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post #147901 of 152250

Thanks a lot! I had 3 of them in my list and the most famous one is a fan of the film but I don't have high hopes for him or his entourage to respond, got a few more ideas too so we'll see! 

post #147902 of 152250

Rolled out to the Video store....

 

 

Grabbed the Mike Mendez/ Dolph film DON'T KILL IT. Not sure if I'll get to it right away... because following along with this triple bill is on for tonite (all VHS):

 

Is Mom Dating a Serial Killer?

A grindhouse trio of deadly mysteries.

 

http://thenewbev.com/blog/2017/05/scream-for-help/

 

"For some teenage girls, the first Tuesday night of June would be spent lounging by a pool, but on June 6th at the New Beverly, the three plucky heroines of our Grindhouse TRIPLE feature will be fleeing from pools of blood! We’re gathering together three rarely-screened ‘80s horror dramas from three underappreciated masters of terror, all about every latchkey child’s nightmare, in an evening that will make you want to delete your parent’s Zoosk account. You could call our show the “Deadly Nancy Drew Mysteries” or the “New Bad News Daddies” or the “Is Mom Dating a Serial Killer” marathon!"

post #147903 of 152250

Hey, Eko: you buy a lot of CODERED stuff - is Blu of HIDE AND GO SHRIEK worth it or should I go with new re-mastered DVD?

 

 

Also, this is fun for fans of FRIGHT NIGHT:

 

https://twitter.com/_RyanTurek/status/870860991742869504

post #147904 of 152250

Priscilla Page Twitter Truth: "Kurt Russell mentioned at a Q&A with James Gunn last year that Jack Burton was a blend of Jack Nicholson, John Wayne, & himself."

 

I'll have to see if I can pick out the Jack Nicholson touches next viewing.

post #147905 of 152250

Re-run from last year of Uncle Crizzle's ranking of every Tom Cruise movie:

 

Entertainment

All 37 Tom Cruise Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best

 

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/best-and-worst-tom-cruise-movies-of-all-time

 

FAR AND AWAY is the usual consensus for Tom's worst, but I saw recently Roger Avary give it 3 1/2 stars. I kind of want to revisit it.

post #147906 of 152250

A new Steven Seagal TV series is in the works.

http://www.digitaltveurope.net/701641/polands-filmbox-to-coproduce-steven-seagal-drama/

 

Quote:
General Commander follows the missions of a top secret, rogue international paramilitary unit that fights major criminal organisations in a bid to stop World War III. Bey Logan will be sharing writing duties.
post #147907 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

Wow! Al Pacino made a surprise appearance for New Bev double bill of PANIC IN NEEDLE PARK and SCARECROW.  He sat down for a q & a with QT.  I hope interview shows up on YT because I'm a huge fan of both films, and they're rarely talked about.

 

I'm a fan of both films.  Panic in Needle Park is one of the more baffling 'PG' films ever. 

 

It would be great if we could hear more about these films from Pacino. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post

 

You should check out Pare opposite Lundgren in DIRECT CONTACT. Plays a very explosive character.

 

Yeah......

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrichead View Post

 

Bosch - watched season 2 and 3. A pretty good show here. I liked the guy playing J. Edgar from when he was on The Wire. I'm glad he's working here. There are a few threads dangling, so we'll see if they do a season 4.

 

Season 4 was a go before Season 3 had even aired.  Hence, the open threads at the end. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jox View Post
 

I've never seen CON AIR.

(I meant to prior to THE EXPENDABLES 2 but never got it.)

 

I saw this on the big screen recently and it totally held up for me. 

 

You will know very quickly if the film is going to work for you or not. I would say give it 10 minutes. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

MANDY: (Battle Axes + Demon Bikers + Nicolas Cage) x Panos Cosmatos = Take Our Money!

 

This is very promising.  Cosmatos needs to make sure that things aren't as needlessly obscured like with Beyond the Black Rainbow. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jox View Post
 

Which renown director or star should I reach out to write a foreword in my PUNISHER book?

(I have my list but I'm wondering if you have other ideas I haven't thought of -- of course not someone from the cast & crew)

 

John Hyams would be perfect. 

post #147908 of 152250

Saw that Prime has added Van Damme's DESERT HEAT, though they have it under the common overseas title INFERNO. Wasn't fond of it way back when it first hit video. I'll probably revisit it at some point.

post #147909 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Not sure if I'll get to it right away... because following along with this triple bill is on for tonite (all VHS):

 

I've only heard of one of those three; I imagine you'll have a good time with that. As I've said before, I should do theme nights like that myself while at home or, if possible, at the local cineplex.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Also, this is fun for fans of FRIGHT NIGHT:

 

It's nice that someone shot video of it and it got uploaded so the hardcores could see it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

All 37 Tom Cruise Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best

 

What I've heard of The Mummy, while Cruise is fine in it, a lot of people don't like the film, so it is likely to be near the bottom of a current iteration of this list. It sounds like a real mess. I heard from one review that it even rips off a famous horror film from a few decades ago, and rather obviously. However, those that loved Russell Crowe in The Man With The Iron Fists... I also heard he delivers quite the performance, probably also based on Oliver Reed.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post

A new Steven Seagal TV series is in the works.

 

I am not surprised to hear he would want to go down that avenue again.

 

I won't be watching any films tonight, but I did go out a little earlier. I went to Universal Studios CityWalk; I walked around and got some exercise. I also had some food & drink, which probably negates the exercise... I had some frozen yogurt then I went into their Mexican restaurant to have a tequila-based drink (it was good) and I don't know if it was given to me just because, but I was given some chips & salsa for free, which of course I did appreciate.

post #147910 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

Priscilla Page Twitter Truth: "Kurt Russell mentioned at a Q&A with James Gunn last year that Jack Burton was a blend of Jack Nicholson, John Wayne, & himself."

