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Favorite Film Scores of This Century (2000 - Present)

post #1 of 152
Thread Starter 

Since I know that there are others here who love movie scores (just as I know there are also others totally uninterested in the topic!), I thought it might be interesting to have a space to discuss some of our favorites of (relatively) recent years as a companion piece to the "Underrated Film Scores" thread I started a few years ago.  There’s been a lot of talk about how the art of film scoring has gone downhill somewhat, so I figured we might want to highlight some of the obvious - and not so obvious - gems that are out there from the last 17 years.  Your favorites, your guilty pleasures, the ones you think are objectively “the best”… all are welcome.

 

I’ll kick things off with what I regard as James Newton Howard’s masterpiece, THE VILLAGE from 2004… 

 

 

Haunting, achingly gorgeous, and - at times - truly unsettling, featuring stunning solo violin writing and performance throughout.  This is my go-to autumn score; I can't listen to it without thinking of a crisp breeze and leaves changing color.  This is the sound of the fall season to me.  The album release is quite incomplete, leaving out many of the more mysterious and suspenseful highlights, but the full recording sessions are floating around out there for those willing to look.

post #2 of 152

Sunshine (2007) - score by John Murphy

I know the main theme was played to death in trailers for a while, but when it hits its crescendo, I nearly levitate out of my seat:

post #3 of 152

How to Train Your Dragon and How to Train Your Dragon II by John Powell

 

There are moments in these scores that bring me to tears even divorced from the images they accompany.  Powell's crafted at least four memorable themes across these two films and weaves them expertly throughout the scores, using them for moments of heroism, comedy, romance and tragedy.  

 

I could trot out the greatest hits from the first film like "Test Drive," but I want to go a little deeper than that.  For instance, you've got "Forbidden Friendship," with it's slow, insistent build to that wonderful crescendo:

 

 

And the incredibly delicate piano version of the main theme in "Where's Hiccup?":

 

 

"For the Dancing and the Dreaming" from the sequel, the spritely romantic song between Stoick and Valka:

 

 

Then he takes that same melody and absolutely shatters you with it in this track:

 

 

But I don't think any track shows the range and depth of what he did with these scores better than the opening track from II's score:

 

 

The way he weaves all those themes together is just magical.

post #4 of 152

Hard for me to top INCEPTION.  I happen to like Hans Zimmer's work quite a bit, but this soundtrack is exceptional:

 

 

 

 

post #5 of 152

post #6 of 152

Guess I'll be the one to throw down the elephant (or, rather, oliphaunt) in the room.

 

 

 

 

I could have picked any random track from each film. It's an achievement on an absolutely awe-inspiring scale - hard to throw out any superlatives that haven't been heard a hundred times (and aren't deserved). A magnum opus and career-defining work from Howard Shore. As great as the films are, his music is what takes it to the next level. I'll definitely have more (some famous, some less-so) scores to post, but let's drop the big gun now.

post #7 of 152
I'm trying to think of ones that I've felt went under appreciated when the films were released, but as of right now only the obvious, already lauded soundtracks are ones I can think of, such as Howard Shore's excellent Lord of the Rings work and John Williams once again somehow finding a melody that is now inextricably linked with the series it's apart of for the Harry Potter films.

I guess I'll go with another early 2000s award winner. Since it holds the distinction out of the almost a hundred of soundtracks I own as being my most listened to.
post #8 of 152
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

How to Train Your Dragon and How to Train Your Dragon II by John Powell

Love these scores, as well.  I'm a particularly big fan of the villain's theme from 2, which I think is way too good for that relative nothing of a character...

There's also some incredible brass writing throughout the scores, but nothing gets me pumped up quite like the ultra-swashbuckling section that eventually bursts forth here...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

Guess I'll be the one to throw down the elephant (or, rather, oliphaunt) in the room.

 

I could have picked any random track from each film. It's an achievement on an absolutely awe-inspiring scale - hard to throw out any superlatives that haven't been heard a hundred times (and aren't deserved). A magnum opus and career-defining work from Howard Shore. As great as the films are, his music is what takes it to the next level. I'll definitely have more (some famous, some less-so) scores to post, but let's drop the big gun now.

I was wondering how long it would be until these showed up!  Incredible scores, though FELLOWSHIP remains my favorite.  This is such a stunner...

