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PHANTOM THREAD (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017) - Page 2

post #51 of 88

Remains of the Day?

 

So good.

post #52 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasp View Post
 

Remains of the Day?

 

So good.

I bought Room With a View on Criterion...DDL is so different from his later films as to be surreal.

 

As for PTA, TWBB is my favorite, the film Kubrick wasn't able to make; DDL is towering to the point of parody, but it's perfect for that movie, and one of the best performances of all time. One of my favorite movies ever, and it's still maybe in the top 5 of 2007. What a year.

post #53 of 88

Love that movie.  Maggie Smith, Judi Dench, Helena Bonham Carter, Denholm Elliot, SImon Callow.  The cast is so good DDL doesn't even merit one of top five performances in it.

post #54 of 88

Finally a synopsis:

 

Quote:
Set in the glamour of 1950s post-war London, renowned dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) and his sister Cyril (Lesley Manville) are at the center of British fashion, dressing royalty, movie stars, heiresses, socialites, debutants and dames with the distinct style of The House of Woodcock. Women come and go through Woodcock’s life, providing the confirmed bachelor with inspiration and companionship, until he comes across a young, strong-willed woman, Alma (Vicky Krieps), who soon becomes a fixture in his life as his muse and lover. Once controlled and planned, he finds his carefully tailored life disrupted by love. With his latest film, Paul Thomas Anderson paints an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running. Phantom Thread is Paul Thomas Anderson’s eighth movie, and his second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis.

 

Also multiple people close to the production say it is a more art house/better/more mature version of 'Fifty Shades of Grey' if you can believe that.

post #55 of 88

The trailer is exquisite. Love the tone it establishes. 

 

The poster is kind of bad.

 

The MPAA rating is, "Rated R for language." So if this film gets into Fifty Shades territory it must do so with shattering subtlety. Which isn't necessarily the wrong way to go about this subject matter if that is what Paul Thomas Anderson is putting together here.

post #56 of 88
I could be wrong, but I doubt the film has anything to do with bdsm. It's more likely the control he exerts over her, and the way the fashion plays into that.
post #57 of 88

Yeah, that sounds right to me as well.

post #58 of 88

I agree about The Master improving a lot on second viewing. At first it felt meandering and pointlessly oblique, but once you get what it's actually getting at it's more focused and straightforward than it seemed. I still think some tightening up would've improved it, but it's solid. And yes I didn't know what to make of Inherent Vice at all, really.

 

This one looks very mature and handsomely made and old-school prestigy, but aside from that it's hard to have any opinion on it either way. On the one hand I respect PTA's willingness to go subtle. But at the same time, would TWBB be as memorable if it wasn't as willing to go to operatic extremes?

 

However this one turns out I doubt it'll make a penny!

post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post
 

 TWBB be as memorable if it wasn't as willing to go to operatic extremes?

 

 

I think the kind of story and character that TWBB was centered on, it kind of had to be what it was. It's aesthetic had to be as grimy and big and intense as Daniel Plainview.

 

DDL is playing a different sort of character in Phantom Thread, and it's a different type of story. From what I can tell, a slightly more low-key approach is more appropriate.

post #60 of 88

Excited to see this one. I also feel weird for being like the only person to like Inherent Vice ha ha.

post #61 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene A. Moncivais View Post
 

Excited to see this one. I also feel weird for being like the only person to like Inherent Vice ha ha.


I like Inherent Vice, the movie, but having read the book, I could see how a lot of people would get lost and not have any idea what is going on and just check out.  I read the book and I still don't fully understand the way everything connects, but I have a pretty good grasp of it.  If I hadn't read the book, I am not sure how I would feel about it. 

 

Also, the movie is much more languidly paced then I felt the book was and that was a bit jarring the first time I saw it.

 

I know some people mentioned not liking The Big Lebowski the first time they saw it, and I was kind of in the same boat.  The more I watched it though, the more I started to appreciate it, but I think Inherent Vice is even more puzzling, in a way.  I almost feel like you would have to watch it multiple times before you even start to get how the story fits together as a whole(or maybe people understand it and just don't care, which is also valid).  That's a lot to ask a viewer when your film has close to a 3 hour running time.  I enjoy it, but I get why others may not.

