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The MICHAEL MANN Appreciation Thread - Page 15

post #701 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post


I've seen the first few episodes, but couldn't engage with the network procedural format. I've been told that it evolves away from that, but it's difficult for me to get into a show that I didn't watch from day one or that has already come and gone.

I will say that a comment Fuller made at a convention before I ever saw the show put a bad taste in my mouth. He reassured the audience that they weren't going to show rape on the show and the audience erupted in cheers. I found his statement of intent and the reaction to it to be bizarre and bordering on offensive given my ambivalence about romanticizing serial killers. I get what you guys are saying about his approach and that all sounds interesting, but it's a little difficult for me to reconcile my knowledge of the reality of what those people are like with what Fuller wanted to sell to his audience. It suggested to me that Fuller wanted his (specifically female) audience to "comfortably" engage with this romantic, poetic notion of what a serial killer is and I wasn't feeling it.*

When I read the details about what people like Ted Bundy did (which I don't do anymore because it's too upsetting), the desire to see them recontextualized into something other than what they are is a difficult leap to make.

Now, I will not claim total consistency on this and I fully support an artist's decision to do as he / she will, unrestrained by whatever the culture says to do or not do, but I have to be in the proper headspace for it. It just so happens that the serial killer, as a subject of genre, is something that I still have misgivings about.




 
*This is, after all, the very reason all of Harris' antagonists who aren't Lector are rapists, pederasts, or fixated on some sexual / gender issue. It's a transparent device, the "ick factor" that's supposed to make Lector seem reasonable next to them.

 

 

I enjoyed Hannibal on an artistic level; but it's very much a fable or allegory, not a procedural based in reality.  The various Hannibal filmmakers, post-Manhunter, were quick to abandon any of the psychopathology behind cannibalism.  These killers have extremely low opinions of themselves, lower than dog crap, and their actions are a way of proving that fact to themselves.  Literally, the scum of the earth.  Far removed from the Turbo-charged Jag driving, fine-wine consuming academic we saw in the later works.    

 

Anyhow, an interview with Dante Spinotti:

 

https://thefilmstage.com/features/dante-spinotti-on-michael-manns-preparedness-remastering-classics-and-new-technologies/


 

Quote:

Mann is so known for his sense of control. Did you feel a change in workflow when moving from film to digital?

 

I know Michael very well. We are friends and have been friends for a long, long time. Michael is, for sure, the kind of director who, if you agree with him and understand what he has in mind to do, you can work with him. If you are someone who discusses or does disagree, you better not do that. You don’t need to step into a hard time. So if you agree and understand, it’s all fine — and you like it. If you agree with something, you like it. I always found, even when I did my first movie with Michael… the way I describe it is that, for me, coming from Italy and some good television, he was like finding a way of making movies that maybe I dreamed of, in my mind, but that I actually never worked on. It’s kind of interesting. He was great, and I have always highly admired him; I learned a lot from Michael Mann. It was always an operation that needed quite a bit of concentration to make it happen.

 

post #702 of 747
Haven't seen Subotai around much lately, so I'm posting this interview with Mann in his name!

ALI on bluray... but in another new cut by Mann. The third version of the film by him:

http://www.villagevoice.com/film/free-is-real-and-real-is-a-motherfucker-michael-mann-on-ali-15-years-later-9576611
post #703 of 747

Nooj, MANY thanks.  What a great interview.  I haven't seen Ali in quite some years, but I've caught bits and pieces more recently.  I'll definitely pick up a new cut.  Reading Mann give voice to the subtle conscience of the film is both useful and meaningful.  I'm excited to watch it again.  I recall that it was a near masterpiece when I first saw it (not in theaters, sadly), so I look forward to the revisit.

post #704 of 747
It's strange and cool to see a prolific filmmaker remain so excited by the material 15 years after its release.
post #705 of 747

FERRARI looks to be back on track:

 

http://deadline.com/2017/03/hugh-jackman-michael-mann-noomi-rapace-ferrari-1202039278/

 

Quote:
 Michael Mann’s Ferrari is revving again, with Hugh Jackman now in talks to play Enzo Ferrari, and Noomi Rapace to play his estranged wife Linda. Their relationship, as fiery and combustible as the race cars that Ferrari designed, plays a big part in the script Mann wrote. They have loosely been discussing this teaming for months, and now things are starting to move for a summer 2018 production start. This comes as Jackman’s final Wolverine turn, Logan, has become a box office juggernaut, grossing north of $250 million worldwide in its first week and about to pass $100 million in domestic grosses.
post #706 of 747
Great news. Excited to see Jackman in a Mann movie. Even if he took the job so that he could wolf down as much pasta as he wants.
post #707 of 747

