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post #153001 of 153737

Oh, I am so in for this.

 

That "Cage Rage" moment they describe sounds wonderful.

post #153002 of 153737

Gonna be tough to top the pool table scene in MOM AND DAD but it sounds like MANDY has a few moments that'll give it a fair fight.

post #153003 of 153737
You give Mom and Dad an endorsement, Molt?
post #153004 of 153737
Wholeheartedly!

It's out there, but it was my kind of out there.
post #153005 of 153737

Drew McWeeny: "I was lucky enough to become friends with filmmaker George Cosmatos during the last decade of his life. A wonderful guy, generous and kind. I wish he could have seen his son's movie tonight. He would have exploded from joy and pride."

 

"I can testify: that poster is telling you exactly what you'll get when you see the film."

 

 

post #153006 of 153737

A big Keanu Reeves "WHOA!" from me (and the rest of us i think).

post #153007 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post
 

Don't you worry about that. Kick your feet up and enjoy the show! I dug it.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
 

Same here. I think you'll like it.

Thanks guys. I did enjoy it. It had more of a melodramatic John Woo vibe than I expected. Not as much action as I hoped for, but what was there was well done.

 

It could have used some more of the tricks like he pulled on the guys in the bathroom.

post #153008 of 153737

Saw my Netflix dvd rental of the week earlier. Harry Dean Stanton's final film, Lucky. Very few actors get to have a standout performance and film as their final curtain call, and Harry Dean Stanton got that with Lucky. He plays a 90 year old man named Lucky who after a falling spell begins to think about his own mortality. Lots of stuff about Harry Dean Stanton himself is featured. Such as his harmonica playing, he sings a song in Spanish with a Mariachi band, his character is from Kentucky like he actually was, and his chainsmoking is hilariously alluded to many times. Ed Begley Jr. in his cameo as Lucky's doctor even says "Your lungs are in great shape. Despite your smoking. You either have a genetic anomaly, or are one tough son of a bitch." Before that, when he goes to the diner for breakfast and attempts to light up, Barry Shabaka-Henley tells him not to and that they will kill him to which Lucky replies "If they could've, they would've."

 

David Lynch has several scenes as a friend of Lucky's who laments over the loss of his tortoise PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT who left while he had the gate open to his home, and Lynch himself has a heartfelt and dramatic speech later on that shows that he's not just an incredible director, but that he's just as good an actor. Ron Livingston shows up as a lawyer, and Tom Skerritt rounds out the cameos as a fellow war veteran who Lucky meets at the diner and has a great speech about seeing a young girl smiling amid all the destruction. I didn't even realize that Skerritt is 84 years old! I thought he was at most in his late 70's. Not nearly the same age as Harry Dean Stanton.

 

In short, it's an excellent film that any fan of Harry Dean Stanton would enjoy. Highly recommended.

post #153009 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterTarantino View Post

But I've always wanted him as the modern Tackleberry in a Police Academy legacy sequel/reboot.

 

It's been rumored for YEARS now and I wish something could have happened while the entire cast was still alive, but that casting would make sense.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post

Watched MOM AND DAD. Fairly demented stuff. 

 

Unfortunately it's not playing anywhere near me; the closest location I know is more than 2 hours away. I have heard several scenes be alluded to in a "Holy Shit" manner.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

"I can testify: that poster is telling you exactly what you'll get when you see the film." 

 

That poster... it's so beautiful it almost brings a tear to my eye.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post

In short, it's an excellent film that any fan of Harry Dean Stanton would enjoy. Highly recommended.

 

I am glad to hear that; I am sure that one day I'll check it out.

 

Today was another not so exciting day, but at least the day went fine.

post #153010 of 153737

Yeah, I went out as well. We took Renata to eat at the pizza and pasta buffet/kids game room place Mr. Gatti's. It was nice to have pizza and pasta and Renata loved playing the various games after we were done. We then headed over to one of the places I'm closely associated with, Big Lots since they had a 20% off your entire purchase deal going on. They had several blus of interest to me, but I only picked up one, a noir starring Jack Palance as a hitman that contracts a deadly virus and goes on the run through New Orleans with a doctor played by RIchard Widmark hot on his trail. It was only 3 bucks, and that plot alone sealed the deal for me. Turned out to be less than 3 bucks too with the 20% off that and the other stuff we got.

post #153011 of 153737

I remember that you and the family are fans of Mr. Gatti's. Maybe I should go to Big Lots myself soon. That noir you mentioned is 1950's Panic in the Streets; I've only heard of it because of its cast and the director being Elia Kazan.