 

It certainly has some great moments though and I definitely liked it more the second time I watched it.

post #62 of 88

I think I'd like Inherent Vice better if I hadn't read the book!

 

Maybe then I could just enjoy Vice on its own terms. There were so many things I was looking forward to in the movie that either weren't there, or really truncated, or changed in a way that I didn't care for.

 

And, as a whole, I just don't think the movie comes together. When you read the book--and Pynchon is really good about this--it's not like themes are explicitly stated... but you can feel them in the writing, nonetheless.

 

In the movie, I just didn't get that feeling. It felt lost to me, or like PTA had lost it somewhere in the editing room.

post #63 of 88

I'm going to get excoriated for this, but it looks dreadfully dull.

post #64 of 88

Day Lewis automatically un-dulls anything he's in, being so magnetic a presence.  

post #65 of 88

GUYS, IT DOESN'T LOOK DULL, MOVIES CAN BE ABOUT MID-CENTURY OBSESSIVE FASHION DESIGNERS, TOO, NOT JUST MARBLE HEROES

 

 

 

 

...sorry.

 

 

I seriously get so amped when I watched this trailer. I'm like, "Fuck yeah, grainy film! Keen character interplay! Shot of eyeball looking through peephole! Delicate piano! The way DDL looks at his hands when he laughs!"

 

This is my Last Jedi.

post #66 of 88
Thread Starter 

This thread has reminded me that I need to watch LADY MACBETH. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wasp View Post
 

GUYS, IT DOESN'T LOOK DULL, MOVIES CAN BE ABOUT MID-CENTURY OBSESSIVE FASHION DESIGNERS, TOO, NOT JUST MARBLE HEROES

 

...sorry.

 

 

I seriously get so amped when I watched this trailer. I'm like, "Fuck yeah, grainy film! Keen character interplay! Shot of eyeball looking through peephole! Delicate piano! The way DDL looks at his hands when he laughs!"

 

This is my Last Jedi.

 

I endorse this post. 

post #67 of 88

The thing about the dull comment is, if you think the subject matter is dull... fine.  But the trailer doesn't make the movie look dull.  Unless you're saying this looks like a boring version of a 50's era fashion movie, which otherwise you'd totally be into.  Which, I mean, none of you are saying that.

post #68 of 88

post #69 of 88

The real reason DDL quit acting (again):  he had to play Werner Herzog as an uptight English fashion mogul and the repressive existential gloom of it all finally broke him.

post #70 of 88

I was thinking about PTA being his own DP and there's an Indiewire article talking about how he is really knowledgeable about cameras, lenses, and all that.

 

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/06/paul-thomas-anderson-cinematographer-phantom-thread-daniel-day-lewis-1201848286/

 

Clearly, PTA is very involved with the visuals of his movies, but I think he's involved on a technical level, too, that goes far beyond what it is for most directors. I mean, I think Elswit's work with PTA is, far and away, Elswit's best work. Far and away. And I'd say the same of Mihai Malaimare, to an even larger degree. I noted before that I actually saw more influence of Malaimare than of Elswit on the cinematography we see in the Phantom Thread trailer, but maybe that's partly because it might have been even more of a 50/50 collaboration between PTA and Malaimare on the cinematography for The Master. Because I LURVE the cinematography for The Master, and I mean truly, madly, deeply lurve it... but don't really care much for any of Malaimare's other work. At all.

 

So, anyways, yeah, can't wait to see more of PTA's visuals without the "middle man," so to speak.

post #71 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasp View Post
 

I was thinking about PTA being his own DP and there's an Indiewire article talking about how he is really knowledgeable about cameras, lenses, and all that.

