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The All-Encompassing World News Thread - Page 8

post #351 of 358

That Gullen character in Philadelphia that Erdogan wanted Trump's people to kidnap and extradite probably really is someone who the CIA has had on the back burner for years, just in case the State Department ever decides that Erdogan needs to be overthrown. I've got nothing against the Turkish people and I love the Turkish soldiers I met in Afghanistan, but everything about our government's relationship with theirs is sordid.
post #352 of 358
Thread Starter 

A really good read on how Portugal has been successfully combating drug use, which had ballooned to a crisis in the 1980s:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/dec/05/portugals-radical-drugs-policy-is-working-why-hasnt-the-world-copied-it?CMP=share_btn_tw

 

A little backstory:

 

Quote:
The crisis began in the south. The 80s were a prosperous time in Olhão, a fishing town 31 miles west of the Spanish border. Coastal waters filled fishermen’s nets from the Gulf of Cádiz to Morocco, tourism was growing, and currency flowed throughout the southern Algarve region. But by the end of the decade, heroin began washing up on Olhão’s shores. Overnight, Pereira’s beloved slice of the Algarve coast became one of the drug capitals of Europe: one in every 100 Portuguese was battling a problematic heroin addiction at that time, but the number was even higher in the south. Headlines in the local press raised the alarm about overdose deaths and rising crime. The rate of HIV infection in Portugal became the highest in the European Union. Pereira recalled desperate patients and families beating a path to his door, terrified, bewildered, begging for help. “I got involved,” he said, “only because I was ignorant.”

 

A more caring approach:

 

Quote:

Pereira tackled the growing wave of addiction the only way he knew how: one patient at a time. A student in her 20s who still lived with her parents might have her family involved in her recovery; a middle-aged man, estranged from his wife and living on the street, faced different risks and needed a different kind of support. Pereira improvised, calling on institutions and individuals in the community to lend a hand.

 

In 2001, nearly two decades into Pereira’s accidental specialisation in addiction, Portugal became the first country to decriminalise the possession and consumption of all illicit substances. Rather than being arrested, those caught with a personal supply might be given a warning, a small fine, or told to appear before a local commission – a doctor, a lawyer and a social worker – about treatment, harm reduction, and the support services that were available to them.

 

The opioid crisis soon stabilised, and the ensuing years saw dramatic drops in problematic drug use, HIV and hepatitis infection rates, overdose deaths, drug-related crime and incarceration rates. HIV infection plummeted from an all-time high in 2000 of 104.2 new cases per million to 4.2 cases per million in 2015. The data behind these changes has been studied and cited as evidence by harm-reduction movements around the globe. It’s misleading, however, to credit these positive results entirely to a change in law.

 

Portugal’s remarkable recovery, and the fact that it has held steady through several changes in government – including conservative leaders who would have preferred to return to the US-style war on drugs – could not have happened without an enormous cultural shift, and a change in how the country viewed drugs, addiction – and itself. In many ways, the law was merely a reflection of transformations that were already happening in clinics, in pharmacies and around kitchen tables across the country. The official policy of decriminalisation made it far easier for a broad range of services (health, psychiatry, employment, housing etc) that had been struggling to pool their resources and expertise, to work together more effectively to serve their communities.

 

The language began to shift, too. Those who had been referred to sneeringly as drogados (junkies) – became known more broadly, more sympathetically, and more accurately, as “people who use drugs” or “people with addiction disorders”. This, too, was crucial.

 

Much, much more at the link.

post #353 of 358
Thread Starter 

Pretty wild story:

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-argentina-fernandez/argentinas-fernandez-charged-with-treason-judge-orders-arrest-idUSKBN1E11Q4?il=0&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=Social

 

Quote:
A federal judge in Argentina indicted former President Cristina Fernandez for treason and asked for her arrest for trying to cover up Iran’s possible role in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center that killed 85 people, a court ruling said. 
post #354 of 358
Thread Starter 

 

Update:

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/polands-ruling-party-moves-to-impose-its-will-on-supreme-court-1512763287?mod=e2tw

 

The lower chamber of Poland's parliament approved legislature to retire Supreme Court justices.

post #355 of 358
Thread Starter 

A synagogue is Gothenburg, Sweden has been firebombed.  Twenty masked individuals involved.  Jewish students were holding a party on the premises at the time:

 

https://twitter.com/AviMayer/status/939620097865519105

post #356 of 358

China is building refugee camps near the North Korean border in case of a crisis on the peninsula.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/11/world/asia/china-north-korea-border.html

post #357 of 358
Can I move there?
post #358 of 358

The article says they will try to have viable internet service at the camps so I guess that is a plus for Chewer relocation plans.

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