 

post #9 of 152

Can't link to YouTube right now, but I'm a big fan of everything Clint Mansell has done with Darren Aronofsky, particularly the OSTs for Requiem for a Dream (which still seems to pop up in various trailers) and The Fountain.

post #10 of 152
Thread Starter 

I'll submit the first John Williams selection of the thread, and that's WAR HORSE.  Big, lush, lyrical writing that features some of his best melodies of the 21st century.  It's a score where Williams pours it on thick, but I happen to love Williams in that mode.  The finale cue is one of his most beautifully cathartic ending cues.  It's incredibly emotional scoring, and it's easily among my top 15 or so John Williams soundtracks.

 

 

post #11 of 152

Ooh, War Horse. That's a good 'un. The Reunion is my pick for best track on that album - the end is just gorgeous. As for LOTR - it's too hard to pick a favorite film score, let alone a favorite track. Every fifteen-odd minutes there's a new astonishment. The third act of ROTK at times is being held together by sheer force of orchestral will on Shore's part. I was sorry the Breaking of the Fellowship motif didn't return in that film, but the way he almost brings it back and plays around with it in the score of the scene where Frodo wakes up post-Mount Doom is just a staggering piece of scoring.

 

So let's go to the complete opposite spectrum with Williams for this one:

 

 

What else is there to say? Williams cuts loose and has fun and it's just plain fucking cool. Instantly iconic.

post #12 of 152
Thread Starter 

Oh boy, do I love CATCH ME IF YOU CAN.  Should have been an Oscar winner.  I believe Williams himself described the score as a kind of "confection," and that's certainly true on one level - it's a delightful, glossy, glamorous score - but I think he undersells its dramatic effectiveness.  The theme for Frank's father has surprising pathos and melancholy.

 

My next pick would be possibly my favorite Thomas Newman score, ROAD TO PERDITION.  It's classic Newman, featuring his trademark marriage of piano and luminous strings, as well as surprisingly eerie dissonance at points.

 

post #13 of 152

One of the handful of scores that almost always makes me need to watch the movie again is Nick Cave & Warren Ellis's work on The Assassination of Jesse James by The Coward Robert Ford:

 

 

It's equal parts Dirge for the Old West and glittery dream sequence.

 

 

And there's one track that isn't on the score album that comes in right at the end of the credits that I really love. Apparently was re-used in The Theory of Everything?

 

 

post #14 of 152
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fafhrd View Post
 

One of the handful of scores that almost always makes me need to watch the movie again is Nick Cave & Warren Ellis's work on The Assassination of Jesse James by The Coward Robert Ford:

This is an amazingly evocative score, and it fits the tone of the film incredibly well.

post #15 of 152

UNDER THE SKIN by Mica Levi is the most haunting and mesmerizing score in recent memory.  Truly alien, as it should be.

 

post #16 of 152

On the Pixar tip, I gotta go with Michael Giacchino's score for Up. The way he uses the same melody to go from heartbreaking to exhiliarating is wonderful:

 


 

post #17 of 152

Mad Max: Fury Road by Junkie XL. Just an utterly propulsive blast. And the way it's woven into the film is marvelously done. 

 

Best track obviously goes to Brothers in Arms.

 

post #18 of 152

Hate the movie or love it. Best superhero soundtrack of the century so far.

 

 

 

And one of my favourites from the past couple of years, by Daniel Pemberton.

 

 

post #19 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post
 

Hate the movie or love it. Best superhero soundtrack of the century so far.

 

 

 

And one of my favourites from the past couple of years, by Daniel Pemberton.

 

 

 

Zimmer's score for MOS is fantastic.  Very rousing.

 

And i'm kicking myself for forgetting UNCLE.  THAT is one of the best scores of the past decade...just a fun, fun romp.

post #20 of 152

TRON: LEGACY by Daft Punk.

 

 

The film itself is a beautifully empty movie, but the soundtrack is lush and evocative.  Very strong work.

 

post #21 of 152

Absolutely 100% get behind Brothers in Arms from Mad Max Fury Road as one of the very best soundtrack pieces I've heard for so so many years. It's use in the second chase scene of the movie plus the masterly editing and sound design on that scene just gives me goosebumps every single time. Such a great track for such a great sequence.