 

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/06/paul-thomas-anderson-cinematographer-phantom-thread-daniel-day-lewis-1201848286/

 

Clearly, PTA is very involved with the visuals of his movies, but I think he's involved on a technical level, too, that goes far beyond what it is for most directors. I mean, I think Elswit's work with PTA is, far and away, Elswit's best work. Far and away. And I'd say the same of Mihai Malaimare, to an even larger degree. I noted before that I actually saw more influence of Malaimare than of Elswit on the cinematography we see in the Phantom Thread trailer, but maybe that's partly because it might have been even more of a 50/50 collaboration between PTA and Malaimare on the cinematography for The Master. Because I LURVE the cinematography for The Master, and I mean truly, madly, deeply lurve it... but don't really care much for any of Malaimare's other work. At all.

 

So, anyways, yeah, can't wait to see more of PTA's visuals without the "middle man," so to speak.


If I remember correctly, he shot the black and white scenes in Magnolia("Green, Berry, Hill") with a really old camera to give it that feel of silent movies, or something(I can't remember exactly), so it doesn't surprise me that he would be a bit of tech geek, in regards to the cameras/lenses that he shoots with.

 

Sounds cool though.

post #72 of 88
post #73 of 88

That earlier article said that "Phantom Thread" would not be the final title of the movie. I guess that changed.

 

The visual beauty of PTA's films are as valuable as his scripts. I'm gonna go ahead and speculate that regardless of the credit, he still has an eye and knows how to put it on screen.

post #74 of 88

And he's being a little modest in a way.  I'd bet there's plenty of ASCs who really aren't much without a very good gaffer and camera department helping them out.

post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muzman View Post
 

And he's being a little modest in a way.  I'd bet there's plenty of ASCs who really aren't much without a very good gaffer and camera department helping them out.

I was going to say the same thing. I appreciate his humility and his equal sharing of credit with the lighting and camera crew, that's probably appropriate, especially in this case where he might be relying on the input and expertise of that crew more than your average DP... but at the end of the day, PTA's still the one calling the shots. Literally.

post #76 of 88

I wanted to love inherent vice. I watched it, I think I even tried watching it again......nothing. 

post #77 of 88

I wonder if a lack of cinematographer credit will result in a lack of awards recognition for Phantom Thread's cinematography?

 

Not that awards truly matter, but that'd be kind of stupid if Phantom Thread ends up having some of the best cinematography of the year (and the trailer definitely seems like it should at least be a nominee) yet isn't recognized for that because PTA doesn't want to call himself a director of photography.

post #78 of 88

I suppose they could submit it for nomination as a joint thing with PTA, Michael Bauman (gaffer), Colin Anderson (primary camera operator), or something like that...

post #79 of 88
Thread Starter 
post #80 of 88

Sneak previews are happening and, as you'd expect, the early Twitter reactions are strong with this one.

 

Lot of praise for the acting from DDL, Krieps, and Manville, and for Greenwood's score. Saw that it compares most closely, in PTA's oeuvre, to Punch Drunk Love, but I think that comparison might just be because it's a slightly twisted love story that I'm seeing described as "darkly comic."

 

There's a promo for the previews that has some new footage and is overlaid on a conversation between DDL and Krieps and it's just fantastic.

 

My body is ready.

post #81 of 88

Phantom Thread also made National Board of Review's top films list and received a nod along with The Disaster Artist for best screenplay.

post #82 of 88

Thought this was a pretty interesting quote from PTA regarding Phantom Thread:

 

https://twitter.com/ErikDavis/status/934978136369958912

 

"it’s about the need to share our life with another person, as well the need to not want to need to share our life with another person."

post #83 of 88

Embargo lifted. Strong reviews so far but already a couple harsh negatives, so I imagine it will be a bit divisive (not mother! divisive, though, I think most critics are gonna be on board with this one as evidenced by NBR and so forth). Sounds like the character work here is a notch above some of PTA's other work, Greenwood's score is amazing, the film looks lovely, and while DDL is supposed to be very good, Krieps goes toe-to-toe with him in the acting dept. One review says that Alma, as played by Krieps, is PTA's best female character yet. Manville is also supposed to be quite good.