 

While it's only available for those that are Amazon Prime members, recently they uploaded something that made many horror fans happy: an HD widescreen print of Fright Night Part 2. Due to those nebulous rights issues, any version of the movie was hard to find as the shitty DVD version went out of print pretty much as soon as it went on sale almost 15 years ago. Before I get to that in the near future, I watched the original Fright Night. That's a very good movie, although part of it is due to everything about EVIL ED, from his appearance and what he says to his dress and the performance of Stephen Geoffreys; I find it all to be incredible. The film as a whole is quite enjoyable; that includes the story, characters, and how 80's-riffic it is. What a score and soundtrack, too.

post #153012 of 153737

Excellent piece with Nic Cage (including videos) on the changing face of film exhibition and VOD, comic book movies, DVD screeners, #MeToo, MANDY (not enough on MANDY though) and more...

 

http://variety.com/2018/film/news/nicolas-cage-on-high-movie-prices-not-playing-superman-and-sundance-action-movie-mandy-1202671053/

post #153013 of 153737

Yesterday as a good one.  Woke up and went out for breakfast for a filling plate of eggs, sausage, home fries and a coffee and walked it off a while before heading into the city to MoviePass myself a ticket for the Jackie Chan-produced remake of A BETTER TOMORROW (2018).  I still had an hour before the movie started, so I walked around the city streets looking for something I'd heard about some time ago: "The Writer's Room," a members-only clean, quiet office for which one is granted a key and is allowed inside 24-hours a day for writing, where's there's intenet, coffee and lots of light from outside.  I heard about it through a friend and while I knew it was probably outside of my price range (this kid's parents pay his way through things, one of those families) I went looking for it anyway.  Found the building but not having a key yet, naturally I couldn't get in.  I'll have to investigate further, as it seems like something I'd dig on.  Trying to write at home isn't working too well and while I love the coffee shop nearby it gets too loud, sometimes.

 

Went back to watch A BETTER TOMORROW 2018 on the big-screen  Directed by Ding Sheng (LITTLE BIG SOLDIER, POLICE STORY 2013), it was pretty good.  Not an action blowout really but what's there works for the most part.  It's been a long time since I watched the John Woo 1986 original (it's now on my desk for revisiting) but I found this new version to be more heartfelt and engaging than the 2010 South Korean remake, anyway.  Wang Kai was very good as the older brother even though he had the cool of a Chow Yun Fat, here and there.  As this film's version of Yun Fat's "Mark" character the younger hothead brother, Darren Wang gets a smile here and there, though his portrayal is far too cartoonishly aggressive and not smooth in the least.   There are tons of illusions to the original film and one or two little cameos for fans of classic HK crime cinema.  Slight but recommended.  Then hung out in Chinatown for a while, visiting a shop where I've become a regular over time and picking up a DVD of THE ADVENTURERS (2017) with Andy Lau, Shi Qi and Jean Reno.  But who knows it'll take me to get around to watching it. 

 

Got home and picked up some Chinese food, inspired by my afternoon.  Veggie fried rice and some Peking Ravioli.  Then sat down and watched Hayao Miyazaki's LAPUTA: CASTLE IN THE SKY (1986, DVD), which I didn't love but was suitable entertained by.  While the environments and most of the characters were fine, I felt it was overlong.  Still have several more Miyazaki films to go, actually, so we'll see how it stacks up in the long run.

 

Today: laundry, movies, reading hopefully.  

post #153014 of 153737

Watched DEN OF THIEVES. It's one that could be nit-picked to death but in the end it's a blast of a performance from Gerard Butler. He's every movie cop-cliche dialed up to 11 and he's a hoot to watch here.

 

It really isn't as action-centric as you'd think from the ads. There was a big sequence at the start and then toward the end but in between is a lot of Butler devouring the screen while the robber crew plans their big heist. I liked that there are scenes in this film that go on for a long time. Mainly Butler's interrogation of O'Shea Jackson and the early stages of the heist.

 

The end is a bit on the gimmicky side but it wasn't a deal breaker.

post #153015 of 153737
I love my local library.


Edited by Engineer - 1/21/18 at 1:49pm
post #153016 of 153737
KILL ZONE 2 is legit.

I was really disappointed by THREE. Don't know what was up with that one.
post #153017 of 153737

Belated Birthday Shout Out:

 

 
post #153018 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

 

Went back to watch A BETTER TOMORROW 2018 on the big-screen  Directed by Ding Sheng (LITTLE BIG SOLDIER, POLICE STORY 2013), it was pretty good.  Not an action blowout really but what's there works for the most part.  It's been a long time since I watched the John Woo 1986 original (it's now on my desk for revisiting) but I found this new version to be more heartfelt and engaging than the 2010 South Korean remake, anyway.  Wang Kai was very good as the older brother even though he had the cool of a Chow Yun Fat, here and there.  As this film's version of Yun Fat's "Mark" character the younger hothead brother, Darren Wang gets a smile here and there, though his portrayal is far too cartoonishly aggressive and not smooth in the least.   There are tons of illusions to the original film and one or two little cameos for fans of classic HK crime cinema.  Slight but recommended.  Then hung out in Chinatown for a while, visiting a shop where I've become a regular over time and picking up a DVD of THE ADVENTURERS (2017) with Andy Lau, Shi Qi and Jean Reno.  But who knows it'll take me to get around to watching it. 

