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Current reading - Page 105

post #5201 of 5237

Duma Key is good for late King. Not among my favorites of his though.

post #5202 of 5237
Speaking of Clive Barker, has he written anything decent recently?
post #5203 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcjsavannah View Post
 

Finished Chris Wooding's The Iron Jackal a couple of weeks ago and picked up the third in the series, Ace of Skulls, today. 

Actually, THE IRON JACKAL is the third in the series.  THE ACE OF SKULLS is the fourth and final book in the series.

 

RETRIBUTION FALLS

THE BLACK LUNG CAPTAIN

THE IRON JACKAL

THE ACE OF SKULLS

 

I just finished ACE OF SKULLS yesterday.  Man, I love these books.

post #5204 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

Speaking of Clive Barker, has he written anything decent recently?

 

Not that I know of. Of course opinions may differ. Either way I'm not getting anything of his until he gets off his ass and finishes the Books Of The Art. Though I may submit if the next novel is about Harry D'Amour.

post #5205 of 5237
Well it looks like you're getting Harry D'Amour AND Pinhead! THE SCARLET GOSPELS will finally be published next year.

http://www.clivebarker.info/newsscarlet.html

I've given up on the Third book of the Art.
post #5206 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrickBurgundy View Post

Actually, THE IRON JACKAL is the third in the series.  THE ACE OF SKULLS is the fourth and final book in the series.

RETRIBUTION FALLS
THE BLACK LUNG CAPTAIN
THE IRON JACKAL
THE ACE OF SKULLS

I just finished ACE OF SKULLS yesterday.  Man, I love these books.

Interesting. I read (and enjoyed) the Iron Jackal and don't feel like I missed a book in the series. Either I wasn't reading that closely or that's a mark of a good writer smile.gif
post #5207 of 5237
I started with the Iron Jackal too.

Then I got to read the other two as prequels. Worked really well for me smile.gif

Ace of Skulls is a great capper.
post #5208 of 5237

Back to reading the Complete Stories of Sherlock Holmes.

 

Stopped after 900 pages to move onto other things.  Back into it.

 

Lot of "snigger" worthy stuff because of the time the prose was written, essentially a lot of "ejaculations" rather than "exclamations",  because I have the mental age of a 12 year old this amuses me immensely.

 

'"Good God!", he ejaculated.' (teehee)

post #5209 of 5237

I finished a couple fantasy books I first heard of in this thread. First off, The Six Gun Tarot. I should have loved this, as it is so clearly influenced by a bunch of things I loved. A big fat mixture of the Dark Tower, HP Lovecraft, Deadwood and Preacher. All that stuff in the hopper should result in some genre pulp that was right up my alley, but unfortunately, the writing wasn't up to the level of its ambitions. It introduces a dozen or so fun character ideas (a native american deputy that talks to coyotes, a closeted gay mayor that collects all the most precious religious artifacts of the Mormon church, a housewife trained since childhood by a secret society of pirate assassins), and then they all remain as surface level as your average Saturday morning cartoon cast. The plotting is almost nonexistent, and the writing itself kinda sucks. Disappointing.

 

The Red Knight, on the other hand, was really good. Terrific writing there. It strikes me as the best fantasy novel I've read in the last twenty years or so (that didn't take place in Westeros, anyway). It actually feels very reminiscent of Martin, and though it doesn't have quite the knack he has for characters and plot, the prose is even better. In a nutshell, it's an epic Medieval siege between men and demons. On the one hand, it's incredibly huge in scope, dealing with dozens of characters in dozens of places, but on the other hand, it's telling one very specific story about this one siege, and everyone and everything more or less converges right there. If there's a flaw, it's that I was really engaged in it as a singular story, and in the end the book hedges its bets and lets certain plot threads trail off into the next book in the series. I would have been happy to read another book with these characters (and I will - the sequel's already out), and I didn't need the dangling narrative, especially when there was a clear ending available. Regardless, a strong recommend.

post #5210 of 5237


Snikt snikt, fnar fnar
post #5211 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post
 

 

 