 

Also want to heap praise on Jed Kurzel for his Macbeth score. Taken as a whole it can come across as a bit dirge-ish. It's a stark, bleak and grating affair that can wear you down, but also captured the bleakness and rawness that can be the highlands and also manages to to stand it's ground and become a character itself in a movie that had a brooding, glowering, growling performance by Fasbender and some beautiful haunting imagery.

 

The standout piece for me is the track Macbeth.

 

 

 

 

And here it is in-situ. A Haunting piece that leaves you drained after such a bleak movie. I keep thinking the music is going to break and rise up triumphantly, but it doesn't - there's just no respite from the bleak melancholy...

 

post #22 of 152

Going back to John Powell, his collaboration with Harry Gregson-Williams on Chicken Run really elevates the film.  It treats the story with the just the right mix of heroic silliness.  The main theme is a lovingly spot-on evocation of Elmer Bernstein's The Great Escape:

 

 

"Building the Crate" is one of my favorite tracks of the century so far.  Just a thrilling, bravura piece of scoring, which is rarely said about anything featuring kazoos.

 

 

And in the last half of "The Chickens Are Revolting," they take that theme and turn it into an epic, defianrt march (around 1:45):

 

 

The pair also did great work on the Shrek score a year later (seriously, listen to "Fairytale" and "Ride the Dragon"), but I think this is the better overall score.

post #23 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

 

This is the correct response. 

 

I would also throw in the way Goransson knows how to employ the Rocky theme at the exact right moment as being one of the more masterful bits of scoring. 

post #24 of 152

It came out in 2000, so it just meets the metric, and it set the tone for a lot of really bad scores to come, but let's not forget Hans Zimmer's GLADIATOR score. The war themes are what get the most attention, but I think that ending suite - Elysium, Honor Him, and Now We Are Free - is still pretty incredible. Part of the reason that movie ends on such a high note is because of that score, and that final shot. 

 

 

Speaking of Zimmer, you could argue that his theme for PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL is cribbed from his greatest hits, including the aformentioned Gladiator and a little bit of The Rock, but that first score is a pretty wonderful action-adventure soundtrack. There's been a lot of discussion about how the Marbel Cinnamon movies don't have iconic, hummable themes, so Zimmer's gotta get some credit for coming up for a now-instantly-recognizable theme for these films - for a movie based on a theme park ride, no less. 

 

If I had to pick my favorite score from the 2000s, though, I would probably have to go with Cliff Martinez's chilly, propulsive score to CONTAGION. He did similar work for DRIVE and later THE KNICK, both of which are great, but the use of pianos and pulsing synths makes it a perfect soundtrack to the film (an underrated masterpiece). 

post #25 of 152

Appropriate that an underappreciated film would have an underappreciated score, but that's Stardust for you.  Ilan Eshkeri crafted a wonderfully adventurous, romantic fairy tale score for this gem of a film.

 

 

post #26 of 152

If I can cheat a tad, I want to include my personal favorite score of the past 20 years: THE MUMMY by Jerry Goldsmith.  This is just perfection from beginning to end and proof that, in a pinch, Jerry could have taken over for John Williams.

 

 

 

 

post #27 of 152

Heresy:  I kinda prefer Alan Silvestri's score for The Mummy Returns over Goldsmith's for The Mummy.

 

 

post #28 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

Heresy:  I kinda prefer Alan Silvestri's score for The Mummy Returns over Goldsmith's for The Mummy.

 

 

post #29 of 152

If you were to make the argument that the first decade of the 2000s, score-wise, belonged to Howard Shore and Hans Zimmer, I'd argue that this decade belongs to Michael Giacchino on one hand - and on the other, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, whose first collaboration created one of the best scores not just of the century, but of all time: 

 

Reznor and Ross reunited for The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, but that one isn't as memorable as their next collaboration with David Fincher, Gone Girl. Much the way "In Motion" provides the soundtrack for the creation of Facemash, lending that scene instantly iconic status, their track "Technically Missing" is the backdrop for Gone Girl's central aria. It was hard to picture how that scene would play out when reading the book - but Fincher pulled it off, in no small part thanks to Reznor and Ross. As things start to unravel for Nick Dunne, the score builds and builds, buzzing and humming, until it sounds like almost static and then - black. Then, after those famous lines ("I'm so much happier now that I'm dead,") this piece begins and if we weren't along for the ride, we sure are now.

