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post #51 of 70
Thread Starter 

stevenspielberg-80s-hat-camera.jpg

post #52 of 70
PLEASE!!!

I SAID I DON'T WANT TRABBLE!!!
post #53 of 70
Was he the first to use the dolly in zoom out shot? I can't think of anyone else using that shot before him?
post #54 of 70
well if you count Hitchcock using it for the vertigo effect in...

VERTIGO
post #55 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cccc View Post

Was he the first to use the dolly in zoom out shot? I can't think of anyone else using that shot before him?

 

I believe it was Hitchcock.

post #56 of 70
Of course. I forgot about Hitch.
post #57 of 70
unless cccc is talking specifically about the version of the technique that pushes into a character's close-up???

then... I don't know
post #58 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

unless cccc is talking specifically about the version of the technique that pushes into a character's close-up???

then... I don't know

I am and Veritgo was the first.
post #59 of 70

Spielberg ghost-directed "Vertigo" too.

post #60 of 70
This video HERE has a collection of dolly zooms from Vertigo to the current millennium.

Speaking of videos, would it be a ton more work to do these breakdowns as video commentary Ambler? I assume you already have all the editing gear you could need, and it might be a way you can expand your audience beyond just us goofy reprobates here at CHUD. Maybe even build an audience for a YouTube channel, which in turn would be there for you when it's time to promote/release your own future works. I'm fairly sure having the scenes overlaid with commentary and paused/reversed as and when needed to lay down your points would keep them clear of too much copyright malarkey.
post #61 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post

There's a fan theory that posits that Hammond didn't actually clone dinosaurs but genetically engineered animals that looked like the popular conception of dinosaurs.  It's his flea circus writ large.  And it's a prime example of people just being completely unable to let movies just be movies.

Actually, this is sort of what the book talks about.
post #62 of 70
Jurassic Park has dinosaurs in it. The end.
post #63 of 70

hitchcock did it first

post #64 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

Jurassic Park has dinosaurs in it. The end.
But the book does call into question how accurate the beasts are. Hammond did ask Dr. Wu specifically to make them more like the cliche ferocious lizards everybody thought they were.
post #65 of 70
I didn't realize you wrote for the AV Club!
post #66 of 70

Go read a book, Bradley!

post #67 of 70
Thread Starter 
post #68 of 70
Thread Starter 



E.T. needs no introduction for people who are fans of Spielberg's work. It pretty much has come to define him as a director, and he has said many times it's his most personal film. He famously shot the movie without storyboards, his most trusted directorial tool. As a result the film comes across as more effortless and earnest than any of his previous films. IMO E.T. represents Spielberg at his height as a director, as most of his well known techniques can be found in this movie.

I'll examine one of these techniques in this breakdown. Most people don't realize this is one of the only films with a puppet as its main character at a time where CGI didn't exist. The Dark Crystal was released the same year, but it was more fantasy, and realism was not necessarily on its mind. E.T. on the other hand had to be a completely believable looking puppet that audiences could mistake for real. On top of that, for a puppet like that to carry a whole movie is itself a herculean task which I don't think people really appreciate... it's easy to get caught up in the magic without realizing the barriers it broke through.

One of the reasons the movie is so effective is because of how much the audience came to believe and identify with E.T. as a character. This identification is tied to some pretty basic concepts rooted in psychology. E.T. looks incredibly believable, but in order for the puppet to go beyond just being a realistic movie prop and become a character with an arc and real feelings we can understand, it was necessary to slowly bring the audience into his point of view. As well as present E.T. as an ambiguous character we could project our feelings into.







It is very hard to see the creatures rummaging in the background of these images, but they are there. And the haziness of the proceedings is intentional. It serves a few different purposes. One, it cleverly forces the audience to pay more attention to what is going on, sucking them into the movie. Two, it obscures the creature to the point where the following chase and abandonment become more participatory, since we don't see who it is happening to, allowing us to project ourselves into that situation, in a sense merging our feelings with E.T.'s (which itself is a plot point). And three, it does something a little strange.... it generates a bit of fear, thanks to the darkness, mist, strange creatures moving in the background and the strange noises they make. This opening sequence was actually kind of scary in 1982. I remember that well. Children were notoriously frightened of E.T., but at the same time totally enraptured with the creature. This opening sequence uses a horror movie technique to catch people off guard, and the subsequent positive emotions that follow during the rest of the film is part of the emotional rollercoaster that made the film such a smash hit people had to see multiple times.
post #69 of 70
Thanks Ambler, glad you had more for us here! I enjoy the fact that E.T. and Starman were released in similar time period and have similar starting points, plot wise. Except ones a puppet and the other is a sexy Jeff Bridges.


Hey, apologies to Tobe Hooper, but any chance of doing Poltergeist?
post #70 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil spurn View Post

Hey, apologies to Tobe Hooper, but any chance of doing Poltergeist?

 

http://www.chud.com/community/t/144395/the-poltergeist-trilogy/50#post_4352129

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