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Current reading - Page 108

post #5351 of 5359

Black Dahlia was so good.  I'd forgotten so much of it.

 

Bit concerned given that it's all supposed to be one story, with Perfidia starting off an earlier LA Quartet that there is a massive discrepancy caused by something he wrote into Perfidia.  Wonder if he will address it in the later books or just "ah fuck it".

 

Onto Foxglove Summer (Peter Grant 5)

post #5352 of 5359

Black Dahilia is really, really good (and its film adaptation is really, really awful).

 

Currently getting through Perfidia, and I'm amazed at how easy it is to get back into Ellroy's pitch black world after such a long absence from those books. Really enjoying seeing all these characters bump heads with each other. Definitely going to try and read through the original trilogy.

post #5353 of 5359
Might be the sinus surgery but Big Nowhere is a lot harder to get into than BD. I remember the Meeks stuff but nothing else. It's so densely written.

Foxglove Summer was aces. Now I've caught up its the "wait for publication" game now. At least Aaronovich seems fairly prolific.
post #5354 of 5359

Finally finished Perfidia. Feels like Ellroy's greatest hits at times, but there's some quality stuff here. As with all of Ellroy's work, there's some dark, dark, absolutely bleak shit at work; but honestly, Ellroy's depiction of corruption hits a hell of a lot harder than usual. Mostly due to the timing of the novel. No doubt some of it is exaggerated for the sake of drama, but man it's hard not to feel some of this shit still goes on in, and that someone like Dudley Smith would still be considered a hero in Modern day America.

post #5355 of 5359

I just finished NOS4A2, and it was a reasonably good Stephen King pastiche. In fact, I'd say the most apt and convincing fake SK book I've read, which is hardly surprising. Hill's got the style, the plotting, and the authorial voice down pat. It's hardly a scratch on King's greatest hits, but it was every bit the equal of mid-range King, something like Duma Key, Bag of Bones, or Desperation. It's a bit overlong, with the second act stretching out forever, but once it gets where it's headed (that is to say, Christmasland), the book starts to pay off like crazy. I was practically casting the three night NBC miniseries event in my head.

post #5356 of 5359
bloody hell. I'd completely forgotten about how utterly pitch black The Big Nowhere is. It makes Black Dahlia look like a laugh riot. Took me ages to get to sleep after reading it (as an aside its weird re-reading really dense books completely sober. Everything makes a lot more sense when not filtered through a drug haze).

Ancilliary Justice next.
post #5357 of 5359

Yeah. Perfidia isn't any better. There's probably only one scene in that whole book that even remotely comes close to some satisfying retribution.

 

 

Reading Murakami's novel, "Dance, Dance, Dance." I'm just getting into it, but I'm getting tired of the much used "guy who is good at everything and can sleep with any girl he pleases--BUT HE'S SOOOOO BORED!!!" archtype that makes up the bulk of Murakami's work. Really makes it hard for me to root for his protagonists. Probably why I consider Kafka on the Shore his best work.

post #5358 of 5359

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post
 

I just finished NOS4A2, and it was a reasonably good Stephen King pastiche. In fact, I'd say the most apt and convincing fake SK book I've read, which is hardly surprising. Hill's got the style, the plotting, and the authorial voice down pat. It's hardly a scratch on King's greatest hits, but it was every bit the equal of mid-range King, something like Duma Key, Bag of Bones, or Desperation. It's a bit overlong, with the second act stretching out forever, but once it gets where it's headed (that is to say, Christmasland), the book starts to pay off like crazy. I was practically casting the three night NBC miniseries event in my head.

 

My thoughts exactly. I finished it this past weekend as well, and I kept thinking "Jesus we are meandering about aren't we? I mean the Librarian had Chekov's friggin gun on the desk and we still haven't gotten to Candyland." But I enjoyed it. I still think I liked Horns better.

 

I want to thank whoever put Wool into my brain. I saw it, NOS4A2, and Olive Kitteridge on a buy two, get one shelf, and I thoroughly liked Wool. I dug the premise and character work and would love to see a mini-series. I guess it would be similiar to Ascension on SciFi.

 

I am working my way through GWBush's biography of his dad, 41. It is by GWB, so it is nothing but praise, but I have always liked GHWB and Barbara, so the anecdotes are nice. Kittridge and As I Lay Dying are on my list after this. One for me, one to teach.

post #5359 of 5359

Picked up a 2 volume collection of Rudyard Kiplings' short stories that I've had for years (yeah I'm that guy who raids the $1 table at the used bookstore and then lets the books just sit until someday I read them).

 

Not what I expected. What I expected was a racist jingoistic apology for the British Empire. What I'm getting so far is a very cold eye'd look and implicit critique of the British empire.

 

The two short stories I've read take place during the Boer War, and Kiping has one of his British Generals straight out say that they are there to "train" their new recruits in this fake war (which involved vicious Guerilla tactics) so they can then go somewhere else to fight a "real" war.

 

The man was a good story teller, but the 19th century language, and many of the contemporary references are hard for me to grasp right away. It's like I'm reading a Science Fiction novel. More later.

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