 

What's great about Gone Girl is how it uses found noises - chimes, musak, all part of the haunted, decaying Americana at the core of the film. 

 

Reznor and Ross's next collaboration is the ten plus hour documentary on The Vietnam War from Ken Burns, about as perfect a paring as I can imagine. It's also worth noting that Ross has done his own, innovative work independent of Reznor. A particular stand-out is the score for the Brian Wilson biopic, Love & Mercy, which is more of a sound collage than a score - Ross, I believe, used pre-existing material from the extensive Brian Wilson/Beach Boys archives and recordings, repurposing them into something haunting and sad and beautiful, just like the film's subject: 

 

Finally, thinking about Ross brought me to Nicholas Britell, who most recently composed Moonlight but who also did the fantastic score for The Big Short, which included this piece made entirely from computer noises: 

 

Wait, I lied. Howard Shore's work for LOTR is great and iconic - but I also love back that he went back to his chilly, minimalist work a la Silence of the Lambs for Spotlight: 

post #30 of 152

Another really good atmospheric OST is Clint Mansell's soundtrack for Moon.

 

post #31 of 152

Assassination of Jesse James is a masterpiece, both score and film. Both Up and Chicken Run are killers as well - brilliant stuff. And of the more atmospheric ones, Social Network takes the prize for me, along with one more that I'll get to later.

 

For now, let's do another animated film:

 

This is an arrangement that incorporates the track Day of the River into the middle of the original One Summer's Day, for some reason, but the original is one of the greatest opening tracks of all time, in my opinion. Hisaishi effortlessly captures Chihiro's melancholy and loneliness - and then it just takes that beautifully orchestrated turn into high adventure. And we're off into a musical wonderland. From the Carnival of the Animals-inspired Soot Sprites and Procession of the Spirits, to the achingly beautiful Sixth Station, to the absolutely soaring Reprise and beyond, it's an absolutely magical score. Eminently re-listenable, it's superb musical storytelling and my favorite Hisaishi score.

post #32 of 152
Thread Starter 

I'm currently out of rep, but I'm thrilled to be discovering scores I've never heard before, or rediscovering scores I've never heard outside their films!

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

On the Pixar tip, I gotta go with Michael Giacchino's score for Up. The way he uses the same melody to go from heartbreaking to exhiliarating is wonderful:

UP isn't my favorite Giacchino score, but it was a deserving Oscar winner.  His main theme is extraordinarily versatile and emotionally loaded.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

It came out in 2000, so it just meets the metric, and it set the tone for a lot of really bad scores to come, but let's not forget Hans Zimmer's GLADIATOR score. The war themes are what get the most attention, but I think that ending suite - Elysium, Honor Him, and Now We Are Free - is still pretty incredible. Part of the reason that movie ends on such a high note is because of that score, and that final shot. 

 

Speaking of Zimmer, you could argue that his theme for PIRATES OF THE CARRIBEAN: THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL is cribbed from his greatest hits, including the aformentioned Gladiator and a little bit of The Rock, but that first score is a pretty wonderful action-adventure soundtrack.

GLADIATOR is a tremendously influential score, and a pretty satisfying listen... even as I'm of the opinion that it's mostly a testing ground for ideas that Zimmer would eventually hone and flesh out to full effect in later scores.

 

As for PIRATES, there's no question for me that AT WORLD'S END is the best score of the series, and one of Zimmer's very best, too...

 

Everyone loves "Up is Down," but this track is a phenomenal action setpiece which juggles numerous themes with bombastic ease.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

If I can cheat a tad, I want to include my personal favorite score of the past 20 years: THE MUMMY by Jerry Goldsmith.  This is just perfection from beginning to end and proof that, in a pinch, Jerry could have taken over for John Williams.

I'll allow this, because I absolutely LOVE Goldsmith's score.  It's not only probably his best score of the 1990s, but one of his most purely fun and entertaining, too.  Top notch adventure scoring.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

Heresy:  I kinda prefer Alan Silvestri's score for The Mummy Returns over Goldsmith's for The Mummy.

Silvestri's action motif is so damn catchy!

post #33 of 152
Thread Starter 

To wade into Giacchino waters, THE INCREDIBLES...

 

 

Some hear just a John Barry pastiche.  I hear a big, gloriously sixties-ish, jazzy, exciting score that never fails to put a smile on my face.

post #34 of 152

Love the Pirates score!