 

Just curious, but did they use the classic music theme?

post #153019 of 153737
Originally Posted by felix View Post

Just curious, but did they use the classic music theme?

 

It wasn't used as score but there was a cute sort of reference to it. 

post #153020 of 153737

Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Favorite Film Discoveries '17

 

http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2018/01/film-discoveries-of-2017-justin.html

 

 

 

"Justin LaLiberty holds degrees in Critical Film Studies and Film Preservation in Archiving. He is currently responsible for programming at Alamo Drafthouse in Yonkers, NY and is an itinerant projectionist, ready to run reels if you've got 'em. He is a regular contributor to Paracinema and can usually be found in whichever NYC art-house is showing the most sordid content on a given day.

2017 was a crazy year for me. It was my first full calendar year as a programmer and I watched way too many films. Over 800, actually. This is my longest discoveries list yet which is indicative of how many great films are out there just waiting for the right audience to come along and I absolutely intend to screen as many of these as possible to paying audiences in the following year. Here’s to more discoveries in 2018!"

 

NO CONTEST (1995, Paul Lynch)
 

"If I had to choose one discovery of 2017 as the most fun it would be no contest because it would be NO CONTEST. Paul “PROM NIGHT” Lynch delivers one of the most batshit DTV releases of the mid-90s with this DIE HARD clone featuring a mustachioed Andrew Dice Clay holding a fucking beauty pageant hostage. And who is our John McClane: none other than Shannon Tweed. Robert Davi is her guy on the outside, Roddy Piper plays a villain named Ice who gets killed with a bag of ice. There’s a requisite StairMaster reference and some nicely timed Ben & Jerry’s jokes (!). Not sure where this has been all of my life, but I’m very happy to have it now.

Also look for its also DTV sequel FACE THE EVIL, also featuring Tweed this time taking on Lance Henriksen in a museum held hostage over Nazi shit. It’s quite the double feature. "

 

 

CISCO PIKE (1972, Bill L. Norton)
 

"I caught this as part of a Harry Dean Stanton retro shortly after his death and it’s one of the better screenings I attended this year. I near criminally underrated early 70s slice of life from the director of BABY: SECRET OF THE LOST LEGEND, Harry Dean is joined here by Kris Kristofferson, Gene Hackman (who has a great moment where he runs in place for an extended period of time, and Karen Black. This is the kind of disaffected 70s alienation cinema that I long for and it deserves a much bigger audience than it has seen. "

 

 

COLD STEEL (1987, Dorothy Ann Puzo)
 

"Back in the late 80s, Mario Puzo’s daughter directed one film and that film is COLD STEEL. A Christmastime crime thriller where Jonathan Banks plays Iceman, a junkie killer with a robot voicebox who force feeds people fish to death. Brad Davis and Sharon Stone team up, he mansplains how to eat sushi to her, there's a gratuitous sex scene and an equally gratuitous (but solid) shoot out. Bonus points for the practical stunt heavy car chase that ends in a racetrack."

 

IRRESISTIBLE FORCE (1993, Kevin Hooks)
 

"In the annals of “how did this happen” made for TV movies, we get this DIE HARD set in a mall featuring Cynthia Rothrock as a Navy SEAL trained rookie police officer who happens to get herself inside of a mall during a takeover by white supremacists. She then proceeds to take them out with her trademark kicks, some uzi shooting and, at one point, dual wilding frying pans. Oh, and Stacy Keach plays her partner and Paul Winfield is a sexist police chief who refers to Rothrock as Wonder Woman. Anyone saying that we’re currently living in the Golden Age of TV is flat out fucking wrong. "

 

TOP OF THE HEAP (1972, Christopher St. John)
 

"As soon as this ended, I wanted to find a rooftop and shout its praises. There is no reason for this to be as unknown as it is, but hopefully that will change thanks to the Code Red blu-ray currently available. A socio-political evisceration of its time, masqueraded as escapist blaxploitation fare - basically a sort of fired up, stylish proto-Bad Lieutenant with some brutal violence and surreal sci-fi moments that make this a rarely singular entry in early 70s genre cinema. There's really nothing else like it. "

 

WOLF LAKE (1980, Burt Kennedy)
 

"Workmanlike, dark Canadian genre cinema from the dude who gave us SUBURBAN COMMANDO is an ultra-bleak us vs them narrative featuring Rod Steiger and his band of baddies terrorizing a young couple in the woods as a result of the guy being a Vietnam deserter. Its politics are still relevant and its cynicism is apt. Borderline repellent in its nastiness at times, but Steiger is a force and it plays out like STRAW DOGS meets DEATH HUNT. "

post #153021 of 153737

Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Favorite Film Discoveries '17

 

http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2018/01/film-discoveries-of-2017-john-cribbs.html

 

 

 

"John Cribbs is the co-founder and head writer of The Pink Smoke (http://thepinksmoke.com/), where for the last 10 years he's offered a spirited defense of Robert Altman's QUINTET, passionately extolled what he feels to be the most underrated killer rat movie and delved into the seedy underworld of movie novelizations. Feel free to hit him up on Twitter at @thepinksmoke or @thelastmachine and hey, if you feel like watching SNEAKERS he's always up for it.