My only issue with the news is production not starting until Summer of '18. Too much time for "creative differences" and "scheduling conflicts" to pop up.

post #708 of 747

I know next to nothing about Ferrari, but Jackman is an inherently warmer presence on film than Bale.

post #709 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil spurn View Post

I know next to nothing about Ferrari, but Jackman is an inherently warmer presence on film than Bale.
Absolutely. I'm glad it worked out this way.
post #710 of 747

Daniel Day Lewis would have been a better choice, but I guess he's too busy being Ron Swanson or working with PTA.

post #711 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

Daniel Day Lewis would have been a better choice, but I guess he's too busy being Ron Swanson or working with PTA.
DDL is almost always a better choice for ANY role.

But Jackman has that movie star charisma, which arguably makes him a better fit for late-period Mann than DDL, whose actorliness might not be well-served by the approach Mann has taken in his past few pictures.
post #712 of 747
Maybe, but it's going to take heaven and earth shifting for me to buy Jackman as a mid-twentieth century northern Italian in late middle age. Day Lewis could pull that off.

Off the top of my head, Hanks would be better; as would Colin Firth.

Not knocking Jackman. He's a decent actor with some stardust. I just don't see him in this.
post #713 of 747
I've read rumors here and there that The Keep is getting a blu ray release via Olive sometime this year. I've NEVER seen it so I really hope that he doesn't recut it. Or if he does that it includes both versions because I want to see what audiences saw in 1983 first and foremost. This release is a big deal for me if it actually comes to pass..
post #714 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

Maybe, but it's going to take heaven and earth shifting for me to buy Jackman as a mid-twentieth century northern Italian in late middle age. Day Lewis could pull that off.

Off the top of my head, Hanks would be better; as would Colin Firth.

Not knocking Jackman. He's a decent actor with some stardust. I just don't see him in this.
I think that's fair.

I'm not interested in this as a biopic, though. I'm interested in it as Mann film about cars. Hopefully, it will be a kind of spiritual successor to GRAND PRIX. In keeping with that, I kinda welcome a strong dose of Hollywoodishness.
post #715 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

I think that's fair.

I'm not interested in this as a biopic, though. I'm interested in it as Mann film about cars. Hopefully, it will be a kind of successor to GRAND PRIX. So, I kinda welcome a strong dose of Hollywoodishness.

At the risk of sounding dull, I agree. Mostly. It still needs a performance that can help me suspend disbelief; unless Mann makes a point of the evident artificiality. I love the man's work, but I've always thought of him as an immersive not distancing filmmaker.

Still, if we get something of the old Mann back in this, it'll be worth it to see if Jackman can pull it off.

ETA part of the reason I'm being skeptical is that of all of the elements that a strong director like Mann brings to a film, it's his casting that has been the most egregiously off beam for the last few films. What I admire about him in the past isn't just his style, his ability to tell a story and his unflinching commitment to throughly understanding and communicating character, but also his casting and music choices. From Manhunter to Miami Vice, his leading and ensemble choices were totally on point (yes, even Farrell whose soulfulness worked really well with the same but different update he achieved in that film). Depp, Bale and Hemsworth were disasters though, and really impacted the films, exposing a fatal flaw in endeavours that were already wobbly to start with.

I don't see him arresting that trend here. Even if you are just looking at this for his take on a car movie - which I can completely understand - because of the period nature you need a bit more effort to create verisimilitude in a way that casting actors like McQueen, Garner and Montand just achieves by them being such products of their time in a film set contemporaneously (plus the first two were petrolheads, so they had that to help sell the fantasy as well).
Edited by jhp1608 - 3/9/17 at 3:27pm
post #716 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

I love the man's work, but I've always thought of him as an immersive not distancing filmmaker.
I've always found his work very, very artificial (even though I'm sure he doesn't intend it that way). It was off-putting to me for a while.

I don't ever buy into his movies as creating a kind of reality. It's too mannered. They all have a pungent MOVIENESS about them that borders on being stilted. It's all unreal and visceral and striking, which is what I love about his work.
Edited by Agentsands77 - 3/10/17 at 9:16am
post #717 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post


I've always found his work very, very artificial (even though I'm sure he doesn't intend it that way). It was off-putting to me for a while.
 

 

 

Really? Even Last of the Mohicans? That didn't feel artificial to me in the least. Certainly not on the level of Miami Vice (the movie) or even Collateral. I think his work suffered from artificiality after he went all digital after (or starting with?) Ali. Which, in particular, left me kinda cold.

post #718 of 747

Hannah and McCauley are coming back to your big screen.