 

I'll have to see if I can pick out the Jack Nicholson touches next viewing.

 

It's the voice.

post #147911 of 152250

Watched a low budget movie on Netflix called Timelapse.

 

A trio of people living together discover that their neighbor has developed a camera that can take a photo 24 hrs into the future.

 

Of course they try to use it for the wrong reasons and shit goes bad, as it always does.

 

Not bad for a lightweight budget movie, but I'm a sucker for time travel stuff.

 

Every movie seems to handle it differently, but I'm still all in for this kind of thing.

post #147912 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post
 

Saw that Prime has added Van Damme's DESERT HEAT, though they have it under the common overseas title INFERNO. Wasn't fond of it way back when it first hit video. I'll probably revisit it at some point.

INFERNO (original title although the first script was actually COYOTE MOON) / DESERT HEAT is far from a "great film" and also suffered from various issues behind the scenes, but it has a unique charm that wins over, and it's enjoyable enough to watch it again every now and then... 

I mean it's YOJIMBO remade by ROCKY / KARATE KID John G. Avildsen with JCVD as a lonesome cowboy / coyote saved from himself by Danny Trejo, all underscored by Bill Conti! :D Oh and it's co-produced by PM Entertainment (which I think did a lot of wrong to them because too big of a film for them)!

post #147913 of 152250

Farewell to a true legend...

 

 

He was the bomb.

post #147914 of 152250
And some days, you just can't get rid of one.
post #147915 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post

Farewell to a true legend...




He was the bomb.

Alot of people complain about the end of TDKR... I always liked it.
post #147916 of 152250

A very sad loss, but truly an epic journey.  It gives me great comfort that he was sincerely appreciated while he was alive and got to see it. 

 

I was going to be meeting him at The London Film and Comic Con next month. I am sad that I will never have the chance now. 

post #147917 of 152250

A few years ago I went to Reno for a convention where West was slated to appear. Was bummed to find out upon arrival that he had cancelled. Can't say I blame him though. If I reach my mid-80's I sure as heck won't be looking to spend a cold weekend in Reno.

 

Used to watch Batman on Sunday mornings all the time. Then recall when the '89 film came out that they did a marathon of the 60's series. Good times.

 

post #147918 of 152250
When I attended my first Comic Con in Austin, he and Burt Ward were there. This was in 2010. I got to see him, and actually walked by him as he was speaking with some fans. I wish I'd gotten a picture with him then, but I told myself that I may have another opportunity down the line. When I went back the next year he wasn't there. I'd also been meaning to get that DVD set from his official store that was him reminiscing about all the Batman tv show episodes. Humorously enough it was called Adam Weet Naked. I kept putting it off because of the price for the signed version. Now I wish I'd just gotten it when I first discovered it a few years ago. RIP Adam West. Like many others I watched the Batman tv show as a kid and to my daughter he was Batman as far as she was concerned. She loves watching the show ever since I bought the blu-ray collection.
post #147919 of 152250

Sad to hear about Adam West...

 

 

 

On another note, here's the Weathers / Lundgren panel at Alamo City Comic Con a couple weeks ago...

 

 

post #147920 of 152250

Saw the new Resident Evil: Vendetta CGI film yesterday.

 

It's more focused towards the spooky horror aspect of the series. I enjoyed it more than the last Paul W Anderson installment (though that's not a high bar).

post #147921 of 152250

I hadn't mentioned this yet, but last night Vanessa and I saw Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2. It was a total spur of the moment thing, and we both had a blast with the movie. I'd heard already that the movie wasn't too good, but I honestly thought it was better than the last film. Lots of humor, and seeing Sly show up with Rooker on a snowy planet was great. Naturally during all three times that Sly showed up Vanessa perked up since she's all about him. It had a whole lot of heart in it, and there were quite a few teary moments towards the end of the film. I also laughed at the music player gag at the end of the film. I don't want to ruin it for those that haven't seen it yet. I was wondering just how they'd have songs in the next film and that solves that issue.

 

I liked how they de-aged Kurt Russell for the 1980 stuff, but I also noticed that that wasn't 1980 Kurt Russell. Looked more like 1990 Kurt Russell. Still, it was cool, but the benchmark for de-aging in the Marvel films is Michael Douglas in Ant-Man.

post #147922 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
 

Saw the new Resident Evil: Vendetta CGI film yesterday.

 

It's more focused towards the spooky horror aspect of the series. I enjoyed it more than the last Paul W Anderson installment (though that's not a high bar).

 

 

 

That's great to hear, felix! I know that they're going to do a one night only theatrical screening of the CGI film on June 19th. I'm planning on attending it like I did last year when they showed Batman: The Killing Joke.

post #147923 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post

I hadn't mentioned this yet, but last night Vanessa and I saw Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2. It was a total spur of the moment thing, and we both had a blast with the movie. I'd heard already that the movie wasn't too good, but I honestly thought it was better than the last film. Lots of humor, and seeing Sly show up with Rooker on a snowy planet was great. Naturally during all three times that Sly showed up Vanessa perked up since she's all about him. It had a whole lot of heart in it, and there were quite a few teary moments towards the end of the film. I also laughed at the music player gag at the end of the film. I don't want to ruin it for those that haven't seen it yet. I was wondering just how they'd have songs in the next film and that solves that issue.

I liked how they de-aged Kurt Russell for the 1980 stuff, but I also noticed that that wasn't 1980 Kurt Russell. Looked more like 1990 Kurt Russell. Still, it was cool, but the benchmark for de-aging in the Marvel films is Michael Douglas in Ant-Man.

