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The Leftovers Final Season

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 

I pretty much hate-watched the first season thinking it was all going to - finally! - make sense. Once I let go of my need for understanding I feel in love with the second season. Now, released of my burden to know anything, I'm game to see how it all turns out. My guess? Intensely. 


Edited by Ejoiner - 4/17/17 at 4:19am
post #2 of 38

Last season is only 8 episodes. We're in this deep, may as well see it through.

 

 

Right?

post #3 of 38

Was that person at the end supposed to be Liv Tyler?

post #4 of 38
Thread Starter 

I thought it was supposed to be the woman from the intro in 1844 but aged considerably. Same actress, right? 

post #5 of 38

It was Nora. 

post #6 of 38

Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't that an older version of Nora?

post #7 of 38

Yes, that was clearly Nora living as a woman named Sarah in a future coda. Essentially this show's "We have to go back!" scene. 

post #8 of 38

Thanks, that makes much more sense. 

post #9 of 38

OMFG, that new opening-title music. LOL.

post #10 of 38
Seems technology's taking a stance against Carrie Coon with this and Fargo.
post #11 of 38
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I thought you guys got the "future Nora" thing right - but now I'm thinking it was the leader of the Australian women's cult? And poor sheriff Kevin :eek:

post #12 of 38

My new "happy place" is Nora jumping on that trampoline. 

post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leto II View Post
 

OMFG, that new opening-title music. LOL.

 

The use of the Perfect Strangers song was brilliant throughout.  And I never thought the Wu-Tang symbol could break my heart, or that "The Jump-Off" could ever be this show's triumphant anthem.  This show is such a bizarre thing, and I will always find approximately 50% of it more preposterous than profound, but whenever it's Coon doing the lifting, every beat lands like a ton of bricks.

post #14 of 38

Speaking of, according to Alan Sepinwall, this episode's writing credits ("Tha Lonely Donkey Kong & Specialist Contagious") are Damon Lindelof and Tom Perotta after they plugged their names into a Wu-Tang Clan name-generator website.

 
post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leto II View Post
 

Speaking of, according to Alan Sepinwall, this episode's writing credits ("Tha Lonely Donkey Kong & Specialist Contagious") are Damon Lindelof and Tom Perotta after they plugged their names into a Wu-Tang Clan name-generator website.

 

 

Shit, do I love this show now?   I think I might love this show now.

post #16 of 38

Also I put myself in the Wu Tang generator, and I'm either Irate Ninja or Gentleman Wizard, depending on whether I use my full or nickname.

post #17 of 38
Thread Starter 

So...I guess the message is that religion is just a bunch of nonsense that crazy people tell themselves to give their lives meaning and gets people killed? Or something like that?

 

Also, another just beautifully acted and produced episode - Scott Glen sure earned his Australian vacation :)

post #18 of 38

I miss the season two opening song:

 

post #19 of 38

Last night's episode was an all-timer on the Batshit Crazy Scale.  I kind of loved it.  

post #20 of 38
Thread Starter 
Yes! Once you let go of any expectation of clarity or meaning - it's beautiful in it's batshit crazy. Just beautiful.
post #21 of 38
Thread Starter 

post #22 of 38

Someone on Reddit noticed this clue in the opening moments of the episode (the soon-to-be-buck-naked French sailor who launches the nuke):
 

Sy17iIo_9-OItimybafbjBqWY2mkkrNshedZh7t4i3I.jpg?w=1023&s=bb45e6d62b112441483357d0adfc0f79 

post #23 of 38

What, the name tag?  What's it supposed to be, a really lazy anagram for pylon? Not sure I get it....

post #24 of 38

"Lyon" = https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/56/84/7f/56847f89d1065e69cce987cd04b0dfad.jpg

post #25 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Woodward View Post
 

I miss the season two opening song:

 

 

Ugh, that was so on the nose I despised it.  Much prefer the rotating song choices for the individal eps.

post #26 of 38

I don't mind the changing tunes, but "Let The Mystery Be" was subversively upbeat and catchy. Season one's apocalyptic violin theme was the more obvious piece of music.