 

Of more recent scores The Handmaiden soundtrack by Jo Yeong-wook is a fucking monster.

 

 

post #35 of 152

Since we're getting into Mikey G, my favorite of his - after UP - is probably TOMORROWLAND. Now, I'm in the tank for this movie hard, but I love how he updates and plays with a lot of that "60s future optimism" and themes from the Disney parks - not anything directly lifting from them, but more riffing on them. As an example, compare and contrast what he did to update the Space Mountain theme: 

 

With his end suite for TOMORROWLAND: 

 

post #36 of 152

Oh hell yes, The Handmaiden. That score is an absolute beast. Best of 2016, hands down. That one was on my list to post, so cheers, Evi.

 

Since the thread's on a Mikey G kick, I'll say that my favorite score of his is his work on Lost. But my favorite film score of his is probably Ratatouille.

 

 

It's another pastiche-mode score - Giacchino's riffing on European caper scores (as is another favorite of mine of the decade), but it's done with such flair and delight that it's impossible not to be charmed. More technically sophisticated than his other Pixar scores IMO, but it belies a surprisingly emotional heart. For me, this was the one that confirmed he was the real deal.

post #37 of 152
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post
 

Love the Pirates score!

 

Of more recent scores The Handmaiden soundtrack by Jo Yeong-wook is a fucking monster.

Wow, that's absolutely stunning and sumptuous!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Since we're getting into Mikey G, my favorite of his - after UP - is probably TOMORROWLAND.

Big fan of this one, too.  The unabashed, gee whiz optimism is really infectious.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

Since the thread's on a Mikey G kick, I'll say that my favorite score of his is his work on Lost. But my favorite film score of his is probably Ratatouille.

 

It's another pastiche-mode score - Giacchino's riffing on European caper scores (as is another favorite of mine of the decade), but it's done with such flair and delight that it's impossible not to be charmed. More technically sophisticated than his other Pixar scores IMO, but it belies a surprisingly emotional heart. For me, this was the one that confirmed he was the real deal.

RATATOUILLE is probably top 5 Giacchino for me.  I practically wore out the CD the summer it was released.  The action-y stuff is manic and frantic in delightful ways, the caper-y stuff is on a nicely Mancini-esque sort of level, and the main theme really does have that emotional heart you talk about.  Love it!

post #38 of 152
Thread Starter 

More low-hanging fruit: John Williams' HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE.  It's easy to take this score for granted because of how utterly iconic its main theme has become, but the overall score itself is Williams at peak whimsical powers; the way he infuses grand melody with an (at times) chamber music-esque, medieval-y sensibility is just superb.  His orchestrations are absolutely top-flight here, as well.  It's one of his many masterpieces.

 

"Harry's Wondrous World" is one of his greatest concert suites, and it's dazzling for the way he's effortlessly able to conjure up that magical feeling.  It's an absolutely perfect match for the material.  I've chosen that track because it highlights many of the themes in the score other than the very familiar main theme.

 

 

This is also another case where if a person can track down the complete recording sessions, it's absolutely worth the effort.  There are some incredible passages that were left off the album.

post #39 of 152

I'm going to a performance of the 1st Potter movie's score (played along with the film on a big screen) in July.

 

I would prefer it to be a performance of Azkaban...  but I'll take it!!

post #40 of 152
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

I'm going to a performance of the 1st Potter movie's score (played along with the film on a big screen) in July.

 

I would prefer it to be a performance of Azkaban...  but I'll take it!!

That sounds like it would be a great time. 

 

And yeah, AZKABAN's score is great, too.  You can feel Cuaron pushing Williams a tiny bit outside his comfort zone on that one, and the result is a score full of phenomenal highlights... but a slightly disjointed feeling.  I think SORCERER'S STONE is a more cohesive overall work, though it's arguably lacking a highlight quite as triumphant as "Buckbeak's Flight," for example.

post #41 of 152

You're right.  The first movie would likely be a better concert experience than Azkaban.

 

But I just prefer to watch Azkaban again in that context.

 

I recently went to a performance of ET in Vancouver.  Amazing.

post #42 of 152
Thread Starter 

Well, AZKABAN is unquestionably the better film, certainly.

