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In The Cut

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
What did anyone think of this? I'm still making up my mind about it, as I didn't really like the resolution of the mystery. Still, the film's exploration of the dictonomy between sex and violence as well as it's emphasis on the color red (which I'm still figuring out) was fascinating to me.

What did you think?
post #2 of 7
so youre saying it wasnt as bad as everyone says it is?
post #3 of 7
The film always intrigued me, and I was in the mood to do some blind buying so I purchased the movie with little reason to.

I was quite surprised. I thought it was a damn solid flick. The film could have easily existed without the mystery thread continuing on into the third act (at least the way it ended up continuing) if you ask me. It was a "whodunnit?" where you didn't really need to know the "who?" of it. Despite that, really enjoyed it all up. Also thought Mark Ruffalo turned in a really good performance, and photography in the film was pretty damn tight.

I never thought I would end up enjoying a Meg Ryan flick.
post #4 of 7

SPOILER WARNING...

I figure red is the color of passion and also the color of blood, and the film uses it liberally because it equates the two. The ending only makes sense to me in the context of that subtext.
Frannie is surrounded by men who are attracted to her and who seem like they could be the murderer, but the one who really is is the one who seems least likely, by approaching with smiles, songs, and a ring. Love itself is symbolized by this story of how Frannie's parents got together; it's a story of betrayal, later re-envisioned as an act of careless murder. There's also this constant barrage of imagery (the 'Mom' funeral bouquet, the poetry, and the bride in the subway, Frannie's courtship charm bracelet, the toy that sings "I Think I Love You", etc.) that's reminiscent of our romantic ideals, and how out of place they seem when compared to reality.
Meanwhile, every character in the film is somehow a victim of their relationships--alpha male Malloy is sleeping on the couch, his partner had his gun taken away, Pauline has a court appointment, and Frannie has the whole film to wander dangerously towards eroticism and away from reality. But which main character has to die? The one who can't keep herself from calling her lover.

I love this film because I think that the idea is interesting, and from my own experiences, seems true. Passion invites everyone to flee from their own intelligence. I have female friends who liked In the Cut for the same reason, but I don't expect everyone to.
Also, Meg Ryan is fantastic in this. For years, the only film of hers I liked was Innerspace, but I'm a big fan of this film, as well as Hurlyburly and Kate & Leopold, and she's great in all of them. This film is also the first place I saw Mark Ruffalo, and he's incredible--in general, but particularly in this one. The music and cinematography in this film are also very good.
post #5 of 7
thats three more than the number of recommendations i saw when the movie was released.

i might just rent this
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Re: SPOILER WARNING...

Quote:
Originally posted by muncie girl
I figure red is the color of passion and also the color of blood, and the film uses it liberally because it equates the two. The ending only makes sense to me in the context of that subtext.
Frannie is surrounded by men who are attracted to her and who seem like they could be the murderer, but the one who really is is the one who seems least likely, by approaching with smiles, songs, and a ring. Love itself is symbolized by this story of how Frannie's parents got together; it's a story of betrayal, later re-envisioned as an act of careless murder. There's also this constant barrage of imagery (the 'Mom' funeral bouquet, the poetry, and the bride in the subway, Frannie's courtship charm bracelet, the toy that sings "I Think I Love You", etc.) that's reminiscent of our romantic ideals, and how out of place they seem when compared to reality.

If that's what the red meant, then why does Kevin Bacon's character put on a bright red hat in the subway, the kind of hat no one would wear with medical scrubs?

I wish more people had seen this.
post #7 of 7
I'm not sure that there's an answer to that. I don't believe that it's necessarily a significant indicator of anything specific, but rather something intended to put you in a certain frame of mind. I got the impression that Campion just wanted to saturate the whole film with these little subconscious signals and didn't have a master plan behind it. Added to which, there's a certain level of detail at which every metaphorical system falls apart, particularly in a case like this, where symbols are being used both atmospherically and as plot elements. I don't think you can expect 100% consistency, especially when the director is disavowing any interest in metaphor.
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