Edited by Barry Woodward - 5/19/17 at 4:48pm
post #27 of 38

This one was a little tough to watch just days after Chris Cornell.... 

post #28 of 38

Wow, this show. The most recent episode pretty much justifies for me watching the entire series.

 

I spent most of my life wrestling with the big questions. I was fascinated by existentialism from 14 years of age, and my outlook on life has never strayed too far from that perspective. Camus has always been my touchstone. The position I eventually arrived at was not very satisfying when it comes to the search for answers, but it was the one that made the most sense to me. Long story short, to me, we won't know the answers to the truly big questions ('where do we come from?', 'why are we here?') until we are dead. And we most likely won't find out anything then either. In the meantime, it is best to observe the golden rule and find a life that fulfills us and makes the world a better place. 

 

I have always been fascinated/repulsed by those who claim to have the answers. I always want to hear them out, because maybe there is something I missed in my own search for meaning, But time and time again, I came away either unsatisfied or angry. Because the answer usually involved handing over your self determination, your finances or both. 

 

Lindleof has always been one of those that annoyed me. I did not watch Lost, I saw the first episode and really did not like it. My wife was a huge fan and would often tell me about it, and I certainly saw all the hype around it. It seemed from the outside that people were generally dissatisfied with the way it wrapped up. After asking a host of interesting questions, it did not seem to answer them to the satisfaction of the audience. 

 

I then witnessed the mess that was Prometheus. This was a movie I was extremely excited about seeing, that had many incredible elements within, that ended up being a disjointed mess. Lindleof was an easy target for me to place the blame for the problems with the movie. But one of the main themes that was put forward was 'the answer is what you choose to believe'. This I think is a very valid outlook on the big questions.

 

So I come to the leftovers, the center of the story is a huge mystery that I don't think will be explained. The show has been filled with unreliable narration, insane people pursuing insane beliefs in response to their own broken condition. 

 

Ultimately, I see it as commentary on the world around us and the human condition in general. The more damaged we are, the more extreme lengths we will go to in order to achieve the closure we desperately need. All of this end of the world stuff, people want the end to make sense of their own suffering. People want their lives to be significant and their minds will bend to that desire. Whether it's Scott Glenn chanting to prevent the flood, or a governement fraud investigator committing certain suicide because she needs her own closure, or a therapist who abondons her live children due to the inexplicable loss of an unwanted pregnancy.

 

From episode one, the show seemed to be pushing as many emotional buttons as it could in order to jack up the audiences' agitation level to the maximum. But to see it culminate in the madness of this season has been amazing. 

 

Now I don't know what the showrunners intend to for the finale, I don't know if Kevin will rise from the dead, or if the world will be swept away by a flood, or aliens/angels will descend from the heavens on the 7 year anniversary. What I do know is that this last episode would serve quite well as the series finale in my eyes. What this episode said about the human condition really needed to be said. 

post #29 of 38

The penultimate episode was stellar. Strange, funny, and very moving. Surprised there aren't any reactions to it here.

 

I have no idea where Lindelof and Perrotta are taking the show with next week's finale, but I guess I've been saying that since the end of Season 1. It's been a wild ride and an absolute gem of a show.

post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiftyEyes View Post
 

The penultimate episode was stellar. Strange, funny, and very moving. Surprised there aren't any reactions to it here.

 

I have no idea where Lindelof and Perrotta are taking the show with next week's finale, but I guess I've been saying that since the end of Season 1. It's been a wild ride and an absolute gem of a show.

As near as I can tell the show is about our reaction to inexplicable tragedy. I have no idea how it will resolve, but that entire episode is open to interpretation as to what was actually occuring. We know that Kevin did not talk to that ladies kids in his hallucination/journey to the other side. So his intention was to sacrifice himself to alleviate the pain of others and he was willing to lie to accomplish that goal. Is that a condemnation of religeon or a celebration of it.....guess it depends on your own perspective. 

post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShiftyEyes View Post
 

The penultimate episode was stellar. Strange, funny, and very moving. Surprised there aren't any reactions to it here.

