CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Focused Film Discussion › THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI - Pre-Release Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI - Pre-Release Thread

post #1 of 68
Thread Starter 

Oh hell yes.

 

post #2 of 68
Thread Starter 

 

I'm always game for new Martin McDonagh.  IN BRUGES is a masterpiece and SEVEN PSYCOPATHS, while imperfect, is a definite hoot. 

post #3 of 68
I agree. That trailer looks great as well.
post #4 of 68

Holy fuck, Frances McDormand is killing it in that trailer. Incredible supporting cast too.

post #5 of 68

Wow.

 

Knew nothing about this until now but it looks great, and I'm yet to watch a McDonagh movie I didn't enjoy.

post #6 of 68
I never say no to a McDonagh.

Looks fantastic.
post #7 of 68

wasn't a fan of seven psychopaths, but...

 

CAN'T WAIT

SO EXCITED

post #8 of 68

That

 

was

 

awesome!

post #9 of 68
By the way, that cast is fucking ridiculous. It is great to see McDormand get something that appears worthy of her.
post #10 of 68

So, where in Missouri should they rent or put up billboards to help promote this?

 

I found one candidate.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebb,_Missouri

 

There's an obvious problem, though.

post #11 of 68
I wonder why they use fictional towns in some movies and don't in others. I'm sure that a lot of different variables are at work when it comes to decisions like that but, overall, I've never understood it..
post #12 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

wasn't a fan of seven psychopaths, but...

CAN'T WAIT
SO EXCITED

I feel like Seven Psycopaths gets better with a second viewing. It really does help if youre not expecting more In Bruges, since Psycopaths is its own beast. Also its pretty hysterical.
post #13 of 68

How was the other McDonagh's War On Everyone

post #14 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post

How was the other McDonagh's War On Everyone

I made a thread about it. Its a complete 180 from his last film, but i thought it was pretty fun.
post #15 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post


I made a thread about it.

 

I'll take a look. Thanks!

post #16 of 68

Hugely positive reviews coming out of Venice for this - especially for McDormand and Rockwell, who's getting some of the best reviews of his entire career. Fuck yeah.

post #17 of 68

They should retitle this: That Movie You Get Excited About, Forget About, Then Get Excited About Again 

post #18 of 68
Any mook and their mook dog can do reaction videos to the trailers of $450 Billion summer blockbusters or uberpopular TV shows, but only the BEST reactors are real enough to take the time to react to a trailer for a new Martin McDonagh movie.

post #19 of 68
This is such a funny complex movie.

Going to be very interesting to talk about.
post #20 of 68
Would you say it's in line with In Bruge or Seven Psychopaths.
post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

This is such a funny complex movie.

Going to be very interesting to talk about.

Will the release ever widen? It's still not playing in my state. The Sean Hannity movie is, though.
post #22 of 68
there's a sean hannity movie??? HUH???

I wasn't big on seven psychopaths, so I'd say this feels more in line with In Bruges

As for its release date, I'd assumed it would be released wide by now. Usually if it's playing near me, it's essentially a wide release.
post #23 of 68
It’s going wider over Thanksgiving.
post #24 of 68
post #25 of 68

It's not nearly as funny as In Bruges, but I think it's pretty great.  What is definitely great are the performances from McDormand, Rockwell, Harrelson, Jones, and Shitstain from You're The Worst.

 

Weirdly, Dinklage is just okay.

post #26 of 68
Thread Starter 

Looks like this is indeed expanding today/this week.  We finally got it here in MN at a few select theaters.  We're going tonight.

post #27 of 68
Yup, it turned up down here as well. Looking forward to seeing it, I hope, on Sunday.
post #28 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

 

didn't Sorbo pretty much play that same character in GOD IS NOT DEAD or something?  hahaha

post #29 of 68
S-P-O-I-L-E-R-S! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! (Click to show)

Can not stress enough how this isn't what you think it is. And I couldn't be happier for such a surprise.

 

From the moment Sheriff Willoughby (a superb Woody Harrelson who I hope is not lost in the shuffle come Oscar nominations) matter-of-factly asks, "You know I have terminal cancer, right?" you are taken aback. It comes out of nowhere. Nothing to even slightly suggest that is where this story is headed. That exchange expresses how, as in real life, things are not black and white. They are grey. A lesser-film would take sides. Mildred (Frances McDormand in a career-best performance, and that's saying something) is right in her actions, everyone else is wrong and to Hell with all of them. Yes, I felt her anger, her pain. To lose a child is unspeakable – a wound that will never heal. Yet I, myself, instantly wondered, "Wait, you knew he's dying and you're still doing this?!"

 

I didn't know how to feel. That’s the point.