I'm glad you picked up on the very obvious Cliffhanger homage, except this time, it's Gabe pissed at Hal about the past.

Rooker and Kurt (one of the best Marvel villains) are highlights, as was Dave Bautista. ESPECIALLY Rooker. I'm elated we have reached a summer where the erstwhile Henry Lee Lucas has a major role in a blockbuster.

De-aged Kurt had some wonky bits, but the tech looked pretty goddamn good. I don't think they used 90's Kurt though. They had to be using Escape from New York and Used Cars as reference points.

How did you like his Tarantino-esque "Brandy" monologue?
post #147924 of 152250

Monday, June 5, 2017

 

 

24 Hours of Movies: Burt

 

by Patrick Bromley

 

http://www.fthismovie.net/2017/06/24-hours-of-movies-burt.html

 

"Mustaches and chewing gum for everyone.

 

Today is Burt Reynolds Day for #Junesploitation, and there is no better way to celebrate the career of one of the all-time great movie stars than by watching 24 consecutive hours of his films. The highs. The lows. The outtakes."

 

10 a.m. - Hooper (1978, dir. Hal Needham)

 

"I know we should probably kick it off with Smokey and the Bandit, as it's the first and still best-loved collaboration between Burt and stuntman-turned-director Hal Needham, the Scorsese to Burt's De Niro. Instead, let's start with their second movie together: Hooper, a celebration of old-school stuntmen and features one of Burt's most laid back, "I don't give a shit" performances (even though he really does give a shit). He plays the top stuntman in Hollywood whose days are numbered because of the physical demands on his aging body and the fact that he's being pushed out by newcomer Jan-Michael Vincent. It's the same celebration of good ol' boy humor that Burt and Hal Needham made again and again, but I love how this movie celebrates some of the unsung artists of cinema, coming from a director and a star who know their way around this stuff. Hooper was one of the highest-grossing movies of 1978, proof that Burt could do no wrong in his prime."

 

9 p.m. - Smokey and the Bandit (1977, dir. Hal Needham)

 

"And here it is! The first and most famous of all the collaborations between Burt and former stuntman-turned-director Hal Needham (here making his debut behind the camera), Smokey and the Bandit is both a super fun and entertaining car chase movie and the film that taught Burt Reynolds that he need only coast on his charm to have a big box office hit. It worked here, but would prove to be his undoing over the course of the next decade. The plot is simple: Burt is the Bandit, a fast driver who takes a bunch of money to haul a bunch of beer from one place to another. Burt distracts the cops (Jackie Gleason, having a great time) while his buddy Jerry Reed drives the truck full of beer. Yes, it's dumb, but it's impossible to dislike. Plus, OMG Sally Field in this movie. I mean, OMG Sally Field now, too, but OMG Sally Field in this movie. To get a sense of just how popular this movie was, the only film to outgross it in 1977 was something called Star Wars."

 

11 p.m. - Malone (1987, dir. Harley Cokeliss)

 

"The heyday of Burt's career was behind him by the mid to late '80s, resulting in a series of action movies that felt increasingly cheap and schlocky -- stuff like Malone, an adaptation of William Wingate's novel Shotgun (anyone else noticing how many of Burt's movies began as books?). He's a former CIA operative who stumbles upon a sleepy Oregon town and finds lodging with Scott Wilson and daughter Cynthia Gibb. Cliff Robertson is the asshole politician trying to take over the town and run Wilson out of business, so Burt fights back. It's a movie we've seen dozens of times and Burt seems actively bored on occasion, but there's enough '80s action movie charm and the kind of no-bullshit attitude that marks the best stuff of this period of Burt's career to make me really enjoy it. The later it gets and the longer we've been watching these movies, the less we want to be challenged to really think. Malone fits that bill."

 

2:30 a.m. - Sharky's Machine (1981, dir. Burt Reynolds)

 

"Much as I enjoy Burt's Hal Needham comedies of the late '70s and early '80s, I'm much more a fan of his violent '80s cop thrillers like Malone, Heat, Stick and, best of all, Sharky's Machine. Based on William Diehl's crime novel of the same name, the movie casts Burt as the titular Sharky, who gets involved with a hooker (Rachel Ward) while trying to take down a crime boss. This is Burt's best work as a director -- a little overlong, but tough and violent and sleazy and badass. Bernie Casey almost steals the whole movie from my boy Burt (in particular during a scene after he's shot and won't stop talking to Sharky, who is attempting to give chase), but this is ultimately Burt's show. He's generous in the way he showcases the ensemble, but it's his grit and determination that carries us through the plot. I love this movie. It's my favorite Burt."

 

7:00 a.m. - Boogie Nights (1997, dir. Paul Thomas Anderson)

 

"While it may break my heart not to have the time to program stuff like The Man Who Loved Cat Dancing or Stroker Ace, there is no other way to end this Burt marathon than with Boogie Nights, not just one of the great American movies of the last 30 years and one of my all-time favorites but also the culmination of Burt Reynolds' entire career. His iconography is so linked to '70s cinema and his status as a sex symbol so legendary (see the photo at the top of this piece) that the movie manages to self-reflexively comment on Reynolds' filmography without ever commenting on it, exploiting his persona without ever exploiting it. His work as Jack Horner, an adult filmmaker who is at the top of his game in the '70s but spends the '80s trying to find his place within the industry, is the best performance of Burt's career. He even received a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination for his work. It's too bad he shit talked both the movie and PTA, with whom he famously almost came to blows during production. This is, I suspect, the last great Burt we're going to get, but we're lucky to have it.