2017 might not have been a fun year overall, but it was definitely a good year (for me, at least) as far as watching old movies. I can't express enough the therapeutic value of selecting a movie theme for a month and binging on titles that fit that theme: a month of Giallo, a month of Harryhausen, a month of Walter Hill (WILD BILL was a major re-discovery last year). It brings balance and structure to an otherwise ungoverned film-viewing itinerary when you can spend all day thinking, "I can't wait to get to tonight's post-war wrestling movie!" Here are a few highlights from my newly organized movie rotation:"

 

 

CHINESE STUNTMAN (1982, Bruce Li)
 

"Some films are excellent standalone efforts, others standouts from a series of films. And then there's the odd title that can only be fully appreciated after immersing oneself into a very specific kind of movie, like the very weird world of Bruceploitation. Which is what I did at the beginning of the year, to prepare for a presentation at Kevin Geeks Out at the Nitehawk Cinema in Brooklyn. (For more about that, visit Kevin Maher's "2017 Discovery" list.) For roughly a decade following the Little Dragon's death, dozens of films were churned out as if Bruce Lee were simply a brand from which countless imitations could be mass produced. While I can't help being fascinated by this phenomenon, from the truly Bruceploitive (BRUCE LEE FIGHTS BACK FROM THE GRAVE) to the flat-out bonkers (THE DRAGON LIVES AGAIN), there's undeniably a seediness to the entire venture, even the classiest entries like GAME OF DEATH.

The most prolific of Bruce clones was James Ho Chung Tao. Rechristened "Bruce Li" by the Hong Kong film industry, he was called upon to do everything: he played Bruce, he avenged Bruce's death, he battled gorillas in the jungle. Between 1974 and 1982, he made 30 films with titles like THE DRAGON DIES HARD, EXIT THE DRAGON ENTER THE TIGER, FISTS OF FURY II and WANTED! BRUCE LI, DEAD OR ALIVE. Many were fun (see: SOUL BROTHERS OF KUNG FU), but all were shameless knock-offs - Tao not only languished in the icon's shadow, he built a house there.

Which is what makes CHINESE STUNTMAN such a profound piece of kung fu cinema. Tao directs and stars as stuntman to a famous international action star who discovers the studio plans to murder him for the insurance money. Each attack on Tao's martial artist (there are several excellent fight scenes) wears him down further until he finds himself in a final knockdown brawl on every floor of a teahouse, which ends with the combatants pushing each other out of the top window. Tao walks away from the fight, alive but deeply scathed. One of the movie producers shouts at him to come back, but he doesn't even turn around. Tao would never make another film."

 

 

 

THE ADVENTURES OF QUENTIN DURWARD (1955, Richard Thorpe)
 

"Speaking of deliriously stunning climactic set pieces, anyone who doubts that the wuxia film was highly influenced by swashbucklers need only witness QUENTIN DURWARD's final epic battle in which the dueling hero and villain cross swords while SWINGING FROM BELL ROPES OVER A RAGING FIRE! The thrillingly crafted scene, illustrated on the film's excellent poster, showcases stunts and effects that feel modern over 60 years later (I immediately thought of the poles-over-fire three-way fight of IRON MONKEY). It makes you wonder why Hollywood action films of the 50's weren't routinely mixing three awesome things together in the same scene.

There's plenty to love leading up to the film's towering finale: lots of court machinations, fights on moving carriages, Robert Morley as a wonderfully conniving Louis XI (it's also one of the few star turns for the lovely Kay Kendall, who died tragically young). Director Richard Thorpe and star Robert Taylor had previously teamed up for a 1952 adaptation of Sir Walter Scott's more famous work IVANHOE, but despite featuring Robin Hood's crew as supporting characters that film's not easily categorized as a swashbuckler. DURWARD, on the other hand, has everything a fan of the subgenre could ask for: its undercover plot even ties it to excellent swashbucklers THE BLACK PIRATE and AGAINST ALL FLAGS, in which Fairbanks and Flynn respectively join a pirate gang to take it down from the inside. Like BARDELYS, it was distributed by MGM (they thankfully didn't destroy all existing prints of this one) and remains woefully underseen, although it's been made available through the fantastic Warner Brothers Archive Collection. It was a big deal at the time (it was even turned into a Dell Four Color comic) and deserves to be a big deal now: why actors like Russell Crowe and Taron Egerton aren't vying to play a new version of Quentin Durward is totally beyond me."