 

Multiple times during the film, it manages to subvert one's own expectations of where this is headed. You think you know where it's going and how you will view these characters from there on out and it masterfully manages to flip it. One scene (another sit-down between Mildred and Willoughby) comes to mind. They are at each others throats. Face to face, yelling. This is going to get ugly. Suddenly he coughs up blood in her face(!?!) They both freeze. His face drops, his eyes full of tear, "I… I didn't mean to" and she comforts him, softly reassures with "I know" and goes for help. These are two people who seconds ago hated each other. In that single moment, you understand they are people too. They have compassion and decency.

 

And that's just one sequence. Turns like that happen several times. But I am going to stop myself now. This is a story to experience for yourself and preferably a room full of people. To dissect and discuss the turn of events does a disservice to writer/director Martin McDonagh and his cast, excellent performances from top to bottom. Until you have seen it.

 

As with Wind River (my favorite film this year), this felt like a good book. A story that unravels before you. When it reaches its closing moments, you are left with questions, with feelings, with emotions. Not sure how to feel. Once again, that's the point


Edited by FilmNerdJamie - 11/24/17 at 9:29pm
post #30 of 68

Yeah, this is definitely one I'll need to mull over. Absolutely loved the last scene, though, and McDormand is a national treasure.

 

Jamie: Harrelson is great, but I'd bet the person who's gonna get the awards attention in that category is Rockwell. And he deserves it.

post #31 of 68

Loved the hell out of this. That one scene FilmNerdJamie mentioned hit me the same way. 

 

There are a couple other hall of fame scenes, too. But I don't want to get too spoiler heavy so early in the release.

post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by levrock View Post
 

Loved the hell out of this. That one scene FilmNerdJamie mentioned hit me the same way. 

 

There are a couple other hall of fame scenes, too. But I don't want to get too spoiler heavy so early in the release.

 

Seriously, Don't Read Until You've Seen the Film... (Click to show)
The scene where Willoughby's wife reads his letter... I balled out crying next to my wife. 
post #33 of 68
Warning: Ultra Mega Spoiler! (Click to show)
The last couple of scenes between McDormand and Rockwell are fucking great.

That phone call - the way Rockwell plays it with that single tear running down his face, the almost suicidal desperation on his part, and the way McDormand responds as they both latch onto the fact that even if this isn't the guy, this is a guy who's done some shit - it's a tremendous piece of acting and writing.

And then the final scene of them in the car - it's definitely that "ambiguous indie film ending", but those final lines are so well-written and delivered.

I will say my main caveat with the film is the Dinklage subplot. I guess it's there to show that she's too lost to ever connect with someone? But she's really not interested in Dinklage at any point throughout the film anyway.

Good movie.

post #34 of 68
hahaha during that ending I was going

"oh no! the movie is going to end here isn't it???"
post #35 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
  Warning: Ultra Mega Spoiler! (Click to show)
I will say my main caveat with the film is the Dinklage subplot. I guess it's there to show that she's too lost to ever connect with someone? But she's really not interested in Dinklage at any point throughout the film anyway.

Good movie.

See the Movie First, Then Read This, Blah Blah Blah! (Click to show)

The Dinklage was great. Had a genuine sweetness and sincerity to him. A lesser film would have resolved their thing. Ditto what happens to Willoughby's wife and small children. But that's not what it's about.

 

The moment that music started playing you knew that was the ending. Felt less indie film ending for me and more like a book ending.

post #36 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmNerdJamie View Post
  See the Movie First, Then Read This, Blah Blah Blah! (Click to show)

The Dinklage was great. Had a genuine sweetness and sincerity to him. A lesser film would have resolved their thing. Ditto what happens to Willoughby's wife and small children. But that's not what it's about.

 

The moment that music started playing you knew that was the ending. Felt less indie film ending for me and more like a book ending.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I mean, I thought their thing was resolved in that it definitely wasn't going to happen, and probably shouldn't. I thought where we left the wife and kids was fine too.

And yeah, the ending is very literary.
post #37 of 68

If I could hug a movie, I would hug THIS movie.

 

Just goddamn good. It ended EXACTLY where it needed to.  

 

Frances McDormand. Sam Rockwell. A character who's story takes such a turn and a lesser actor would have fucked it up, but not this actor. He made it not only believable, but touching and you ended up rooting for him.  A surprising partnership that also was believable. Maybe, tragic? 

 

Peter Dinklage's heartbreaking, "and I'M not a great catch?" speech. 

 

"Did Penelope really say 'beget'?"  - OMG. I don't think I've laughed so hard. The delivery of the line was pitch perfect.

 

God. What a movie.  

