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Noirvember Challenge - Page 2

post #51 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post

 

"Neither do I, baby, but I have to I'm gonna die last." 

Jane Greer walking into the bar for the first time is one of those film images that is burned onto my brain.

The whole script is a primer in hard-boiled dialogue. Interestingly, according to Ebert, the person credited with the script didn't write any of it!

 

Quote:
 Film noir is known for its wise-guy dialogue, but the screenplay for "Out of the Past" reads like an anthology of one-liners. It was based on the 1946 novel Build My Gallows High by "Geoffrey Homes," a pseudonym for the blacklisted Daniel Mainwaring, and the screenplay credit goes to Mainwaring, reportedly with extra dialogue by James M. Cain.

 

But the critic Jeff Schwager read all versions of the screenplay for a 1990 Film Comment article, and writes me: "Mainwaring's script was not very good, and in one draft featured awful voice-over narration by the deaf-mute. Cain's script was a total rewrite and even worse; it was totally discarded. The great dialogue was actually the work of Frank Fenton, a B-movie writer whose best known credit was John Ford's 'Wings of Eagles.'"

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr Majestyk View Post
 

It's a scientific fact that The Hot Spot is the best film noir made since the fifties, they proved it at CERN last year. If someone hasn't seen it I urge you to track it down. It's wonderful.

I'm definitely going to check it out, but if it's better than Blood Simple I'll eat my hat.

post #52 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

I love JACKIE BROWN, but if that qualifies as "noir," then "noir" means nothing.

 

Why?

 

I consider JACKIE Blaxploitation Noir. I feel like there's a hard-boiled throughline. And Sam Jackson is such a classic noir antagonist.

 

This revisit I was reminded of THE KILLING> De Niro was like a mix of Timothy Carey and Elisha Cook. And Bridget was like a surfer stoner Marie Windsor.

post #53 of 172
JACKIE BROWN might have the structure and some hardboiled tropes, but, in spiritual essence, JACKIE BROWN is far from the scalding, existential ferocity of true noir. It's too amiable.
post #54 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

JACKIE BROWN might have the structure and some hardboiled tropes, but, in spiritual essence, JACKIE BROWN is far from the scalding, existential ferocity of true noir. It's too amiable.

 

this

jackie brown has what amounts to a happy ending

Also, when thinking about contemporary noir-influenced pictures, what about Nightcrawler? Yes, Bloom never gets his, but there's a ferocity and raw blackness at the heart of that picture that has stayed with me.

post #55 of 172
Thread Starter 

I see y'all's point about the happy ending, but I think there is a 'existential ferocity'' with Pam Grier's predicament and arc.

post #56 of 172
Thread Starter 

Out next week:

 

 

Strong recommendation.

post #57 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

I see y'all's point about the happy ending, but I think there is a 'existential ferocity'' with Pam Grier's predicament and arc.
To a degree. But stylistically, there's nothing noirish about JACKIE BROWN.

If you have to squint a bit to see the noirishness of a movie, it ain't noir. It's just a flick with some noir elements.
post #58 of 172
Thread Starter 

3. THE LONG GOODBYE  (DVD) -  since this film has achieved classic status it's forgotten how divisive it was initially. Chandler fans were furious at Elliott Gould's interpretation of Marlowe. Now his take is appreciated as kind of genius, but at the time purists were appalled at the very idea. Adapted by THE BIG SLEEP's Leigh Brackett, it was radical to put Marlowe in 60's hangover L.A.. Altman deftly creates a mood of stoned melancholy, with a sharp wry sense of humor that makes it a hangout -until a final act that gets as dark as any vintage Noir. I'm always haunted by the matter of fact surrender of Sterling Hayden's death.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor:

 

"Nobody cares but me."

"Well that's you, Marlowe. You'll never learn, you're a born loser."

 "Yeah, I even lost my cat."

 

Oh, and the coke bottle incident is still as shocking a sudden burst of violence as anything in genre cinema. In a way anticipates the cutting off the ear moment in RESERVOIR DOGS.

post #59 of 172

#2

 

Scarlett Street (1945)

 

 

Robinson, Bennett ("Lazylegs"!) and Duryea are terrific, and the ending is haunting.