 

 

THE MONSTER AND THE GIRL (1941, Stuart Heisler)
 

"I've slowly been collecting all the Universal Classic Monsters Collection videos from the early 90's over the last couple years. While I've had no trouble tracking down most of the core monsters at flea markets and used book stores (still have my eye out for a few Mummy and Invisible Man sequels), it's a rare treat to stumble upon one of the second or third tier titles of the series like HOUSE OF HORRORS or MAN MADE MONSTER. THE MONSTER AND THE GIRL is a particular oddity: for one thing, it was originally distributed by Paramount Pictures, not Universal. And the "monster" of the title is no more than a massive gorilla that happens to have the salvaged brain of a man who was framed by gangsters and executed by the state transplanted in its head, care of mad scientist George Zucco (who clearly learned nothing from his human-to-ape experimenting, since he'd be up to it again in DR. RENAULT'S SECRET the following year).

Once you move past some stiff courtroom drama this becomes a revenge film like no other, with a kill list of crooks subjected to furry vengeance. It's a fun size King Kong, the spiteful simian getting even while also protecting his sister (Ellen Drew, the suspected vorvolaka from ISLE OF THE DEAD). The high-running emotions make this a perfect double feature with fellow Classic Monster Collection inductee CAPTIVE WILD WOMAN (which features a reversal of MONSTER's plot, a female ape gets turned into a human lady). The highlight of the film is the ape suit itself, beautifully sculpted and acted by "King of the Gorilla Men" Charlie Gemora. Also worth nothing: he's got a dog sidekick."

post #153022 of 153737

Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Favorite Film Discoveries '17

 

http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2018/01/film-discoveries-of-2017-david-j-moore.html

 

 

"david j. moore is the author of the books World Gone Wild: A Survivor's Guide to Post-Apocalyptic Movies and The Good, the Tough, and the Deadly: Action Movies and Stars from Schiffer Publishing."

 

 

Enemy Empire (a.k.a. Furious Road) - 2013 (Three Wolves Ltd. DVD R2)
 

"A man with a bionic arm roams the wastelands in search of a woman. He must get to an oracle that will tell him where to find the Nomad King, who might have his woman. The man is Sol (Tristan James Butler), and when he gets caught in a trap he can't escape, an Amazon warrior named Cleo (Elisabeth Meurer) saves him, and for the heck of it, they team up to help each other out. Cleo tells Sol that he has "sun disease," which occurs in wastelanders that don't protect their eyes, and the disease is a sort of madness that makes you see all sorts of familiar faces (including your own) in the place of the actual face you're seeing, and this takes Sol by surprise. It's true, of course: Sol is clearly affected by sun disease, and we as the audience get confused and disoriented when he sees people who have interchangeable faces. Sol and Cleo encounter more wastelanders, including a Witch Warrior, the oracle, and the Nomad King himself, but who those people actually are in relation to the characters we've already been introduced to might surprise you.

A quirky, out-of-nowhere post-apocalyptic indie film, Enemy Empire will most likely be unfairly written off as amateur garbage, but I found it engaging and surprising for something that looks like it was made by some buddies over a few weekends. It looks really good for a no-budget movie. They shot on widescreen digital, and the locations they used are sometimes stunningly beautiful. The sound quality is good, the music isn't terrible, and while the acting and dialogue are the weakest aspects to the film, I'd still recommend it. It reminded me of much better indie apocalyptic films like Six String Samurai, Bleak Future, and Black Pearl, but this one is simpler. Watching it gave me hope that there's still room for earnest filmmakers to go out and chase their dreams, even if it's on a very small scale. Written and directed by Michael Ryan Hahn."

 

 

How to Save Us - 2015 (Parade Deck Films DVD)
 

"A man named Brian (Jason Trost, who also wrote and directed) travels to an apocalyptic quarantined area in Australia to find his brother, who is searching for a gateway to another dimension. Brian smuggles himself into desolated Tasmania, and follows clues that his brother left for him to follow, as they each go on their own bizarre sojourn into territory that is now occupied by ghosts intent on dragging them into the realm of the dead. As Brian gets closer and closer to catching up to his brother, he begins to have an existential crisis that pits him against his haunted memories.