I like to show something emotional and cathartic to end these marathons, and you don't get a lot more emotional and cathartic than the three-hour journey of Boogie Nights. And, truth be told, I couldn't resist the urge to end a 24-hour marathon of Burt Reynolds movie on a shot of a great big dick."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
post #147925 of 152250

I stand by HELL UP IN HARLEM as one of the great Action sequels of alltime. Gritty and nasty.  Exciting Hospital escape has this almost Cinéma vérité feel.

 

 

Larry Cohen's only mistake was rejecting James Brown's "The Big Payback".

post #147926 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterTarantino View Post


I'm glad you picked up on the very obvious Cliffhanger homage, except this time, it's Gabe pissed at Hal about the past.

Rooker and Kurt (one of the best Marvel villains) are highlights, as was Dave Bautista. ESPECIALLY Rooker. I'm elated we have reached a summer where the erstwhile Henry Lee Lucas has a major role in a blockbuster.

De-aged Kurt had some wonky bits, but the tech looked pretty goddamn good. I don't think they used 90's Kurt though. They had to be using Escape from New York and Used Cars as reference points.

How did you like his Tarantino-esque "Brandy" monologue?

 

 

Could have just been me, but it didn't look like early 80's Kurt Russell. His face looked a bit more...aged rather than smooth and boyish like it did back then.

 

The "Brandy" monologue was pretty good. I liked how he was all "ah, gee whiz!" with his performance. Even when it turns out he's the villain, he's not all "ARRRG I MUST DESTROY YOU, QUILL!!!!" Well, except for the part where he tells him he'll just have to spend his time as a battery. Russell turned in what is probably THE best villain of a Marvel movie this side of Redford in The Winter Soldier. I agree on Bautista. His hearty laugh at everything was infectious and had us all laughing in the theater.

 

Seeing Vol. 2, I just can't wait until the Guardians meet up with the rest of the MCU's cast. Especially RDJ as Stark. OH how he will have a field day meeting Rocket Racoon, Groot, Gamora, and Drax.

 

 

I revisited the movie The Gate earlier on the new blu-ray. Still a sold "hard" PG-13 rated film. You can tell it's aimed at kids, but as they say in the accompanying featurettes on the disc, it's made for 12-13 year olds.

 

Other than that, I've been replaying the game Manhunt. I bought it as a PS2 Classic for my PS3 a few years ago when it was on sale, and didn't install it until the other day. It's still a blast and pretty difficult in some parts, but that's Rockstar Games for ya.

post #147927 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post
 

 

Russell turned in what is probably THE best villain of a Marvel movie this side of Redford in The Winter Soldier.

 

Yeah .... Kilgrave and Loki are the two best MCU villains by a wide margin.  Then there is Fisk.  Then a very wide gulf to whoever the next candidate is. 

 

I would say that Chewiebeetle Edgeofmyfork, if handled correctly, might be the next really compelling MCU villain.

 

I'm really concerned about Thanos ...

post #147928 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post

 

I'm really concerned about Thanos ...

 

The way they let Ronan talk over him in Guardians...

post #147929 of 152250

What did you all think of Brick Mansions?

post #147930 of 152250

Really, really unnecessary.

post #147931 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrichead View Post

Watched a low budget movie on Netflix called Timelapse.

 

Interesting. I had never heard of it before.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post

Farewell to a true legend...

 

He was the bomb.

 

Like others here, when I was a kid (and really young at that) I remember watching the 60's Batman on TV, so this death does make me pretty sad.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post

I hadn't mentioned this yet, but last night Vanessa and I saw Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol. 2.

 

I am glad you guys saw the movie and enjoyed it. I did not love the film but I can't complain that I saw the original and that one back to back on the big screen in 3D.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

24 Hours of Movies: Burt

 

Oh, this is another theoretical lists and not something that actually happened. But, I won't get mad because it's still discussion about Burt's films.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post

 I would say that Chewiebeetle Edgeofmyfork, if handled correctly, might be the next really compelling MCU villain.

 

Ha. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post

What did you all think of Brick Mansions?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfect Weapon View Post

Tonight, I saw Brick Mansions on Netflix Instant. It was the Theatrical Cut and not the longer Extended Cut but I don't know how much that would have mattered, as you'd still have too much shaky-cam/quick cutting, bad acting (RZA for sure, but he wasn't the only one), changes from the original film that did not improve things and how pointless the movie was. District B13 was a preposterous thing that was a product of its time, but it's much preferable to this.

post #147932 of 152250

Rest in peace, Mister West.  You will be missed.

 

GOTG2 is still the most fun I've had at a movie so far this year. 

 

24 Hours of Burt sounds cool, but I'd have substituted either STICK or HEAT for MALONE.  Or CITY HEAT.  I do have such love for that one.

 

RESIDENT EVIL: VENDETTA, hmm?  I haven't seen a Jovavich RE movie since EXTINCTION, though I did see the CGI film DEGENERATION and liked it.

 

HELL UP IN HARLEM and CLIFFHANGER are both great, no doubt.

 

It occurred to me today that I haven't really watched anything in a while.  I've been doing some podcast listening, some reading, some walking and biking but for the most part not a lot of movie watching.  Not interested in THE MUMMY, gonna wait till blu-ray to see WONDER WOMAN.  I should probably see IT COMES AT NIGHT.  Maybe tomorrow, I dunno.  Seeing a horror film during the day in the summer just makes it seem so much less scary.  Come to think of it, I am still watching the new season of TWIN PEAKS (repeatedly) and often comment on it over in that thread, for anyone intrigued by David Lynch's newest foray into television.  And I've been rereading Steven Pressfield's THE WAR OF ART, which is required inspirational reading for anyone trying to do anything creative.