 

Lines to savor:

"Is he a phony?"
"He's too *dumb* to be a phony!"


In order of preference:

 

1) Out of the Past

2) Scarlet Street

post #60 of 172

In my head, I always confuse Scarlet Street with Hangover Square, which is what I describe as "British noir-ish." Hangover is notable because it's a) good and b) the score by Bernard Herrmann later influenced Sondheim's Sweeney Todd. It was the last picture of the great underrated actor Laird Cregar, who is also fantastic in I Wake Up Screaming, another underrated noir picture.

post #61 of 172
Thread Starter 

Hey, Rath: do you like INHERENT VICE? It's probably my favorite movie of the decade. Definitely my most watched. Has the same stoned Noir vibe as THE LONG GOODBYE and the fascinating 60's hangover feel of CISCO PIKE.

post #62 of 172

#3

Fat Elvis inspired me:

 

Still greatly enjoy this, especially Gould's performance and Altman's constantly moving camera. Tarkovsky, Shmarkovsky; Altman's use of the camera was as distinctive and innovative as any filmmaker ever.

In a perfect world, every movie's soundtrack would just be a theme song remade in 20 different genres.

 

In order of preference:

 

1) Out of the Past

2) The Long Goodbye

3) Scarlet Street

post #63 of 172
Thread Starter 

The Mr. Peel look at Robert Aldrich's KISS ME DEADLY

 

http://mrpeelsardineliqueur.blogspot.com/2011/02/never-mind-about-evil.html

 

"The dynamic of Mike and Velda is just one of many things I think about as I watch Robert Aldrich’s now-legendary KISS ME DEADLY and lately I’ve gotten in the habit of making it my go-to movie to put on when it’s very, very late as if there’s some hidden revelation within its mysteries that I’ll only be able to discover at that hour. By this point I’m not even sure that the movie would make any sense to me if I watched it before midnight, let alone during the day and that’s probably the way it should be with noir. At its best, most potent, the vibe films like this can exude as they seep down into you, never releasing it’s grip as you spend just a little too much time imagining yourself as Mike Hammer driving over to Velda’s for a few minutes in his snazzy convertible. The film is ideal for such a late hour anyway, with that Nat “King” Cole number drifting out of Mike’s car radio in the darkness and the frantic attempts by Cloris Leachman’s Christina Bailey to catch her breath over the opening credit crawl. I’d rather have the blues than what I’ve got, goes the song which is heard again later on as Mike starts to do some hard drinking…and by the film’s end there’s little doubt that Mike Hammer would rather have anything than the world he’s stumbled into, one beyond even his hard-boiled sleuthing abilities. Mike Hammer never seems to have the answer to what he’s looking for just as I don’t quite know what I’m looking for when I watch this movie yet again. I just know that a world without KISS ME DEADLY would be a real cause of the blues."

post #64 of 172

From my limited viewing, my favorite noir would be either Kiss Me Deadly, Chinatown or, as of a few days ago, Out of the Past.

post #65 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

3. THE LONG GOODBYE  (DVD) -  since this film has achieved classic status it's forgotten how divisive it was initially. Chandler fans were furious at Elliott Gould's interpretation of Marlowe. Now his take is appreciated as kind of genius, but at the time purists were appalled at the very idea. Adapted by THE BIG SLEEP's Leigh Brackett, it was radical to put Marlowe in 60's hangover L.A.. Altman deftly creates a mood of stoned melancholy, with a sharp wry sense of humor that makes it a hangout -until a final act that gets as dark as any vintage Noir. I'm always haunted by the matter of fact surrender of Sterling Hayden's death.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor:

 

"Nobody cares but me."

"Well that's you, Marlowe. You'll never learn, you're a born loser."

 "Yeah, I even lost my cat."

 

Oh, and the coke bottle incident is still as shocking a sudden burst of violence as anything in genre cinema. In a way anticipates the cutting off the ear moment in RESERVOIR DOGS.

 

4. FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (VHS) - a direct response to the LONG GOODBYE backlash, this is Chandler played straight.