 

I have no idea where Lindelof and Perrotta are taking the show with next week's finale, but I guess I've been saying that since the end of Season 1. It's been a wild ride and an absolute gem of a show.

The ending line of dialogue in this past episode seemed like such a perfect capper to the entire series that I had to do a double check to make sure that wasn't the series finale. I'll be very interested to see what happens next.

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 

Ok, smarter people than me, I'm ready for the "explanation" :cool:

post #33 of 38

I don't really know if an explanation is needed and wouldn't even know where to begin. I loved the final episode. It was a beautiful summation of Kevin and Nora's journeys. 

 

It may have been cool to see dueling episodes each focused on Kevin's and Nora's time in the other side. We got Kevin's, but perhaps it's fitting that they didn't depict Nora's. There's enough there to keep things ambiguous. 

 

So what can we take away from this series?

 

I really don't know what to make of the "Kevin is either crazy or he's the messiah - but he can't die either way" storyline. I guess in the end, the show is trying to say crazy shit happens in life that you have no control over. Things will shake you and leave you questioning your faith or meaning. But instead of going crazy trying to find answers or living for the next life, you really just have to embrace the one you have. Love the people around you and make the most of it.

 

I don't know if others will find that that a satisfying answer to the show's mysteries. But the series was a great ride and I loved spending time with it.

post #34 of 38

I believe her.

post #35 of 38

I was surprised, we got way more 'answers' than I expected. To me it provided explanations to the disappearances and Kevin's 'immortality' (his pacemaker addressing his heart condition). Sure the explanations were thin as hell, but disappearances were a device, as was Kevin's condition. And that was to explore the human response to the inexplicable. From the extreme of mental illness (kevin and his father), to unshakable belief that you are right and dedication to a cause or religeon (Matt and Patty). To people's need to join or follow someone who claims to have answers (the GR, the church congregation).

 

I think ultimately the message of the show is.....chill the fuck out. Life will contain plenty of mysteries and tragedies, these will often defy explanation and people will act in extreme ways and often make things worse as a result. Instead, we should treat each other with kindness and love, and enjoy the beauty life has to offer. 

post #36 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3nnui View Post
 

I think ultimately the message of the show is.....chill the fuck out. Life will contain plenty of mysteries and tragedies, these will often defy explanation and people will act in extreme ways and often make things worse as a result. Instead, we should treat each other with kindness and love, and enjoy the beauty life has to offer. 

 

So...let the mystery be?

 

I was also surprised that we actually got some answer on the radiation machine and where the people went, even if it was never explained WHY the disappearances happened. 

 

And I guess I didn't pick up on the heart condition being an explanation for his weird "immortality." So the heart condition somehow allowed his heart to just restart itself after it had been dead for several hours? And that's why he kept coming back to life? Doesn't really explain what he experienced during those moments of death, but I suppose that could all easily just be random firings of his brain synapses as everything was winding down...or winding back up.

 

I was kind of suprised Lori didn't kill herself. I'm not sure what all that mess was about going out and scuba diving during a horrible impending storm if she wasn't going to end it. Unless they are suggesting she went out there and changed her mind.

post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Turner View Post

 

And I guess I didn't pick up on the heart condition being an explanation for his weird "immortality." So the heart condition somehow allowed his heart to just restart itself after it had been dead for several hours? And that's why he kept coming back to life? Doesn't really explain what he experienced during those moments of death, but I suppose that could all easily just be random firings of his brain synapses as everything was winding down...or winding back up.

 

I don't know about "easily".  I think the show eventually overplayed its hand.  After about the fourth or fifth time, when he's repeatedly drowning himself without even any real plan for being resuscitated, it's not easy to buy the "maybe this is just dreams" explanation.

post #38 of 38
Just caught up with the show. After a rough go of the first season (33 percent good, 33 percent bad "peak tv" tics, and 33 percent brilliant) it was on rails big time for the last two seasons. It felt like the perfect vehicle for the stuff Lindelof likes to explore without all stuff he doesn't.

That second season song was expert trolling.
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