace" which is pretty close to what my own personal definition has always been.

post #120 of 172
If that's the definition, noir becomes a fairly meaningless label.
post #121 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

Just read someone define Noir as "a style or genre of cinematographic film marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, and menace" which is pretty close to what my own personal definition has always been.


By this definition Ingmar Bergman and Lars Von Trier are the best noir directors of all time. That seems way too broad.

#7

 

A very good movie made great by John Alton's cinematography. I'll remember the compositions in this movie long after the plot. Absolutely gorgeous.

 

In order of preference:

1) Out of the Past
2) The Asphalt Jungle
3) The Long Goodbye
4) Scarlet Street

5) The Big Combo
6) D.O.A.
7) Please Murder Me!

post #122 of 172
Thread Starter 

Wikipedia on the problem of definition:

 

 

"The questions of what defines film noir, and what sort of category it is, provoke continuing debate. "We'd be oversimplifying things in calling film noir oneiric, strange, erotic, ambivalent, and cruel […]"—this set of attributes constitutes the first of many attempts to define film noir made by French critics Raymond Borde and Étienne Chaumeton in their 1955 book Panorama du film noir américain 1941–1953 (A Panorama of American Film Noir), the original and seminal extended treatment of the subject. They emphasize that not every film noir embodies all five attributes in equal measure—one might be more dreamlike; another, particularly brutal. The authors' caveats and repeated efforts at alternative definition have been echoed in subsequent scholarship: in the more than five decades since, there have been innumerable further attempts at definition, yet in the words of cinema historian Mark Bould, film noir remains an "elusive phenomenon […] always just out of reach"."

post #123 of 172

My definition of Noir is "Everyone smokes and the girl dies."

post #124 of 172


The Postman Always Rings Twice (first time)
post #125 of 172
post #126 of 172
Thread Starter 

10 Dark Gems to Get You Hooked on Film Noir

 

http://nerdist.com/10-dark-gems-to-get-you-hooked-on-film-noir/

post #127 of 172
Thread Starter 

Q: what was the very first Noir? I read someone say CITIZEN KANE, but I've always leaned towards HIGH SIERRA.

post #128 of 172
HIGH SIERRA feels right. Certainly, 1941 is the year that noir came into being (MALTESE FALCON came out in October '41).

KANE has a strong noir feel, but it's not a noir in the classic sense, so it doesn’t make sense to consider that film noir's beginning.
post #129 of 172
Does Fritz Lang's M count?
post #130 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

Does Fritz Lang's M count?

 

TICR. 

Calling Kane noir? We have gotten way, way, way, way, way away from what's "noir." 

post #131 of 172
I googled TICR but I couldn't find anything that told me what that acronym means..
post #132 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I googled TICR but I couldn't find anything that told me what that acronym means..

Haha.. I did the same thing..

"Training in Clinical Research"

...


I don't need to be trained in that to know Kane ain't Noir.
post #133 of 172

It's a law school term, sorry. It stands for "this is the correct response."

post #134 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

Does Fritz Lang's M count?
It's an important antecedent of noir by one of its greatest directors, but, no. It's pre-noir.
post #135 of 172
Well...regardless, I just LOOOVE M. Anybody who's never seen it should make that a priority.

Only movie I've ever seen that was filmed in Tall Screen..
post #136 of 172
Oh, I love it, too. It's "top ten greatest films" material.
post #137 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

Only movie I've ever seen that was filmed in Tall Screen..

 

Check out Ida from a couple years ago. It's brilliant, compositionally and otherwise.


Edited by Hammerhead - 11/21/16 at 2:09pm
post #138 of 172
Thread Starter 

The Nitrate Diva: "The more film noir I watch, the more convinced I become that it's the key to understanding America."

post #139 of 172


(first time) had to turn this off because the copy was bad. Couldn't find a better one. Now trying out Elevator to the Gallows. Have had the album Miles Davis did for it now doing the film for the first time.


Edited by Call Me Roy - 11/22/16 at 6:31am
post #140 of 172

M is really, really, really, really great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post



(first time)

Cool! Let us know what you think.

I've pretty much dropped the ball this month. Trump's election was (and remains) a downer. I hope to at least get to 10 before the month is out.

post #141 of 172
Had to turn off Touch of Evil because the copy was bad.

Watched Elevator to the Gallows and, holy shit, loved, loved, loved it.

I now have a have crush on Jeanne Moreau.

The Miles Davis soundtrack, a lonely trumpet that plays while Moreau wanders Paris' rain-soaked streets will get in your head.

This film is incredible.
post #142 of 172

(first time)
post #143 of 172


(first time)
post #144 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post


(first time)

I watched Scarlett Street, made after this by the same cast and director. How is it?

post #145 of 172

I think it's even better.

post #146 of 172
The Woman in the Window is real good.

Elevator to the Gallows had me transfixed.

On a mission to watch more Louis Malle.
post #147 of 172
Thread Starter 

Ida Lupino, a Woman of Spine on Both Sides of the Lens

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/24/movies/ida-lupino-a-woman-of-spine-on-both-sides-of-the-lens.html?_r=0

 

"Of all the actresses associated with film noir, Ida Lupino (1918-1995) seems the most complex. Ms. Lupino could be as sultry and sassy as Lauren Bacall while projecting an aching vulnerability. As world-weary as Gloria Grahame, she never came across as fragile, particularly in her subsequent work as a director.

 

In “Road House” (1948) and “On Dangerous Ground” (1952), both new on Blu-ray (from Kino Lorber and Warner Archive), Ms. Lupino is one tough waif. In each movie, she plays a character with obvious strengths and poignant weaknesses — a solitary seen-it-all lounge singer in “Road House” and an isolated blind woman in “On Dangerous Ground.”

 

Both characters defend themselves against overbearing men: Richard Widmark’s volatile nightclub owner in “Road House” and Robert Ryan’s violent cop in “On Dangerous Ground.” These actors were reprising the psychopaths they played in previous movies, yet in each case Ms. Lupino’s character prevails."

post #148 of 172

#8

 

Pickup on South Street (1953)

 

 

I love Sam Fuller's uniquely lurid tone. Richard Widmark is awesome, Thelma Ritter kills it, and Jean Peters is a dame's dame. Still, in terms of tawdry Cold War noirs, this doesn't hold a candle to Kiss Me Deadly for me, but this is still well worth seeing.

 

In order of preference:

1) Out of the Past
2) The Asphalt Jungle
3) The Long Goodbye

4) Pickup on South Street
5) Scarlet Street

6) The Big Combo
7) D.O.A.
8) Please Murder Me!

post #149 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

#8

Pickup on South Street (1953)




I love Sam Fuller's uniquely lurid tone. Richard Widmark is awesome, Thelma Ritter kills it, and Jean Peters is a dame's dame. Still, in terms of tawdry Cold War noirs, this doesn't hold a candle to Kiss Me Deadly for me, but this is still well worth seeing.

In order of preference:


1) Out of the Past

2) The Asphalt Jungle

3) The Long Goodbye
4) Pickup on South Street

5) Scarlet Street
6) The Big Combo

7) D.O.A.

8) Please Murder Me!

That and T-Men are on my list next.

Seriously, watch Elevator to the Gallows. I need to talk with someone about it.
post #150 of 172
Thread Starter 

12. THE ADVENTURES OF FORD FAIRLANE - (I'm including this just to make Rath's head explode) It's Joel Silver's THE BIG SLEEP

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor:

 

"Foooord ...we just needed to be held!"

 

"You got the bonus plan."

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