 

Ebert at the time: "These opening shots are so evocative of Raymond Chandler's immortal Marlowe, archtypical [sic] private eye, haunting the underbelly of Los Angeles, that if we're Chandler fans we hold our breath. Is the ambience going to be maintained, or will this be another campy rip-off? Half an hour into the movie, we relax. Farewell, My Lovely never steps wrong...in the genre itself there hasn't been anything this good since Hollywood was doing Philip Marlowe the first time around. One reason is that Dick Richards, the director, takes his material and character absolutely seriously. He is not uneasy with it, as Robert Altman was when he had Elliott Gould flirt with seriousness in The Long Goodbye. Richards doesn't hedge his bet."

 

Mitchum is brilliant as the older burnt out Marlowe. Push come to shove, it's my favorite take. And I worship Bogie.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor: "She gave me a smile I could feel in my hip pocket."

post #66 of 172
I have FAREWELL, MY LOVELY as a DVD import. Really underrated.
post #67 of 172
How is Michael Winner's The Big Sleep?

And anyone know why he changed the locale to England?
post #68 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

How is Michael Winner's The Big Sleep?
Bad.
post #69 of 172


1. 8 Million ways to Die (first time)
2. Red Rock West (first time)
post #70 of 172
Thread Starter 

The Mr. Peel look at John Frankenheimer's film of 52 PICK-UP, 30 years old today.

 

http://mrpeelsardineliqueur.blogspot.com/2013/11/longer-than-shes-been-alive.html

post #71 of 172

#4

 

 

I vaguely recall seeing the Dennis Quaid remake in theaters, but had never seen the original. I wish the movie had been as good as it's premise. O'Brien's performance is excellent, but the first half of the movie (after the great opening scene) is rather dull. Also, that moment where O'Brien is walking around and looking at ladies while a slide whistle plays on the soundtrack . . . Oof.

 

In order of preference:

 

1) Out of the Past

2) The Long Goodbye

3) Scarlet Street
4) D.O.A.

post #72 of 172
Thread Starter 

I think Ebert liked the Quaid D.O.A. remake. I kinda do, too.

post #73 of 172


State of Grace (first time)
post #74 of 172
Thread Starter 

5. THE BIG HEAT - My first exposure to Glenn Ford was playing Superman's kind-hearted adoptive dad. He was kind of corny. I never would've guessed he could pull off such a hard-boiled edge like he does in this. Along with his outlaw turn in 3:10 TO YUMA, I was convinced of that edge and became something of a fan.

 

A favorite Fritz Lang, it's directed with a masterful touch. It may be his best Noir.

 

There's a simmering rage in not just the lead performance by Ford, but with the film itself. It pretty much invents the (rogue) Cop genre.

 

Lee Marvin is fantastic as a slimy, cruel bastard. Coffee moment almost as the shock of the coke bottle surprise in LONG GOODBYE.

 

However, like JACKIE BROWN, as melancholy as the ending is, there's the flicker of hope of a small victory in a fucked up world.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor: "I wouldn't touch anything of Vince Stone's with a ten foot pole."

post #75 of 172


4. Hell or High Water (first time)
post #76 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post



4. Hell or High Water (first time)

How was it? I plan on seeing that soon.

I haven't really been feeling noir-y the last couple of days, but I plan on catching up starting tonight.

post #77 of 172
It's real fucking good.
post #78 of 172
Wow. Yea, Hell or High Water was the goods.

From that opening shot of the teller walking to the bank.

And Jeff Bridges...

Excellent.
post #79 of 172


5. Cold in July (first time)
post #80 of 172

#5

 

The Asphalt Jungle (1950)

 

 

 

So damn good. I'm a sucker for "heist gone wrong" movies, and this is one of the best. (although Rififi is THE best.) John Huston's eye is remarkable; every shot is a great black and white photograph. Plus, the dialogue is superb:

"Crime is only a left-handed form of human endeavor."