 

Some quotes:

 

"This feels like the beginning of a different version of this filmmaker: one who's more mature, more confident, more open, and a director who will continue to keep surprising all of us." - FilmStage

 

"You might not recognize the love driving “Phantom Thread” forward as love, per se, but you will understand that love is expressed in so many ways, in so many forms, whether through meticulous construction or through the preparation of dinner. Love is patient, love is kind; love is haunting, and occasionally crazy. [A+]" - The Playlist, and CHUD's own Andy Crump!

 

"There is such pure delicious pleasure in this film, in its strangeness, its vehemence, its flourishes of absurdity, carried off with superb elegance." - The Guardian, 5 stars

 

"A challenging watch, but also jaw-dropping on more levels than it's possible to count." - Little White Lies

 

And a juicy negative:

 

"Feel-good" is not the sensation Anderson seeks to induce; more like, "Feel inclined to burn down the movie theater." - National Review

post #84 of 88

I sat next to someone who gave this five stars on letterboxd, and he wasn't nearly as engrossed in this movie as his review would make it seem.  I feel like alot of reviewers are absolutely determined to make themselves like PTA's movies, regardless of their actual experience while watching them.  I don't expect this movie to do well at all with audiences.  Damn good score from Greenwood though, much improved from the dissonant noise doodling from TWBB/The Master/Inherent Vice.  

post #85 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurkeyJot View Post
 

I sat next to someone who gave this five stars on letterboxd, and he wasn't nearly as engrossed in this movie as his review would make it seem.  I feel like alot of reviewers are absolutely determined to make themselves like PTA's movies, regardless of their actual experience while watching them.  I don't expect this movie to do well at all with audiences.  

 

I don't know what exactly this is supposed to mean. Are you inferring that everyone is trying to make themselves like PTA's movies?

 

Because I can assure you that I instantly and deeply loved movies like Boogie Nights, Punch Drunk Love, There Will Be Blood, The Master...

 

Magnolia and Hard Eight I'm a bit more conflicted about but both are fine movies with some incredible scenes. Tom Cruise will never be better than that scene at his father's death bed.

 

Now Inherent Vice, watched it once in the theater, was pretty disappointed (especially since I loved the book) and never returned to it. My gut reaction is something I listen to.

 

Anywho, I am just wondering how exactly you could gauge how engrossed someone was in a movie like this? It's not Marble where there's plenty of opportunities to laugh and fist-pump or whatever. Was he shifting around constantly and sighing and check his phone or something?

post #86 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasp View Post
 

 

I don't know what exactly this is supposed to mean. Are you inferring that everyone is trying to make themselves like PTA's movies?

 

Because I can assure you that I instantly and deeply loved movies like Boogie Nights, Punch Drunk Love, There Will Be Blood, The Master...

 

Magnolia and Hard Eight I'm a bit more conflicted about but both are fine movies with some incredible scenes. Tom Cruise will never be better than that scene at his father's death bed.

 

Now Inherent Vice, watched it once in the theater, was pretty disappointed (especially since I loved the book) and never returned to it. My gut reaction is something I listen to.

 

Anywho, I am just wondering how exactly you could gauge how engrossed someone was in a movie like this? It's not Marble where there's plenty of opportunities to laugh and fist-pump or whatever. Was he shifting around constantly and sighing and check his phone or something?

 

Yes, pretty much that.  Not checking his phone, but definitely moving around like he was sometimes bored.  Now, I don't know about anybody else's experience, but Boogie Nights didn't have many people sighing and checking their watches.  

post #87 of 88

The score for There Will Be Blood is fantastic.

post #88 of 88

Aww shit.  Phantom Thread in 70mm at the Music Box in Chicago. On sale now.

 

https://www.musicboxtheatre.com/films/phantom-thread 

 

Saw Hateful 8 in 70mm(glorius) and recently saw Vertigo in 70mm(outside of some visible scuffs in the print, it looked liked a brand new movie). I have some issues with the theater itself, but they are pretty much the best in the city when it comes to special events and screenings.

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