The Red Knight, on the other hand, was really good. Terrific writing there. It strikes me as the best fantasy novel I've read in the last twenty years or so (that didn't take place in Westeros, anyway). It actually feels very reminiscent of Martin, and though it doesn't have quite the knack he has for characters and plot, the prose is even better. In a nutshell, it's an epic Medieval siege between men and demons. On the one hand, it's incredibly huge in scope, dealing with dozens of characters in dozens of places, but on the other hand, it's telling one very specific story about this one siege, and everyone and everything more or less converges right there. If there's a flaw, it's that I was really engaged in it as a singular story, and in the end the book hedges its bets and lets certain plot threads trail off into the next book in the series. I would have been happy to read another book with these characters (and I will - the sequel's already out), and I didn't need the dangling narrative, especially when there was a clear ending available. Regardless, a strong recommend.

 

Was in the library and couldn't remember this.  Picked up Joyland by SK instead.  But have checked online and they have this in stock, so will be heading back in 5 to pick it up :)

post #5212 of 5237
Well, if NOS-4R2 was the best non-SK, SK book ive read in a while, Joyland is hands down the best real thing. More personal books like this would be appreciated from the man.

Onto The Red Knight.
post #5213 of 5237

One chapter in and I know I'm going to love the Red Knight.


Some books I like to rip through, others I deliberately slow my reading down to savour the prose.  This is one to savour.


Thanks for the recommendation Arjen :)

post #5214 of 5237

Yeah, if you're inclined towards fantasy literature, Red Knight should be a priority. Great, dense read, and yeah, the writing itself is quite lovely, which really stands out in this genre.

 

Speaking of which, I'm on a fantasy kick right now, and I couldn't help but take advantage of the free Audible download of the collection of RA Salvatore's Drizzt stories read by geek celebrities. The centerpiece of this is without a doubt the one Ice-T reads, because holy shit that's funny, but it's got a hilarious group. I've heard the first half or so, and I have to admit, I always assumed Salvatore was probably shit because he's writing licensed fantasy, but he's not terrible at all. It's all functional, he writes action well, and it moves quick and he doesn't overwrite, which is so unusual in this genre. It's no Red Knight, but it's fine for what it is. 

 

And the hilarious cast helps. I've never been a Felicia Day fan, but she does good goblin voices, and Greg Grunberg, of all fucking people, ended up doing a really good job. He seems like he's probably done books on tape before. The standout so far though was Dan Harmon, reading as Drizzt, the mysterious drow badass, in a first person story. As a Harmontown fan, this was absolutely hilarious. But really, I'm just waiting until Ice T shows up.

post #5215 of 5237

The first three Drizzt books (Homeland, Exile and Sojourn) are actually quite good. There is a drop in the Icewind Dale trilogy (it's still good) but I haven't bought anything else of his.

post #5216 of 5237
Check out @BBCRadio4's Tweet: https://twitter.com/BBCRadio4/status/507891343470104576

Cant post photo from phone. But BBC Radio4 is adapting Good Omens! smile.gif Cast photo in link. Serafinowitz as Death??

Edit: just properly checked the photo. Theres some talent in there. Serafinowitz as Crowley and Heap as Aziraphale would be brilliant.
post #5217 of 5237
post #5218 of 5237

Tonight I had dinner at a local Sushi joint. I was enjoying my Sashimi when this Teen Couple came in and sat down, continuing a stream of conversation that no doubt had been going on for some time. The guy was quite, the girl was LOUD, so I expected an vapid inane conversation to go with my dinner.

 

Instead, they talked about the Science Fiction books they had read. The guy loved Vonnegut and asked the girl if she'd read Sirens of Titan. She had and loved it. Then she asked if he had read Asimov's Foundation Trilogy. He hadn't but both had read I, Robot.

 

And I paid my bill and left, knowing that all was right with the world.

post #5219 of 5237
Didn't know there was a new Ellroy out. Adding it to the list.

http://www.bookdepository.com/Perfidia-James-Ellroy/9780434020539
post #5220 of 5237

Oh shit.

post #5221 of 5237

I'm about halfway through The Girl with All the Gifts by Mike Carey, creator of Lucifer and the Felix Castor series. It's a post-apocalyptic tale as told from the POV of a little girl, saying anymore than that would be ruining it. I really cannot recommend it enough.

post #5222 of 5237

I haven't read that yet, but I will.  I fucking love Mike Carey. 

post #5223 of 5237

Just finished SHAMAN by Kim Stanley Robinson - the subheading says "a novel of the ice age" and it's pretty much that, story of an orphan becoming a tribe's shaman with some drama in between. No supernatural or fantastical elements (the odd ghost aside), just a tale of aboriginal life in the prehistoric age. Took a while to hook me in, but once it did, I was sold. 