 

I've been getting up earlier these days, trying to get up and about earlier so that I can leave work earlier and go some walking/biking afterwards when the weather's good.  Money was really tight this week so I wasn't doing any spending, but once I got paid on Friday I went off online and bought two, count 'em, two hardcover coffee table books about the legendary effects house INDUSTRIAL LIGHTS AND MAGIC , and the last five JOHN WILLIAMS film scores from the last fifteen years that I didn't have physical copies of: HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN, THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN, LINCOLN, THE BOOK THIEF and THE BFG.  See, I got on the music trading bandwagon like millions of others in the internet age and have done my share of sharing and such.  But recently, thinking about my heroes and seeing some pass away with regularity nowadays, I realized that I really should have legit physical copies of certain key artists' work.  This started a few years ago when I went back and grabbed a few Eric Clapton and David Bowie CDs, then certain soundtrack reissues from the film score companies La-La Land, SIlva Screen and Intrada.  Now the gaps in my collection of my lifetime artistic hero John Williams' catalogue have been ordered.  Feels good.  Feels right.

 

Got up early today and hit a 20-family neighborhood yard sale.  Didn't find anything there for me but picked up a trinket or two for my Mom.  Continued biking all over west Boston and over to Boston College, watched a couple of innings of what I think was a Chinese-American League (could've been Korean-American) baseball game in a local park, took an impromptu tour of a local landmark: a Waterworks Station and Museum - the first Metro Water System ever built in the United States of America, actually -  that was first built in the 1870s...

 

Then I continued being good to my health and grabbed a greek salad at a local deli instead of what I might've gotten in the old days: THE GODZILLA.  A ten-patty burger stack with five pounds of fries that costs $60.00 if you can't finish it but is free if you can.  Once upon a time, I could've polished that off.  Not any more.  Gotta keep on the health tip if I wanna stay around a long while.  (Pic below is of nobody I know, but was a snapshot on the wall of a previous successful Godzilla winner.)

 

 

 

 

Think I'll watch something before bed, actually.  Maybe the Tower Records documentary ALL THINGS MUST PASS.  Or something sleazy liike SPECIAL EFFECTS or DOUBLE EXPOSURE,  Gues I'll have to decide soon.  Night, all!


Edited by Engineer - 6/11/17 at 12:02am
post #147933 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post
 

 

Yeah .... Kilgrave and Loki are the two best MCU villains by a wide margin.  Then there is Fisk.  Then a very wide gulf to whoever the next candidate is. 

 

I would say that Chewiebeetle Edgeofmyfork, if handled correctly, might be the next really compelling MCU villain.

 

I'm really concerned about Thanos ...

 

 

I'll admit to blanking on Fisk and Loki. That's my mistake. They are the standouts, but I also really liked how Russell was having a blast as Ego, and Redford with his quiet menace as Pierce. Kilgrave though, I didn't really think was all that good a villain. When I watched the show I just never could take to him as the arch villain of the season. I'd take Diamondback from Luke Cage over him. Doesn't help that I didn't like the Jessica Jones show overall either.

 

 

 

Elvis, you mentioned the other day about Hide And Go Shriek. I haven't picked up that disc yet, but from I've read it's a great HD transfer. I need to get it as I haven't seen the movie since about 2006 or maybe 2007. It has quite the plot twist to it.

 

 

Didn't watch any movies this evening. I spent it watching more episodes of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers with Renata on dvd and then more playing of the Manhunt game. Nearly done with it too.

post #147934 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

But recently, thinking about my heroes and seeing some pass away with regularity nowadays, I realized that I really should have legit physical copies of certain key artists' work. 

 

Yeah, that is understandable. Maybe I should do that myself. As usual it sounds like you have had an interesting past few days, doing some things that I don't but maybe I should. I should probably visit local landmarks or walk around more so I can stumble onto random sporting events.

 

I mean, today I did Jack Shit; at least I did see something I had never watched before; via Amazon I rented Soylent Green. I do have to mention right away, yes... as a kid I found out the big M. Night-like twist the movie has, and it would have been ideal if I had not known beforehand. I presume most here know it, but in general it's not as big in pop culture as it used to be. Anyhow, what a bleak movie it has; what a shitty future the movie presented, with most people having to live in such poor conditions, the weather going to shit and resources depleted... then it's realizing the movie is not as far-fetched now as it was back then... and then there is this being Edward G. Robinson's last film role as he was deathly ill at the time but he hid it and he passed away only days after filming was completed; yeah, this was more of a downer than I expected.

 

That said, I was amused by how gruff Heston acted throughout, gleefully stealing rich people's shit so he could finally have some basic necessitites along the way. Also, how quickly he hooked up with Leigh Taylor-Young was quite amusing to me. The Scoops was definitely the funniest moment. The few times we got to see how the rich lived, it was what I dig, which was the kitschy 70's view of how "the future" would be. I'll say that the movie was good, but I do wish I could have gone into it cold.

post #147935 of 152250

This rules!

 

Jordan Hoffman: "In a few weeks it'll be exactly 1 year til the 10th anniversary of this, the greatest video ever uploaded to YouTube"

 

 

post #147936 of 152250

Took a shot at watching WAR ON EVERYONE. Had to tap out after 40 minutes. Wow were those characters insufferable.

 

Since I blew some time on that I was looking for something short to check out. Settled on Luke Goss and Bokeem Woodbine in AWOL-72 (82 minutes!).

 

 

Goss plays a marine with some sort of super secret Russian intel that puts him on the run from the Russian government as well as Woodbine as an assassin who wears a yellow-striped track suit. The Rza co-stars as an L.A. detective who mumbles a bunch of exposition from time to time.