 

I haven't had a chance to attend any "live to picture" concerts, but when I saw John Williams in concert in 2014, he had the orchestra play what he calls "The Children's Suite" for SORCERER'S STONE:  mini suites highlighting different sections of the orchestra, with arrangements and explorations of his themes for Voldemort, Diagon Alley, Quidditch, Hogwarts, the Numbus 2000 broom, Hedwig, Harry's family, and Fluffy's harp.  A couple of these made it onto the album ("Fluffy's Harp," for example, which is a different arrangement than what you hear in the film version of the cue), but the rest were also recorded at the same time and remain (officially) unreleased.  They're great little pieces, especially the Voldemort and Family suites.

post #43 of 152

Seeing ET in concert was a special experience.

 

The richness of the orchestra's sound in the performance space was so lush that it felt like the music was coming directly FROM the film (in a magical mystical way) as opposed to being played in sync with it.

 

And of course, the isolated sound fx and dialogue track from the film itself was coming from speakers in a way that isn't suited for a performance space like that.  So there's that disconnect between the music and the sound fx/dialogue.  But I don't say that as a minus.  It actually reminds me that I'm listening to a live orchestra whenever I end up getting absorbed in the film and almost forgetting that I'm at a live performance.

post #44 of 152
Thread Starter 

The DVD of E.T. had a special audio channel where you could listen to the live performance that John Williams conducted at the movie's 20th Anniversary premiere.  That's one of the more unique special features I've ever seen/heard.

post #45 of 152

One of the things I LOVE about going to these performances (I've only been to ones for PSYCHO and ET) is that the performance has an intermission.

 

And both PSYCHO and ET performances put the intermission in absolutely perfect structural points.  Not only that, the film goes to black for the break... and the orchestra plays out the score as it is in the film, but continues to finish it off after the film goes to black with a concert suite flourish.

 

Ever since I went to the performance of PSYCHO years ago, I really wish that all more films would have intermission breaks regardless of how long they are!  It gives a good film such a nice additional sense of occasion.

post #46 of 152

I've seen ET, 2001, and selected highlights from Fantasia (tragically, not Night on Bald Mountain) in concert, in addition to attending the Williams concert here at the Bowl every year since 2010. Spectacular experiences, one and all.

 

Gonna do the other European caper-inspired score on my list:

 

 

Nathan Johnson isn't really known as an orchestral composer (his soundtracks for Brick and Looper are much more soundscapes), but on this one he does something more traditional and absolutely kills it. That first track sets an amazing tone - a kind of leitmotif jazz with a surprisingly high number of themes that Johnson will bend and twist and play with over the course of the film. The instrumentation is consistently inventive over the course of the whole score, it's dazzlingly sophisticated in its orchestration, all oblique angles and lushly romantic and wry and melancholy, and all building up to:

 

 

 

At first it's gorgeously bleak and defeated, a beautifully sad payoff to the score... and then it just all turns around. It's so joyous and vibrant and alive. And it sticks the landing on every single musical theme he's laid out over the whole film. I wish Johnson would do more orchestral scores, because based on this, he'd be top-tier in no time at all. As it stands, though, this is in my top 5 scores for the 21st century.

post #47 of 152

I'm looking through the Oscar winners for this century. I'll have to find clips, but I gotta shout out TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY (nominee), CAROL (nominee), and THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (winner.)

 

Oh, and I forgot - MICHAEL CLAYTON is another one that gets a lot of play from me. I'm a huge, huge fan of that one. 

post #48 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

I'm looking through the Oscar winners for this century. I'll have to find clips, but I gotta shout out TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY (nominee), CAROL (nominee), and THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (winner.)

 

Oh, and I forgot - MICHAEL CLAYTON is another one that gets a lot of play from me. I'm a huge, huge fan of that one. 

You and I are on the same page, sir. Those three were the next ones on my list to post.

post #49 of 152

Morricone won the Oscar based on a score which consists of a lot of his old material, including the Exorcist 2 theme and unused segments from "The Thing," but his main theme from "The Hateful Eight" is m'fin glorious:

 


 

post #50 of 152

Fuck, and how could I miss A BEAUTIFUL MIND? Horner gets a lot of flack for recyling his material, and Beautiful Mind is very reminiscent of SEARCHING FOR BOBBY FISHER, but I think the math-chess connection is a nice pairing/callback, and the Charlotte Church vocals really enhance the material. 

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