 

Michael Mann’s HEAT to Screen Nationwide Ahead of New Home Release

http://variety.com/2017/film/news/michael-mann-heat-nationwide-screenings-dvd-blu-ray-1202391981/

post #719 of 747

http://deadline.com/2017/04/hue-1968-michael-mann-michael-de-luca-mark-bowden-event-miniseries-vietnam-tet-offensive-1202076136/

 

Quote:
Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have acquired rights to Hue 1968, and they will shape as an event eight- to 10-hour miniseries Mark Bowden’s kaleidoscopic account of the Tet Offensive that became the turning point of American involvement in the Vietnam War. Bowden’s books have been catnip for Hollywood, and his Black Hawk Down was turned into the memorable Ridley Scott-directed 2001 thriller. Bowden worked five years on Hue 1968, which will be published June 6 by Grove Atlantic. Mann plans to direct numerous episodes of the mini and will produce with De Luca.

 

Quote:
Mann called the book “a masterpiece of intensely dramatic non-fiction. Bowden’s achievement is in making “them” into us,” said Mann. “We are them. There are no background people; people abstracted into statistics, body counts. There is the sense that everybody is somebody, as each is in the reality of his or her own life. The brilliance of Bowden’s narrative, the achievement of interviewing hundreds of people on all sides and making their human stories his foundation, is why Huế1968 rises to the emotional power and universality of For Whom The Bell Tolls and All Quiet On The Western Front.”

 

Hope this is on a fast track.

post #720 of 747
Me too. Sounds fascinating. I was hoping Mann would return to TV. Much easier to get off the ground. I just hope there aren't any horses in it.
post #721 of 747

http://deadline.com/2017/04/heat-prequel-novel-michael-mann-reed-farrel-coleman-co-writing-robert-deniro-al-pacino-1202078228/#comments

 

Quote:
After a long manhunt that involved months of interviews with substantial authors, Michael Mann has found his co-writer for the prequel novel to Mann’s landmark crime film Heat. Writing with Mann will be Reed Farrel Coleman, the four-time Edgar Award-nominated author who is up for the award tonight for his 2016 novel Where It Hurts, part of mystery series that revolves around the retired Suffolk County cop Gus Murphy. Coleman will collaborate with Mann to tell an origin story involving the characters that populated the Al Pacino-Robert De Niro-led ensemble drama that Mann scripted, directed and produced. The novel will be published next year under the Michael Mann imprint at William Morrow/HarperCollins.
post #722 of 747
He's a good writer. Good news.

Just wonder what the non-fiction book is.
post #723 of 747
FX will be showing the *director's cut* of BLACKHAT tomorrow at 7 EST.
post #724 of 747

Hmmm, guess this will be a chance to give the flick another shot. Bummer it'll be with a bunch of commercials. Hopefully it's not edited for content. Judging by what F/X let fly on The Feud I can't think of any content they'd edit anymore.

post #725 of 747
post #726 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

From last year, a festival screening of BLACKHAT DC:

http://www.indiewire.com/2016/02/theres-a-new-version-of-michael-manns-blackhat-and-its-really-different-124860/

 

This line from the piece

 

"Once you’re discharged from the responsibilities of plot, it’s easier to savor its details, especially the way Mann pays special attention to the act of people thinking on screen."

 

really sums up what I find distinctive and exciting about the way Michael Mann portrays his characters. He shows thought and intelligence visually better than most anyone. I keep thinking of things like the walk though of the toilet paper in the FBI building in Manhunter or the scene at the docks in Heat or the opening scene in the club in Miami Vice. The way he edits around body language, glances and looks to portray that his characters are thinking and how clearly they are thinking is quite incredible.

post #727 of 747

The new Heat Blu-Ray looks pretty great. The transfer isn't a huge leap in quality, but I think it's a step up from the earlier release. The new Blu also includes a one-hour conversation between Mann, Deniro, Pacino and Christopher Nolan.

post #728 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

FX will be showing the *director's cut* of BLACKHAT tomorrow at 7 EST.

 

well shit, bummed that I missed this.  I enjoyed BLACKHAT a lot more than I thought I would.

post #729 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

The new Heat Blu-Ray looks pretty great. The transfer isn't a huge leap in quality, but I think it's a step up from the earlier release. The new Blu also includes a one-hour conversation between Mann, Deniro, Pacino and Christopher Nolan.

 

By earlier release do you mean the earlier Blu Ray? I'm still running off the special edition DVD so an improvement over that would be nice.

post #730 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

 

well shit, bummed that I missed this.  I enjoyed BLACKHAT a lot more than I thought I would.