 

In order of preference:

 

1) Out of the Past (I like this a smidge more than Asphalt, but it's close)

2) The Asphalt Jungle

3) The Long Goodbye

4) Scarlet Street
5) D.O.A.

post #81 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post



5. Cold in July (first time)

Cold in July is such a fucking weird movie. I like it, but man it felt like I was watching three completely different movies.
post #82 of 172

It takes some interesting turns, that's for sure. I really liked it and I've had plenty of opportunities to rewatch it, but I keep avoiding it b/c (and this is never a consistent reaction, as it depends on my mood and the movie) the "batting practice" video really disturbed me. It was obviously supposed to and I don't hold it against the film at all, but like the far more graphic rape scene in Irreversible, it's going to be something I fast forward through whenever I get around to seeing it again. 

post #83 of 172
Thread Starter 

6. THE BIG SLEEP (1946 Theatrical): Bogie and Becall! My second favorite Hawks hang out film. Bogie's take is definitely the coolest Marlowe. I love how nonchalant he is about every chick he runs into kind of digging him. Even the hot bookworm is DTF.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor: "..she tried to sit in my lap while I was standing up."

 

"Well, I can't tell till I've seen you over a distance of ground. You've got a touch of class, but, uh...I don't know how - how far you can go."

"A lot depends on who's in the saddle. Go ahead Marlowe, I like the way you work. In case you don't know it, you're doing all right."

 

"How do you like your brandy, sir?"

"In a glass."

post #84 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mr Majestyk View Post
 

It's a scientific fact that The Hot Spot is the best film noir made since the fifties, they proved it at CERN last year. If someone hasn't seen it I urge you to track it down. It's wonderful.

I'm definitely going to check it out, but if it's better than Blood Simple I'll eat my hat.

 

I definitely like it better than Blood Simple, but Virginia Madsen tips the balance on a lot of films where I should know better.

 

For my money, the best noir of the 90s is the oddly obscure After Dark, My Sweet.

post #85 of 172
Thread Starter 

7. BAD LIEUTENANT (1992) - this movie is my everything. One of the masterpieces of the 90's, and THE greatest Cop flick of all time. Abel Ferrara means more to me than Scorsese. Talk about existential ferocity! Keitel is amazing. His breakdown/ confession near the end is so nakedly raw it guts me.  The movie gets how being a cop -and livin' for the city as Stevie say -can slowly destroy the soul. Small vices lead to chasing a high; escalating self-destruction until in full downward spiral near impossible to pull out from. Addiction is a motherfucker. Still for Bad Lieutenant redemption might be possible through forgiveness.  A dark sermon. Profane yet righteous.

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor: "Show me how you suck a guy's cock"


Edited by Fat Elvis - 11/11/16 at 7:16pm
post #86 of 172
Thread Starter 

The Nitrate Diva: ""Sometimes the people who are never alone are the loneliest." ON DANGEROUS GROUND (1951) – noir's greatest story of redemption?"

 

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post #87 of 172
Thread Starter 

The Nitrate Diva: "NIGHT OF THE HUNTER: Not just a noirish fairy tale. Note the commentary on hypocrisy, mob mentality, shaming women, leaving kids vulnerable."

 

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post #88 of 172
Thread Starter 
post #89 of 172
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post #90 of 172
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post #91 of 172


The Late Show (first time)

1. 8 Million Ways to Die
2. Red Rock West
3. Hell or High Water
4. Cold in July
5. The Late Show


Goin at it slow, will try to catch up.
post #92 of 172
Thread Starter 

"Noirvember continues with another weird non-noir noir: 1960's hot-button "Never Take Candy from a Stranger"."

 

http://www.leonardpierce.com/blog/2016/11/12/noirvember-never-take-candy-from-a-stranger/

post #93 of 172
Thread Starter 

Noirvember Friday: It Always Rains on Sunday

 
 
 
"One of the most emotionally consuming yet eternally tempting traps people commonly fall into is living with the ‘what if’. Rather than make due with the cards that they have been dealt, they indulge in nostalgia of the opportunities that knocked on their proverbial doors but that, for a multitude of reasons, they failed to take advantage of. The ship has sailed and these people are left to wallow in the bitterness of what might have been. They could be to blame for not understanding what was right in front of them or perhaps they are victims of circumstances entirely out of their control. Teasing them even more so are the little reminders, visual cues or sounds that take them back to the period when they could have truly made something of themselves. Such is the lot of many a film noir protagonist, characters that all too often live with the consequences of unfortunate turn of events in their past or dubious decision making on their part."
post #94 of 172
Thread Starter 

A slight diversion from pure Noirvember, I watched two movies that play around with the Bogey persona and iconic statatus.