Vastly unique, but teetering on the cusp of irrelevance to the apocalyptic genre, How to Save Us earns big points for trying something different on a miniscule budget, but I wish it were set during a global apocalypse rather than a small corner of the world. It would give the movie a stronger anchor, but as it is, it should give aspiring filmmakers some much needed inspiration on how to make an apocalyptic movie with big themes and a big canvas, but with very little money. It's not as flashy or garish as Trost's previous film The FP (which I hated), so it's nice to see him maturing here. If you like the Pulse movies, check this one out. They're similar. "

 

 

Scream For Help - 1984 (Warner VHS)
 

"A teenage girl named Christie (Rachael Kelly) believes right from the start that her new stepdad intends to murder her mother for her money. She makes no bones about it, telling anyone who will listen, but there's a big problem: No one believes her. We know that her stepdad (played by David Allen Brooks) is a slime ball: We see him setting traps that are intended on harming his wife (played by Marie Masters), and we know he's having an affair with a floozy (played by Lolita Lorre), whose husband has a plan to help him murder Christie's mom so that they can split the inheritance three ways ... which means that Christie will have to be killed as well. Christie, meanwhile, basically plays an amateur sleuth to figure all this out before any of it goes down, and her journey becomes increasingly perilous and fraught with sights and sounds no teenager should ever be witness to. She involves her friend Janey (Sandra Clark), who is murdered, and then Janey's boyfriend Josh (Corey Parker), and every time she tries to seek help, her situation gets worse and more complicated. Growing up should never be this dangerous ... or as sleazy.

From director Michael Winner, who made this in between his films Death Wish II and Death Wish 3, Scream For Help is a shockingly lurid and sleazy potboiler with graphic nudity, hard profanity, strong sexual content, and some death scenes that are zingers, but it's all wrapped up in a delightfully innocent-seeming Nancy Drew perspective that will have you baffled and rolling in the aisles with hysterics. It's most certainly a coming of age movie, but it reminded me of The Last American Virgin filtered through a Michael Winner exploitation film. There's nothing else quite like it, although a few years later the film The Stepfather repeated the formula, but without the hard sleaze factor. See it at all costs. "

post #153023 of 153737

What a cool series!

 

https://www.bam.org/film/2018/fight-the-power-black-superheroes-on-film?alttemplate=MobileProgram

 

 

Fight the Power: Black Superheroes on Film

 

From blaxploitation icons to supernatural avengers to anti-colonial outlaws, this series spotlights an alternative cinematic history of black screen heroes and anti-establishment defiance.

post #153024 of 153737
Quote:

Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

 I still had an hour before the movie started, so I walked around the city streets looking for something I'd heard about some time ago: "The Writer's Room," a members-only clean, quiet office for which one is granted a key and is allowed inside 24-hours a day for writing, where's there's intenet, coffee and lots of light from outside.

 

I hadn't heard of that gimmick before but it sounds like a great idea.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post
I love my local library.

 

Living in a large city is nice for reasons like that. My local library has a selection of older titles I can't complain about, but they have no modern foreign discs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

NO CONTEST (1995, Paul Lynch)

 

I've heard of that before but the description makes it sound amazing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

THE ADVENTURES OF QUENTIN DURWARD (1955, Richard Thorpe)

 

That movie is new to me but the climax sounds bonkers; thankfully it can be rented from several different streaming sites, although not Amazon.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Scream For Help - 1984 (Warner VHS)

 

As I am me, I remember reading here a long time ago about a really sleazy Michael Winner movie which had such a odd viewpoint; not its title nor it being written by Tom Holland, but rather the director and its plot. That is another movie which is not on Amazon but is on some other streaming video sites for rental.

post #153025 of 153737
post #153026 of 153737

Went out around 1 to Target to check out the $10 movie sale they had going on. Picked up Dunkirk, Kingsmen 2, and Lego Ninjago Movie all on blu-ray. Picked up a soup to go from a barbecue place, and came back home to eat and finishing watching the film I started last night. Richard Donner's second to last film, Timeline. I remember when it came out, but I dismissed it as uninteresting. I probably never would have seen it had I not found the dvd for 75 cents at Big Lots a month ago. It's not a bad film, but it certainly isn't memorable either. It was also weird hearing Gerard Butler talk with his natural Scottish accent after being so used to him using his default American accent in various films. It reminded me of when I first saw Bob Hoskins speaking with is natural accent when I was a kid, and only knew him as Eddie Valiant. Still, it was cool seeing Butler in his beginnings as an action hero, and Paul Walker helping out. Too bad that Neal McDonough didn't have much to do.

 

Late last night I saw another dvd I picked up fairly cheaply at Dollar General called Exeter. It's a possession horror film that is based in a defunct asylum being cleaned up by a bunch of asstagonists and STEPHEN LANG plays a priest. Directed by Marcus Nispel, this film wasn't very good, but it at least tried to be a tad bit different by adding a sprinkle of humor and trying to be like The Evil Dead. As the film goes on, it is revealed that everything happening is due to one person (naturally it's one of the kids that's in the group in the asylum) and that's where things became incredibly confusing for me. This character appears to be human, yet with "powers of persuasion" that border on the supernatural, YET this same character appears to be "possessed" during the climax, YET completely in control. This same character also claims to have orchestrated everything to have one of the kids murder one of the other characters in the film. Like I said, confusing. This same character also mentions awakening the tormented souls of the people who perished in the asylum and ah, screw it. I'm not going to bother trying to figure this shit out.