 

It's pretty damn shoddy. Felt like a flick filmed on weekends when all the actors had time off from other projects. Goss has a decent swagger to him but his movies never have the budgets to provide any memorable action. Woodbine doesn't really push his character beyond a standard hitman antagonist.

 

Cannot recommend.

post #147937 of 152250

Goss and Statham need to make a Buddy movie together.

post #147938 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

This rules!

 

That was a video new to me; it was nicely put together.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post

Took a shot at watching WAR ON EVERYONE. Had to tap out after 40 minutes. Wow were those characters insufferable.

 

Since I blew some time on that I was looking for something short to check out. Settled on Luke Goss and Bokeem Woodbine in AWOL-72 (82 minutes!).

 

It's unfortunate you saw a bad movie and a really bad movie this weekend. It happens to all of us sometimes. War on Everyone is definitely a polarizing film, from what I hear.

 

Today, it hasn't been the best. I won't go into detail; it's one of those things where several little moments happened and wrapped up together, it's a day to forget. Hopefully I'll watch something worthwhile tonight.

post #147939 of 152250

Sorry today wasn't a better one for you, Perfect.  Mine started off with a sizable amount of ennui, actually.  It was one of those Sundays on which every single thing I thought of doing just seemed like a big waste of time...   Watch a movie?  Meh.  Read or listen to music or podcasts?  I'd just fall asleep.  Walking or biking?  Did it yesterday.  Cook?  Not hungry.  Stay online?  Too much Trump.  Complaining about everything?  EXCELLENT!

 

But! -- In the afternoon I forced myself onto an MBTA bus and rode over to Harvard Square.  It was a little too warm out there for my tastes (95 degrees and humid) but at least I got some sun and air and walking done.  Wasted time looking at records and blu-rays I knew I wouldn't be buying.  I did have a decent little burger and a root beer for lunch, took some photos and then hit a second record store that didn't have anything I wanted.  (Looked for the scores to JAWS, SUPERMAN and THE RIVER as well as albums by The Commodores, Vangelis and Tangerine Dream to no avail.)  

 

 

Coming home later, I made some chicken soup and tried to watch the documentary ALL THINGS MUST PASS about Tower Records.  The DVD-R wouldn't play in my DVD drive, though.  So instead I watched a stream of Jordan Peele's GET OUT (2017).  Liked it a lot, even though I found some of the comedy at odds with the social horror stuff.  Mostly, I thought it worked great.  On the ride back, I searched around on YouTube for the original score to Barry Levinson's RAIN MAN (1988).  I had seen the always-available soundtrack album on vinyl at one of the shops but declined getting it, mostly because there is a new issue of the full original score by Hans Zimmer out there now and very little of it made the commercially-released original soundtrack album on Capitol. I still remember when that film was released back in my cineplex job days and how it played out theater for what felt like forever, probably eight months.  And I'll always remember that at the time one of my favorite things about it was the score by the then-new guy, Hans Zimmer.  I'd never heard of him before as this score was his real break into the big leagues and at the time I told friends that it reminded me of Peter Gabriel, specifically his score to THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST: lots of drums and woodwinds and some electronic programming.  And then I started thinking about how hot it was that summer and how going to the theater was a real treat in 1988 as it seemed then that pretty much every film was good and worth a look somehow.  (My, how times have changed.)  

 

I got a little melancholy that something like RAIN MAN probably couldn't get made anymore by such an established filmmaker with such huge stars.  It would have to be a micro-mini digital thing now to minimize financial risk.  And with Cruise doing stuff like THE MUMMY these days, how refreshing it would be to get something like that film released these days.  Something human, with character, humor, real drama and in the end bittersweet and uplifting.  I'm glad there are still smaller studios making more human material like SULLY, COLOSSAL, MILES AHEAD, NED RIFLE, CERTAIN WOMEN, PATERSON and the like - some of which I still need to see.  I still like well-made studio fare like GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOLUME 2 and  10 CLOVERFIELD LANE, though.   As long as they're good.

post #147940 of 152250

New Poster for CHINA SALESMAN.

 

post #147941 of 152250

Hans Zimmer's early work - Rain ManBlack RainPacific HeightsThelma & LouiseTrue Romance - now feels underrated in the wake of his prestige status.

 

Hell, his work on stuff like Toys and Days of Thunder follow the Goldsmith/Horner rule and eclipse the films themselves.

post #147942 of 152250

Zimmer's early work was his best and most original, his music didn't sound like anyone else, now I can barely hear difference with say, Brian Tyler and the likes who are technically good but leave no personality behind heavy bombastic scores (except for Zimmer's beautiful 12 YEARS A SLAVE minimalistic music)...

 

I could say the same of Danny Elfman or other composers of that era who sure didn't want to stay typecast with one type of score, but they don't feel like personal work anymore (and for good reason since they often leave most of the work to their assistant composers, arrangers etc)

post #147943 of 152250

Broken Arrow is still my favorite Zimmer score next to Black Rain. It was certainly one of those "the score eclipsed the movie" type things for me when I saw it at the dollar theater back in the day. I mean, I really like Broken Arrow a lot, but the score still really stands out at least to me.