 

 

Then again, I love pretty much everything KSR has done, so I'm not exactly a hard sell. 

post #5224 of 5237

No tie-ins to any of his previous works?

post #5225 of 5237
No, this one is off doing its own thing.
post #5226 of 5237

I'm neck deep in Iain M. Banks' Culture books. Finished Consider Phlebas and Player Of Games and started The State Of The Art. This is exactly my style of sci-fi.

post #5227 of 5237
Awesome. I re-read Consider Phlebas and Use of Weapons every year.

Still cant believe he's gone.

Enjoy your journey through The Culture, Stelios
post #5228 of 5237

I am. I am.

post #5229 of 5237
The Red Knight was so very, very good. Best I've read since the Malazan Book of the Fallen series. Infinitely preferred it to GRRM. I didn't share Arjen's misgivings about the ending as that was stock for me with Malazan.

But larger story aside this was just such a fantastic seige book. Real page turner.

Mr Mercedes next then I'm going to have to get The Fell Sword - follow up to Red Knight.
post #5230 of 5237
Yeah, I just wanted more with either
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Thorne or DeVrailly. It's fine that they're both still active on the board, but I wanted more of a confrontation. There'e not all that much changed by the end of what feels like such an enormous, singular event.
post #5231 of 5237
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Man, I wanted someone to really, really fuck up de Vrailly. But I did like how nearly all the Albans were so dismissive of him and clearly thought he was a dick.In a way thats more of a slight to the pompous twat than being beaten in the field.
post #5232 of 5237

Mr Mercedes wasn't my fave.  Pretty humdrum "thriller". 

 

Onto Ellroy's Perfidia.  Very excited about that.

post #5233 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

Onto Ellroy's Perfidia.  Very excited about that.
Report back. Interested to know if it's worth reading.

Loved the rest of The Girl with all the Gifts. Now onto Erik Larson's The Devil in the White City. Heard great things so really looking forward to this one.
post #5234 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post

Report back. Interested to know if it's worth reading.

Loved the rest of The Girl with all the Gifts. Now onto Erik Larson's The Devil in the White City. Heard great things so really looking forward to this one.

The funny thing about DEVIL IN TJE WHITE CITY is that I know several people who found the building the World's Fair stuff more compelling than the serial killer stuff (not that the latter isn't interesting).
post #5235 of 5237

Reading

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavez View Post


The funny thing about DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY is that I know several people who found the building the World's Fair stuff more compelling than the serial killer stuff (not that the latter isn't interesting).


 I am one of those people. I read the book in my undergrad Literary Non-Fiction class and really enjoyed the World's Fair portions more than the killer.

 

In another note, I finished The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco last week. A great read, but dense. My Latin is middling, so, I had to translate a good bit of those parts. Adso is a great audience surrogate. 

 

Then, I read Gone Girl and loved it. I think Affleck is the perfect person to play the role, and only hope they can keep the ending the same, because it is great.

post #5236 of 5237
The Magicians by Lev Grossman. I feel like I'm reading Harry Potter/Narnia fan fiction (except in this book, they fuck and do drugs!), but I have to admit, slowly but surely, it's gotten under my skin. There's an excellent cosmic horror sequence early on, and the creepiness continues to ratchet up.
post #5237 of 5237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post


Report back. Interested to know if it's worth reading.

 

 

FIVE pages in (just five) and it's a veritable who's who of the Ellroyverse.  Sgt Dudley Smith, Bucky Bleichart, Lee Blanchard, Buzz Meeks and probably more that I didn't immediately recognise.

 

The prose seems to be an ideal straddling of the more verbose LA Quartet style with the nails hard Cold 5 Thousand.  As I say, first 5 pages but it's shaping up to be vintage Ellroy.

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