 

Right now I'm finishing up watching the first disc of Sliders: Season 1. I loved this show back in the mid 90's when it debuted, and I never did get to see the 4th or 5th seasons once it got picked up by the Sci-Fi Channel. I also haven't seen the second or third seasons since they first aired. So it was nice to be able to pick up the Universal Complete Series dvd set for a nice low price on Amazon.

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Anyone hear anything about this new Netflix series called Altered Carbon?

 

The trailer looks pretty good.

 

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Never read the book its based on, but looking forward to checking out the show. Guess it's all about being able to transfer your consciousness into a new body.

 

Hmmmm...

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moltisanti View Post
 

Never read the book its based on, but looking forward to checking out the show. Guess it's all about being able to transfer your consciousness into a new body.

 

Hmmmm...

 

 

That was my first thought!

 

But Kinnaman is no Estevez.

post #153031 of 153737

Plus I wager no Scorpions on the show's soundtrack.

 

"I'm ready for that hit between the eyes, Someone get me out of here aliiiiiiiive..."

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Not having Scorpions is a trip into the danger zone.
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Today's viewings were:

 

A full revisit with John Woo's A BETTER TOMORROW (1986, DVD) and the South Korean A BETTER TOMORROW remake from 2010 (DVD):  Woo's reigns supreme of the two as well as the new 2018 remake.  It had been years since I'd seen it, probably close to twelve to be honest.  Still packs a punch.  Solid action, characters, emotion, performances and direction.  The '86 original seems so quaint compared to the widescreen epicness of both remakes, yet remains the most lean and arguably real.  Not that the Korean one is a travesty, it does what it does decently enough, but where it doesn't quite make it is that the performances lack the same electricity and empathy of the '86 and '18 versions -- and the more negative last scene falls shy by comparison...  Each film finishes a little differently.

 

Also watched Hayao Miyazaki's KIKI'S DELIVERY SERVICE (1989, DVD) and really enjoyed that.  Lots of silly fun and gorgeously drawn environments.  Really enjoyed the English voice track provided by Kirsten Dunst, Janeane Garafolo and the late Phil Hartman.  Terrific stuff.


Edited by Engineer - 1/22/18 at 10:34am
post #153034 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rene (Mr.Eko) View Post

Went out around 1 to Target to check out the $10 movie sale they had going on.

 

I had no idea that was a thing; I might have to head my way over there in the next day or two. As for Marcus Nispel directing a shitty movie that makes no sense... gee, what a shock...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrichead View Post

Anyone hear anything about this new Netflix series called Altered Carbon?

 

I heard about it from elsewhere. I imagine it won't be Freejack... for better or for worse.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post

A favorite of mine since i was a kid.

 

Oh, I did not know Lionsgate was releasing the movie on Blu via their Vestron label. That is coming next week.

 

Today was another boring day. Tonight I watched a bad movie, but at least it was one I had seen once before-as a kid-and I figured it would still suck now. Since I saw Police Academy 6: City Under Siege as a 9 year old and did not like it, I avoided the film like it was a venereal disease. Finally watching it again tonight, it's not very good, and I still like the first five. The series was just tired and most of it was just stupid instead of stupid and funny. That mayor character.... awful all around. A lot of it seemed like a cartoon or a shitty sitcom; fitting as the director was a longtime sitcom director who happened to have the legendary name of PETER BONERZ. That name is funnier than anything in the movie, BTW. The cast has some random names, from Gerrit Graham and Dean Norris in one scene to a child Allison Mack appearing for 5 seconds and a moment involving rapping where one of the rappers was randomly Grandmaster Melle Mel. I am sure Rene will agree with me that Bruce Mahler returning to the series reprising Fackler was nice but nothing will top his turn as AXEL in Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter.

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My immune system has always sucked. Even as a kid I'd get sick a lot. However, I've never had an extended run of being ill like I have this month. I've had the flu for going on 3 weeks. I've been pretty much walking around like a zombie. And just when I think I've turned the corner, i'll go back to feeling absolutely horrible. Ughhhhh.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfect Weapon View Post

 

 

Today was another boring day. Tonight I watched a bad movie, but at least it was one I had seen once before-as a kid-and I figured it would still suck now. Since I saw Police Academy 6: City Under Siege as a 9 year old and did not like it, I avoided the film like it was a venereal disease.

 

Whatever you do stay away from the 7th film. Mission in Moscow. You will weep for Christopher Lee in that one.

 

The first 5 Police Academy films are still funny. I have a soft spot for Police Academy 5: Assignment Miami Beach.

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Belated Anniversary Shout Out:

 

1/21/1983

 

 

 

I saw this one theatrically with my Dad.