 

There's so much more to say about this film, but I need to get to work. And ruminate a bit more. Just let this movie rummage about my brain for a bit. 

post #38 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

hahaha during that ending I was going

"oh no! the movie is going to end here isn't it???"


My thought, too! 

post #39 of 68

BTW, I saw this at the Laemmle NOHO 7.  7PM showing and it was a PACKED house. This, Coco and Lady Bird were the busy movies of the day, according to the gal at the ticket booth.  

 

Very engaged audience, I might add. 

post #40 of 68
post #41 of 68
This was really terrific. It never goes where you think it's going to.

Although I wish it hadn't inflamed my fears about vindictive dentists.
post #42 of 68
Martin McDonagh is a genuine treasure. Frances McDormand is beyond praise.

As always, it's a bit unsettling seeing a McDonagh film, because they always surprise, they always challenge, and they are always funny and emotionally tough on their audience. Each and every film of theirs that I've seen has been honest and difficult, without ever being either maudlin or manipulative (although the doe came close, but it was earned).

The connection between a parent and child is holy, in the spiritual sense of the word. And this film examines the ramifications of losing that connection forever, with failure and regret and the persistent misery that comes with it. I loved Mildred's fury, I loved her determination, I loved her escalation (wise or not). I loved Red getting the orange juice for a piece of shit that didn't deserve it. I loved Dixon's humanity and my realization at why he was a piece of shit and a bully, and that he wanted to be better than that. I love Lester Freamon taking a country job after Baltimore. I loved Willoughby understanding.

This film was another McDonagh gem, and I hope it gets the attention it deserves. I hope Frances gets all the love.
post #43 of 68
The latest Pop Culture Happy Hour pretty roundly disliked this. First negative opinions I've heard on it, but they really had issues with it.
post #44 of 68

I can get into the headspace of somebody who dislikes this movie. It is a series of scenarios designed to challenge your assumptions about the characters on-screen. There is a point where that essentially becomes the movie's formula, and you're waiting for the turn in each scene to happen.

Arguably, not all of these moments are the most authentic in the world. Mildred's monologue to the priest comes off as something McDonagh just wanted to put in a screenplay, so why not this one. The dentist scene is kind of a preposterous way of reaffirming that Mildred's a badass. Etc.

If you're not grooving to the movie's wavelength, it could definitely come off as overly cute or "writerly" at times. If you're like me and loved the characters, every moment is a pleasure. It's like any movie - if you're not buying it, all of a sudden the seams are obvious.

post #45 of 68
Their objections were mostly around Rockwell's character getting what they saw as underserved sympathy and redemption and the racial aspects in general. Gene Demby said he hasn't hated a movie this much since Crash.
post #46 of 68
I think that's a really uncharitable reading, even under the assumption that redemption is what either lead is headed for.
post #47 of 68
They weren't seeing the movie the way that I did. He gets some degree of third act understanding (not quite sympathy), because we learn about his father, which clearly informs the audience that the character idolizes the Chief as a paternal surrogate. So he completely goes off the rails after the Chief dies. In the same way Mildred does, after months of inactivity regarding her daughters investigation. Keep in mind that Mildred isn't just acting out of righteousness, but a relatively deep well of guilt as well. We may not know all of Dixon's past history. It doesn't excuse his actions, but it may illuminate them.

Besides, every "grew up racist" southerner/midwesterner isn't a villain, regardless of what Hollywood may tell you. Most, some, many...struggle with the same griefs and personal failings everyone else does. If they hated it, they hated it because Dixon wasn't the stock villain they expected or (more likely) demanded. Are they mad his character had some (frankly, believable) growth, instead of persistent authorial judgement? Besides, Rockwell kills it on both sides of his character.
post #48 of 68

Here's a tweet from Demby that clarifies his feelings:

 

https://twitter.com/GeeDee215/status/936677427761307648

post #49 of 68
Such a great movie. I feel like I am never totally surprised by films anymore; yet, I had no clue where this film was heading at all. Such rich, complicated characters - two of them, filled with hate and anger, coming to an understanding of that feeling. Brilliant.

Also, shout out to the girl playing Penelope. Had me dying.
Edited by Doc Happenin - 12/2/17 at 6:31pm
post #50 of 68

Considering the current state of the country and the dialogue about angry white men, I really don't begrudge Demby's response to the film because I had some of those feelings during it too (similar to the glorification of tex-ass guns during the Ragnarok finale).

 

Rockwell's performance smooths it over for me.  It's a savvy bit of casting because I've seen the guy play an unrepentant racist psycho rapist before.  And he's a very likable screen persona.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Focused Film Discussion
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Focused Film Discussion › THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI - Pre-Release Thread