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post #51 of 64

Yes.  It's brief and easy, but very unique and worth checking out.

 

Unfortunately, the only version legally available (it's on Steam) is the VGA "Talkie" version.  It was the earliest attempt at voice acting for the company, and because the tech was so immature in that regard, there were two consequences.  The first is that the animators struggled with the lip synching, leading them to pitch all of the game's character close-ups.  (If you played Monkey Island 1, those are what I mean by character close-ups.)

 

The second is that all of the audio, dialog and music, is stored on one big CD track.  While this means the audio is high quality and sounds lovely, it also means that music only plays during major sequences where it's cinematically mixed with the dialog.  Worse, the dialog itself had to be rewritten in a more succinct way so that it could all fit on one CD.  (One of the writers credited with the redone script is Orson Scott Card, for the trivia junkies.)

 

While the result isn't sabotage, it is a reasonably different experience from the original game because of the retooled script.  And while the graphics upgrade is great, there is something to be said for the original 16-color EGA artwork, which did super inventive things with regard to palette and animation that can only be appreciated in the game's first-release form.  On the flipside, this the only version voiced, and the voicework is solid.

 

My advice is this: buy the game (of course), but help yourself to the unavailable original version and run it through SCUMMVM, so you can have it both ways.  And whichever version you go with, be sure to listen to the 30-minute audio drama, which originally came packaged with the game on a cassette and which serves as a prologue and introduction to the world.

 

post #52 of 64

Thanks for that, Dude! Much appreciated!!

post #53 of 64

Fatherdude did a good job of explaining the differences in versions. If I remember correctly there is a rare Japanese-only version that has the updated graphics but keeps all the original dialogue, which is arguably the best version even if it doesn't have talkie audio. The game sorely needs someone to do a loving special edition package that puts all the different versions in one place.

 

I have to say, for it's shortcomings the talkie version is probably the most enjoyable to me. You don't lose so much dialogue that it spoils the experience, and from what I remember the performances were pretty good. The game is short enough that if you enjoy it you might as well play through both versions if you can find them.

 

In general I think it gets unfairly overlooked and is the first really timeless Lucasarts adventure. Being relatively easy and having such a simple interface, it sits quite comfortably next to simpler modern adventure games. It probably won't blow your mind but if you're a Lucasarts fan you should get a lovely couple of evening's entertainment out of it.

post #54 of 64

Yeah, objectively the FM-Towns version is the best of all worlds because it's got the original script, full soundtrack and a 256 color conversion.  Just no voices.

 

I have an academic obsession with the original EGA version because of all the insane dithering techniques that Mark Ferrari pulled off despite his severe color limitations.  I wish I could find the article that explained how he basically used black magic to get some of the results that he did.  But it's probably one of those ridiculous "purists" things on my part.  I think all editions are worth checking out.

 

By the way, it seems like some diligent fan has made it quite convenient for you to upgrade/sidegrade your legal Steam copy with the FM-Towns version.

post #55 of 64

Looks like Tim Schafer will be presiding over a Grim Fandango PAX Prime panel at the end of the month.  Expect the first real details on the remaster then.

post #56 of 64

post #57 of 64

While giving Grim Fandango Remasterd a January 27th release date, Double Fine also went ahead and announced that they're making Day of the Tentacle Special Edition.

 

Ohohhoh, heh.  Ahem

post #58 of 64

Beat me to it. Hopefully this means we can enjoy a redone Full Throttle in a year or two as well.

 

A trailer for Grim Fandango Remastered is up as well. The visual improvements are pretty subtle, but why fuck with perfection I suppose. I'll be interested to see how well the point and click interface works. They should probably add some kind of hint system as well because that game was ridiculously hard.

 

Also this seems like a good place to do another plug for Ron Gilbert's new Kickstarter. Though it's already funded and personally given the retro nature of it I think I could live without voice acting stretch goal.

post #59 of 64

Ron Gilbert's Thimbleweed Park is out today, anyone going to be checking it out?

 

It seems to have been one of the more transparent and smoothly operated Kickstarter projects, at least that I've seen. They showed more info about the development process than I personally needed, but they definitely gave the impression of old hands putting all the lessons they've learned about adventure game design to use. They seem to have put an impressive amount of thought into puzzle structure and pacing and so on.

 

I sometimes wonder whether I'd have the patience to properly play through the old Lucasarts adventures properly if I was experiencing them for the first time now. I guess I'm about to find out...

post #60 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post
 

Ron Gilbert's Thimbleweed Park is out today, anyone going to be checking it out?

 

It seems to have been one of the more transparent and smoothly operated Kickstarter projects, at least that I've seen. They showed more info about the development process than I personally needed, but they definitely gave the impression of old hands putting all the lessons they've learned about adventure game design to use. They seem to have put an impressive amount of thought into puzzle structure and pacing and so on.

 

I sometimes wonder whether I'd have the patience to properly play through the old Lucasarts adventures properly if I was experiencing them for the first time now. I guess I'm about to find out...

I got in on their kickstarter, so yes, I'll be playing it.

post #61 of 64
Ah, I'll have to take a look at that, I haven't checked in on it in a while. Is it available for general purchase yet, or just to backers?
post #62 of 64

Yeah I'm pretty sure it goes on general sale at the same time.

post #63 of 64

As an original Monkey Island geek, I feel like I have to pick this up just on general principle. The reviews so far seem positive too.

post #64 of 64

I managed to get a couple of hours into it yesterday.

 

I have to admit my first impressions were slightly mixed. Brace yourself for nitpicks!

 

In the first few minutes I had: characters walking over reflective water with no reflections, something even Monkey Island 2 did. Then I picked up a discarded videogame cartridge with a "Mucasarts" gag on it, followed moments later by an explicit reference to Lucasarts in the dialogue (pick one or the other guys!), as well as a whole conversation about Monkey Island even though that game came out some years after 1987 which is when we've just been told this game is set. Yeah I know it's a fourth wall breaking gag, but even so... And then the second location you come across is a gigantic cemetery scene that takes about two minutes to traverse for the sake of one random item, and then you have to walk all the way back again. It seems like to get around the game you have to walk back and forth along gigantic horizontal scenes.

 

But once you get beyond the wordy exposition dump that is the first chunk of the game and start getting into the swing of things, it reveals itself as exactly the lost Lucasarts game it was advertised as, and it turns out they are still fun after all. So far the puzzles are about the right level for my tastes, which is to say involved enough that you don't feel like you're being led around by the hand, but not so much that you're stuck wandering around wondering what to do. Though I'm not that far into it so we'll see how hard it gets.

I know dialogue is half the appeal of these kind of things, but I maintain that the only way to play is with subtitles on and an a hand on the '.' key, because otherwise you'll spend half your life waiting for the voice actors to get to the end of a sentence.

 

Mark Ferrari remains the reigning king of pixel art backgrounds.

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