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Russ Fischer: "Here’s the MANDY interview. Keep an ear open for Panos Cosmatos’s endorsement of a very controversial Friday the 13th film. "

 

https://www.facebook.com/MoviepilotDirectors/videos/1893500320692594/ …

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So I finished Blade Runner 2049 such an amazing film and I loved the twist near the end I hope they make a third film as I feel there is a lot more stories to tell in the Blade Runner Universe.

I highly recommend checking out the three short films that were made which take place between the original film and 2049, two of them 2036 Nexus Dawn and 2048 Nowhere to run are directed by Luke Scott the son of Ridley and focus on the characters of Jared Leto and Batista.

The third fim is an animated film directed by Shinichiro Watanabe who directed Cowboy Bebop and it has amazing visuals even if you are not a blade runner you should check out this mini masterpiece. Tonight I plan on watching Wolf Warrior 2 and Kickboxer:Retaliation.
post #153040 of 153737

John Squires:

 

"No Escape is seriously under-appreciated. Few movies are able to sustain heart-pounding intensity the way it does, across nearly its entire runtime. One sequence in particular - the "roof throw" - is one of the most intense scenes ever.

 

The movie is on Netflix, if you missed it."

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I just browsed Amazon looking for TIMERIDER. Holy shit, it's going for 80 bucks! (Blu)

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I've always respected him, but only recently have I elevated Robert Ryan to Lee Marvin level of awesomeness.

post #153043 of 153737

Wooooow.

 

Bilge Ebiri:

 

"MANDY: Like the Devil kidnapped Ridley Scott circa 1985. Metal af, insanely violent, surprisingly lyrical. Pretty sure I cried at the end."

 

 

"Oh man, the things Samuel Fuller could have done with Nicolas Cage."

 

"I've heard complaints about a slow first half. That's the best part. Do not change a frame."

post #153044 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrichead View Post
 

Anyone hear anything about this new Netflix series called Altered Carbon?

 

The trailer looks pretty good.

 

Just finished reading the book on which this series is based.  It's a solid read, mixing hard boiled detective noir with William Gibson level cyberpunk, and is packed full of sex and ultra-violence.  There's quite a few really cool action set-pieces in the novel, and it's going to be interesting to see how the series handles them.  I know Netflix is hoping for a franchise, as there are two more books in the series featuring the anti-hero character of Takeshi Kovacs, so hopefully this series lives up to the hype. 

post #153045 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

My immune system has always sucked. Even as a kid I'd get sick a lot. However, I've never had an extended run of being ill like I have this month. I've had the flu for going on 3 weeks. I've been pretty much walking around like a zombie. And just when I think I've turned the corner, i'll go back to feeling absolutely horrible. Ughhhhh.

 

Sorry to hear you've been ailing so long. Hope the worst of it is behind you.

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I am 50 mins into Showdown In Manila.

 

It sucks. The whole thing looks cheap and the acting terrible (Nevsky is not going to become the next Arnold). Casper Van Dien comes out the best from what i've seen so far. He's a pro and has some genuine charisma.

 

As for Dacascos "sigh". Don't expect to see a lot of him in this. This is bad. Real bad.

post #153047 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiclapinou View Post
 

Jean-Claude can't catch a break, even when he works on the best received thing he had in years, I really thought JCVJ would get another season. But it was expected that Bezos wasn't a "nice quirky show" kind of guy, especially when Netflix has a STRANGER THINGS under its belt.

 

Yeah, he and others. The fact that he got to do this show of this caliber and quality, is already something to be grateful for these days...

post #153048 of 153737

And honestly, it was a fun little ride.  But part of me is glad he won't be tied down to a show.  Hopefully, Van Damme van find something else fun to work on in the near future.

post #153049 of 153737

Good to see you on here, kain! Hope all is well with you.

post #153050 of 153737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

My immune system has always sucked. Even as a kid I'd get sick a lot. However, I've never had an extended run of being ill like I have this month.

 

Ooh, sorry to hear that.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post

Whatever you do stay away from the 7th film. Mission in Moscow. You will weep for Christopher Lee in that one.

 

Unfortunately I did see that once as a kid; it made the 6th film look good in comparison.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Russ Fischer: "Here’s the MANDY interview. 

 

I am not sure what made me chuckle more: Cage's appearance or seeing that Panos is a big bearded dude who in the interview was wearing a trucker hat.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macintosh Spice View Post
I highly recommend checking out the three short films that were made which take place between the original film and 2049

 

I saw 2049 but not the three shorts; as I'll get the Blu eventually, I'll watch those then.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

I just browsed Amazon looking for TIMERIDER. Holy shit, it's going for 80 bucks! (Blu)

 

I had no idea the Shout Factory release was such a prized commodity now.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kain424 View Post

And honestly, it was a fun little ride.  But part of me is glad he won't be tied down to a show.  Hopefully, Van Damme van find something else fun to work on in the near future.

 

Seeing that kain made his first post here in almost 3 years:

 

 

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