 

 

I had myself a pretty good day out. It was a surprise to me as well, since I didn't think we'd be going anywhere. Well, the decision was made to go get groceries and have a late lunch, so in the car the three of us went, and we had our late lunch at Luby's Cafeteria, which is a place Vanessa, Renata, and I hadn't been to since about 2014. It has delicious food, and they had a nice deal on an Angus Steak combo with bacon wrapped shrimp that I got. It was delicious. We went to the grocery store to get our groceries for the next several weeks, and back home it was for us. I spent the early evening finishing up playing the digital re-release of Manhunt that I'd been playing the last several days. It's really cool that they didn't update it for the PS3 and like with PS1 games, it begins with the exact original start up logo which is PLAYSTATION 2 in large font, and whenever I needed to save, it would be the exact same screen I would see on my PS3 which would as for an 8MB MEMORY CARD to be inserted. That made me laugh as I remember the frustrations back in the "memory card days" when I'd have to have make sure I had enough space on my memory cards, and I had several of them. I'm so glad that when the PS3 came around, they upgraded to internal hard drives.

 

Did my daily running exercises, and then watched more episodes of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers with Renata. A few hours ago after they went to sleep, I decided to start playing another digital release I bought some time ago, which was Resident Evil: The Darkside Chronicles. I hadn't read much on it other than it was a rail shooter (designed to be used with a "gun" type device, in this case the MOVE wand, and when it was released for the Wii it used the Wii remote and nunchuk), and reading more about it, it actually is a sequel to a previous rail shooter called The Umbrella Chronicles which I have as well, but haven't played yet. Anyway, aside from being a little wonky due to using the PS3 controller, as I don't have the MOVE wand, it has been both good and annoying. At least I can change the level of difficulty, because some of the bosses even on the normal setting are really hard. What I am liking is that the second section of the game is a retelling of Resident Evil 2 through a first person perspective. That's really cool.

post #147944 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

Sorry today wasn't a better one for you, Perfect.  Mine started off with a sizable amount of ennui, actually.  It was one of those Sundays on which every single thing I thought of doing just seemed like a big waste of time...   and how going to the theater was a real treat in 1988 as it seemed then that pretty much every film was good and worth a look somehow.  (My, how times have changed.)  

 

Yeah, I've mentioned many times before how many Hollywood movies these days don't hold much interest for me and considering how the U.S. box office has been the past few years (i.e. declining) there are plenty of people out there who prefer not going to the cineplex as often to see something that will likely be mediocre or worse.

 

But I also understand the feeling of ennui as I am sometimes like that. At least tonight turned out fine for me. I stayed in and watched quite the film, as I'll get to.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post

It's really cool that they didn't update it for the PS3 and like with PS1 games, it begins with the exact original start up logo which is PLAYSTATION 2 in large font, and whenever I needed to save, it would be the exact same screen I would see on my PS3 which would as for an 8MB MEMORY CARD to be inserted. That made me laugh 

 

Yeah, I have a PS3 also and I have games downloaded on it from the PS3 store which are PS2 games ported to the system and I am also amused they kept the old graphics, including the memory card thing; there's something about old gaming that I don't miss a damn bit.

 

Tonight, what I watched was another random movie I only discovered because it was on Amazon Prime. I understand it was released by Code Red a few years ago but the version Prime has is a VHS print. It wasn't the quality or it being fullscreen that tipped me off... it was the tracking problems that made it obvious! This Hong Kong movie is known in its native language as WOO FOOK, but the English title is Foxbat, which makes sense as that's the NATO name for the Soviet MiG 25 aircraft, which plans are the focus of the story. And wow, what a screwy movie it was. As Amazon described it:

 

"Veteran James Bond director Terence Young, helped direct this actioner that has several agents and bad guys going after a Hong Kong chef who swallowed a microfilm (thinking it was candy) that contains top secret blueprints for new stealth jet fighter the Foxbat, that Henry Silva took photos of with a camera hidden in his left eyeball!"

 

Note that it's a fake eyeball and not dissimilar from what Rhona Mitra had in Doomsday. The basic story isn't hard to understand once it gets going... Silva is a CIA agent who goes rogue and tries to sell thoes blueprints to the highest bidder but the chef mucks things up and now several different factions are after the chef. But, it's told in an incoherent manner and there are many strange elements. Let me list some highlights:

 

* There is a disco fashion show.

* Silva fights a sumo wrestler. That dude was normal sized and not gigantic like Akebono, but is still tougher than Red Grant.

* There is mind control. This is done by Roy Chiao as DOCTOR VOD, who is named that as he is "half Russian, half Mongolian", which is more than a little implausible.

* "CIA Headquarters, Langley, Virginia" is shown... except that it's depicted as 3 large office buildings in probably Los Angeles.

* Silva fights two random people, then refers to them as "a couple of fags".

* There are moments and even an entire scene that isn't dubbed; I don't know if that was intended or not.

* The cast also includes Vonetta McGee and Rik Van Nutter.

 

I presume what I saw was an edited version, and I'll also presume the full version is at least a little more coherent. As is, I can't say it's great as the story and plot progression is an absolute mess, and yet I can't say I was entertained and I was definitely not bored. There are interesting setpieces throughout, action or not. Plenty of old-school Hong Kong is seen, which was cool with me. Everything is just daffy, and it ended up being more interesting than what I was expecting, even with its hilarious plot description. At least there were some nice action scenes.

 

Oh, and the director who I presume did a lot of the work was Po-Chih Leong. Besides the usual Hong Kong movies, he also did the Wesley Snipes The Detonator but I know everyone will love that he actually directed one of Seagal's shitty DTV movies; it was Out of Reach, the one where he has the penpal that was kidnapped and he has to rescue her from human traffickers. I understand that plot is nonsensical too.

post #147945 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfect Weapon View Post
 

 

* There are moments and even an entire scene that isn't dubbed; I don't know if that was intended or not.

 

There are some scenes like this in my dubbed copy of Master of the Flying Guillotine.