 

I've been meaning to give it another go. I think Hemsworth's chance at leading man status has come and gone but I find him a more appealing presence even when mildly miscast than a lot of more bankable stars out there.

post #731 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

 

well shit, bummed that I missed this.  I enjoyed BLACKHAT a lot more than I thought I would.

 

Knowing F/X they'll likely be showing it a ton. It's running again on Sunday night. I assume it'll be the director's cut again.

post #732 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post
 

 

I think Hemsworth's chance at leading man status has come and gone but I find him a more appealing presence even when mildly miscast than a lot of more bankable stars out there.

 

I get the sense that he's joined Russell Crowe on the 'once a leading man' pile.  It's a shame because I think he's got the goods (I'm on record that RUSH is a favorite).

post #733 of 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

By earlier release do you mean the earlier Blu Ray? I'm still running off the special edition DVD so an improvement over that would be nice.

I assume he does and yes, it's a noticeable improvement. Sharper, more colourful and no 'ghosting', like when De Niro gets off the train at the beginning.

Can't think why they didn't release it in 4K. Not that I'm going to get a 4K player anytime soon.
post #734 of 747

Yes, I meant the earlier Blu-Ray. It's a big step up from the DVD. For those with the older Blu, it ports the same extras over and adds the Nolan interview and another 30 minute interview with Mann.

post #735 of 747

F/X will air Mann's Vietnam-set limited series:

 

http://deadline.com/2017/07/mark-bowden-hue-1968-fx-tet-offensive-limited-series-michael-mann-michael-de-luca-1202124098/

 

Quote:
In a competitive situation, FX has landed the rights to turn the Mark Bowden bestseller Hue 1968 into a limited event series that will span eight-10 hours. Michael Mann and Michael De Luca will creatively quarterback the adaptation of Bowden’s kaleidoscopic account of the bloody siege that became the turning point of American involvement in the Vietnam War. Mann plans to direct multiple installments of the series, including the opener, and he will produce alongside De Luca and FX Productions. The hope is to be shooting by year’s end in Asia. The book was just published to critical acclaim by Grove Atlantic.
post #736 of 747
Cool, reading it right now. Betting that it will be a more honest adaptation than BHD.
post #737 of 747

 

 

 

 

post #738 of 747
So Vin Diesel wants to reboot Miami Vice. This is what happens when people patronize shit like the Fast and the Furious.
post #739 of 747

From Diesel and the guy who wrote 6 Fast and Furious films.  And Gang Related.  And Wanted.  And 47 Ronin.

post #740 of 747

47 Ronin. Hoo boy. I know blame rightly lands on multiple parties there, but holy fuck what a terrible movie.

post #741 of 747
Yeah, I had to see 47 Ronin to believe it. I was told over and over what an awful waste of time it was. Rarely do I see something so bad that I regret watching it or trying to watch it but....yeah..
post #742 of 747

Wonder how it works in terms of whether Mann had to give his blessing for this? Since the show was from his production company doesn't he have at least some say in whether this can happen? Not sure how that all works.

 

Hopefully this gets passed on like that "Daughter of Magnum P.I." thing that was chatted up a while back.

post #743 of 747
Mann was always the driving force behind Vice, but he was always clear that Anthony Yerkovich created the show. Not sure if Mann has any sort of control, although I can't imagine him even giving his blessing to this creative team.
post #744 of 747

So, this is happening (emphasis mine):

 

Quote:
On the face of it, you probably couldn’t imagine two filmmakers more dissimilar than Guillermo del Toro and Michael Mann. The former creates intricate fantasy worlds, weaving fairy tales and dark-edged stories, with his own distinct fingerprint and creative spirit. The latter is a filmmaker who studies characters obsessed with process, shoots with precision, and places an emphasis on realism. However, both filmmakers are immaculate craftsmen, which makes this next bit of news tremendously exciting.

 

At the Lumière Film Festival, Cannes honcho Thierry Fremaux presented the recent director’s cut of Michael Mann’s “Heat,” and revealed a fascinating nugget of information: Guillermo del Toro is making a documentary about Michael Mann.

 

https://theplaylist.net/guillermo-del-toro-michael-mann-20171016/

post #745 of 747

Terrific news. Will be all over that.

post #746 of 747

Does not compute.  I'll definitely be on it.

post #747 of 747
Interesting. Should be a good watch.

Guillermo did a cool interview with the Coens on the Inside Llewyn Davis criterion blu. He knows what kind of questions to ask.
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