 

8./ 9. PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM + THE MAN WITH BOGART'S FACE -

 

in former, my favorite early (funny) period Woody, Bogie is god of cool and guardian angel.  Think Elvis to Clarence in QT's TRUE ROMANCE. Movie makes me want to completely redecorate with Bogie film posters. (ACROSS THE PACIFIC over the bed never not funny)

 

Noir Dialogue to Savor: "I never saw a dame yet that didn't understand a good slap in the mouth or a slug from a .45."

 

The latter isn't a good film, but it's such a goofy love letter to Bogie and the classics of film noir, I kind of love it. It's more my thing than DEAD MAN DON'T WEAR PLAID

 

(on YT)

 

Noir Dialogue To Savor: "Dana Andrews was swell in "Laura," but what if Bogart had played Lt. MacPherson? Yeah, Bogart... smoking a cigarette and looking up at that portrait, thinking Laura was dead, but still in love with her. What a love scene. And neither of them naked!"

post #95 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post



The Late Show (first time)

1. 8 Million Ways to Die
2. Red Rock West
3. Hell or High Water
4. Cold in July
5. The Late Show


Goin at it slow, will try to catch up.

 

I hope you liked THE LATE SHOW. It's Screwball Noir! A favorite. Art Carney had this late period awesome run. I LOVE his chemistry with Tomlin.

post #96 of 172
Thread Starter 

Watch These Moody Film Noir Classics on Amazon Prime

Moody black-and-white photography, bad girls out to take morally flexible men to the cleaners — such are the trappings of film noir. A fair number of top-shelf noir films have made their way to Amazon Prime. Here are some of the best:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/watching/lists/streaming-film-noir-where-to-watch?login=email&smid=tw-nytmovies&smtyp=cur&join_watching_newsletter=true&newreg=true

 

<I'm curious about this one:

 

Please Murder Me!

"This 1956 thriller is structurally similar to “D.O.A.” It opens with a defense attorney (Raymond Burr, one year before playing another defense attorney, “Perry Mason,” on TV) speaking into a tape recorder, laying out how he expects to be murdered in one hour. He then tells the story of who will pull the trigger: a former client (Angela Lansbury) whom he successfully got acquitted, only to discover that she was guilty of the crime. Using himself as bait, he devises a complex plan to get her to kill again. "

post #97 of 172
Thread Starter 

"Wherein I talk about Dick Richards's "Farewell, My Lovely" & why all Chandler adaptations fail Marlowe"

 

https://twitter.com/oldfilmsflicker/status/796356765315137537

 

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post #98 of 172
Thread Starter 

Film Noir Friday: Brute Force (1947)

 

https://canadiancinephile.com/2016/03/18/film-noir-friday-brute-force-1947/

 

"Jules Dassin’s Brute Force is among the most brutal of the films noir, with its iron clash between fascist violence and moral righteousness. The 1947 picture is based on a screenplay by Richard Brooks, which is based on a story by Robert Patterson. Dassin sinks his teeth into post-War America and finds blood in class warfare, where prisoners lock horns with authoritarian guards and long for freedom."

post #99 of 172
Thanks for that NY Times link Fat Elvis.. Always forget about Amazon Prime.

I did enjoy The Late Show, at first I thought it felt a bit tv movie then the plot picked up. And yes, the chemistry between the two stars was very noticeable, it felt as if Tomlin and Carney were even friends before filming.

You could even tell it was an Altman produced film in some ways. My gavorite line came from Tomlin to Steve

"This car is a toilet and you're the attendant."
post #100 of 172

Thanks for the link, Elvis . . . I've dropped the ball this past week. Luckily, I'm off work the next couple of days so I plan on catching up. "Please Murder Me" sounds fantastic.

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