 

I presume it is due to them putting scenes back in that were not in the film when it was edited and dubbed for release here is the US.

post #147946 of 152250

Great write up on ROBOCOP:

 

"Turning an ultra-violent satire on consumer culture into one of the most highly merchandised films of the decade."

 

http://thenewbev.com/blog/2017/06/robocop-2/

 

"Paul Verhoeven had a difficult time releasing this movie. The MPAA was adamant on the X-rating due to the graphic content, extreme violence and dark themes. He submitted several cuts, all to no avail. It still got an X. Finally after 11 or 12 (the number depends on who you ask) submissions; the film received its much-desired R-rating and was released. But that didn’t mean that all was well. For a film that pointedly satirized consumer culture and openly critiqued the evils of commercialism, corporate greed and corruption of the highest level, it was REALLY WEIRD that it was chock full of commercial advertisements. They are, of course, the best ads you’ll ever watch, but they are ads nonetheless. Many critics and audience members didn’t seem to “get it.”  This was a film, not TV. Why would you break the narrative like that? Too damn experimental. While these commercials are certainly entertaining and funny and they may seem to lighten the mood after seeing people’s guts getting spilled all over the screen, they are, perhaps one of the most horrifying portions of RoboCop. The MPAA cared about people getting killed, shot to bits, etc. But they didn’t give a hoot about the genius of the slew of advertisements that hit the screen. But….UM, HOLY SHIT. These commercials hit dead center. They go straight to the guts of America: Parker Bros and family games, car “safety” and physical well-being. These threaten everything Americans hold dear. 15-30 seconds and these ads rip us apart. In talking about these ads and the public’s response, Verhoeven said, “The critic of the Los Angeles Times, I think, was watching [the movie] and some commercial comes on, and that critic walked out to the projectionist and told him, ‘You’ve put on the wrong reels.’…I mean, that really happened. The whole style of these intermezzos of news in the middle of an action movie I think was almost unheard of at the time. Although actually he should have known, because Citizen Kane does some of the same stuff.”"

post #147947 of 152250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

Sorry today wasn't a better one for you, Perfect.  Mine started off with a sizable amount of ennui, actually.  It was one of those Sundays on which every single thing I thought of doing just seemed like a big waste of time...   Watch a movie?  Meh.  Read or listen to music or podcasts?  I'd just fall asleep.  Walking or biking?  Did it yesterday.  Cook?  Not hungry.  Stay online?  Too much Trump.  Complaining about everything?  EXCELLENT!


But! -- In the afternoon I forced myself onto an MBTA bus and rode over to Harvard Square.  It was a little too warm out there for my tastes (95 degrees and humid) but at least I got some sun and air and walking done.  Wasted time looking at records and blu-rays I knew I wouldn't be buying.  I did have a decent little burger and a root beer for lunch, took some photos and then hit a second record store that didn't have anything I wanted.  (Looked for the scores to JAWS, SUPERMAN and THE RIVER as well as albums by The Commodores, Vangelis and Tangerine Dream to no avail.)  




Coming home later, I made some chicken soup and tried to watch the documentary ALL THINGS MUST PASS about Tower Records.  The DVD-R wouldn't play in my DVD drive, though.  So instead I watched a stream of Jordan Peele's GET OUT (2017).  Liked it a lot, even though I found some of the comedy at odds with the social horror stuff.  Mostly, I thought it worked great.  On the ride back, I searched around on YouTube for the original score to Barry Levinson's RAIN MAN (1988).  I had seen the always-available soundtrack album on vinyl at one of the shops but declined getting it, mostly because there is a new issue of the full original score by Hans Zimmer out there now and very little of it made the commercially-released original soundtrack album on Capitol. I still remember when that film was released back in my cineplex job days and how it played out theater for what felt like forever, probably eight months.  And I'll always remember that at the time one of my favorite things about it was the score by the then-new guy, Hans Zimmer.  I'd never heard of him before as this score was his real break into the big leagues and at the time I told friends that it reminded me of Peter Gabriel, specifically his score to THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST: lots of drums and woodwinds and some electronic programming.  And then I started thinking about how hot it was that summer and how going to the theater was a real treat in 1988 as it seemed then that pretty much every film was good and worth a look somehow.  (My, how times have changed.)  

I got a little melancholy that something like RAIN MAN probably couldn't get made anymore by such an established filmmaker with such huge stars.  It would have to be a micro-mini digital thing now to minimize financial risk.  And with Cruise doing stuff like THE MUMMY these days, how refreshing it would be to get something like that film released these days.  Something human, with character, humor, real drama and in the end bittersweet and uplifting.  I'm glad there are still smaller studios making more human material like SULLY, COLOSSAL, MILES AHEAD, NED RIFLE, CERTAIN WOMEN, PATERSON and the like - some of which I still need to see.  I still like well-made studio fare like GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOLUME 2 and  10 CLOVERFIELD LANE, though.   As long as they're good.

Just watched Rain Man last night with my brother since he remembered nothing about it, it is one of my favorites, and I leave for Navy recruit training today. It is a great story and a fantastic character turn of Tom Cruise's Charlie as he learns more about his brother and his role in his life. Plus it ends on a realistic, yet uplifting note.

I'll let this be my last post for the next 8 weeks. You guys on the board (and especially this thread) have been great and extremely welcoming.

Hope to continue the good times in August on Poop City! See ya soon.
Edited by Call Me Roy - 6/12/17 at 5:27am
post #147948 of 152250

The Mike: "If you need a Grindhousier way to pay tribute to Adam West, I recommend 1975's THE SPECIALIST. A fun public domain flick."

 

(NSFW trailer)

 

post #147949 of 152250
post #147950 of 152250
I've been told I resemble a young Sizemore. William Petersen comes up too.
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