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The Best of BOND; Let's get this over with - Page 3

post #101 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike1983
Best bond girl = Halle Berry,Babara Bach.
She gives a terrible performance, she's hot, but in this one, not at all sexy. There is a difference. Bond girls are supposed to be exotic and sexy, and Berry just feels wrong in the entire film. Her fight sequences are laughable, especially her ridiculous quick draw when she kills the doctor in Cuba. Bad all the way around.

Barbara Bach is the opposite, and therefore yes, one of the best.
post #102 of 16635
Thread Starter 
I've been making my way through all the movies again, having not seen some of them in over twenty years. I got around to Moonraker a few days ago. I'd been wondering whether my dislike of it was exaggerated. Well I didn't think this was possible, but it's even worse than I remembered.

The transition from one sequence to another is completely disjointed; there's no logic in what follows from what, there's no plot reason for going from this location to that location...it's just a matter of finding the next good location for an action sequence. Bond escapes from a situation, and goes halfway around the world, where someone inexplicably starts chasing him again. Then Jaws makes a funny face and falls from a great height. It's actually the jokiness that bothers me the most. Besides Richard Kiel being forced to turn Jaws into a clown, there are jokey musical references to other films. The whole thing has the air of being made to appeal to kids. In fact, if you watch the half-hour doc on the DVD, they talk about getting letters from kids asking why Jaws couldn't be a good guy; lo and behold, Jaws becomes a good guy. And they as much as admit that making Moonraker instead of For Your Eyes Only was an attempt to cash in on the success of Star Wars.

The performances are awful (especially from the admittedly gorgeous Lois Chiles). Action sequences end badly, especially the centrifuge bit. If the centrifuge is controlled from a booth above, how does Bond shooting a dart from inside the car make it stop? And the hovercraft gondola? No. But perhaps the movies' greatest sin is that it's boring up until the point that it turns completely stupid, which is once they get into space. Who knew laser pistols were commonplace in 1979? Or that the United States had a detachment of marines outfitted with maneuvering spacesuits with laser cannons? Not to mention that Drax's master plan is a carbon copy of Stromberg's in The Spy Who Loved Me, substituting underwater for outer space.

Derek Meddings and John Barry seem to be the only ones on task; the effects, especially the miniature work, are superb, and the score is memorable and atmospheric. Everyone else was overdosing on the stupid pills.

Sorry to get long-winded, but I hate this movie. People love to dogpile on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, but Moonraker is the real pile. The definite low point for the series, especially coming off the excellent The Spy Who Loved Me, certainly the height of Moore's reign in the role.
post #103 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
People love to dogpile on On Her Majesty's Secret Service
This has never been my experience. I started a thread on it a while ago that got a lot of replies, almost all of which were extremely positive. It's a great Bond film, hampered only by the fact that Lazenby as Bond is an oddity.
post #104 of 16635
I think it got a bit of a thrashing when it was first released, but it has definitely withstood the test of time.
post #105 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai
I think it got a bit of a thrashing when it was first released, but it has definitely withstood the test of time.
Also, in 1969, there had yet to be a "bad" James Bond film. It had been all Connery flicks, all pretty good. OHMSS probably seemed terribly disappointing being Lazenby and very different from those flicks, but juxtaposed with "Diamonds Are Forever" and a lot of the Moore films, the standard for being a "good James Bond movie" changes.
post #106 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Also, in 1969, there had yet to be a "bad" James Bond film. It had been all Connery flicks, all pretty good.
I dunno-- You Only Live Twice is pretty gimmicky with its forced-perspective volcano set and Connery trying to pass for Japanese. I'm not a big fan of Donald Pleasance's Blofeld either.
post #107 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead
I dunno-- You Only Live Twice is pretty gimmicky with its forced-perspective volcano set and Connery trying to pass for Japanese. I'm not a big fan of Donald Pleasance's Blofeld either.
Gimmicky maybe, but lots of fun. I don't think any Bond film since has been able to top the spectacle of the final battle in the volcano base. Plus as a kid Little Nellie alone was enough to get 4 stars from me.
post #108 of 16635
Thread Starter 
I guess that's my perspective because I grew up in the 70's, when everybody thought On Her Majesty's Secret Service was horrible. How they could think that after sitting through Live and Let Die, I'm not sure. I think it really did just catch a lot of flack for not starring Connery. People must have assumed that he'd play the part forever, and at the time, he must have seemed crazy to give it up. In retrospect, it doesn't seem to have hurt him.
post #109 of 16635
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead
I dunno-- You Only Live Twice is pretty gimmicky with its forced-perspective volcano set and Connery trying to pass for Japanese. I'm not a big fan of Donald Pleasance's Blofeld either.
I love Pleasance's Blofeld, myself. He's got the crazy eyes. Plus, at least his version has earlobes. I have to agree, though, that the whole Japanese disguise thing was wrong-headed and embarrassing. Maybe if they'd actually succeeded in making him look remotely Asian, it wouldn't be so bad. All they did was give him a Vulcan haircut.
post #110 of 16635
YOLT is not perfect, but it is great Bond spectacle, it starred Connery, and it was a bit hit that was considered another good Bond film. How it stands today is irrelevant though because we were saying why OHMSS was savaged in its day and has now gotten quite a respectable reputation. Until it, they all starred Connery and were, more or less, successful crowd-pleasers. It may have taken a while for the series to get back on track, but that doesn't mean OHMSS isn't a great Bond film.
post #111 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
I've been making my way through all the movies again, having not seen some of them in over twenty years. I got around to Moonraker a few days ago. I'd been wondering whether my dislike of it was exaggerated. Well I didn't think this was possible, but it's even worse than I remembered.

The transition from one sequence to another is completely disjointed; there's no logic in what follows from what, there's no plot reason for going from this location to that location...it's just a matter of finding the next good location for an action sequence. Bond escapes from a situation, and goes halfway around the world, where someone inexplicably starts chasing him again. Then Jaws makes a funny face and falls from a great height. It's actually the jokiness that bothers me the most. Besides Richard Kiel being forced to turn Jaws into a clown, there are jokey musical references to other films. The whole thing has the air of being made to appeal to kids. In fact, if you watch the half-hour doc on the DVD, they talk about getting letters from kids asking why Jaws couldn't be a good guy; lo and behold, Jaws becomes a good guy. And they as much as admit that making Moonraker instead of For Your Eyes Only was an attempt to cash in on the success of Star Wars.

The performances are awful (especially from the admittedly gorgeous Lois Chiles). Action sequences end badly, especially the centrifuge bit. If the centrifuge is controlled from a booth above, how does Bond shooting a dart from inside the car make it stop? And the hovercraft gondola? No. But perhaps the movies' greatest sin is that it's boring up until the point that it turns completely stupid, which is once they get into space. Who knew laser pistols were commonplace in 1979? Or that the United States had a detachment of marines outfitted with maneuvering spacesuits with laser cannons? Not to mention that Drax's master plan is a carbon copy of Stromberg's in The Spy Who Loved Me, substituting underwater for outer space.

Derek Meddings and John Barry seem to be the only ones on task; the effects, especially the miniature work, are superb, and the score is memorable and atmospheric. Everyone else was overdosing on the stupid pills.

Sorry to get long-winded, but I hate this movie. People love to dogpile on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, but Moonraker is the real pile. The definite low point for the series, especially coming off the excellent The Spy Who Loved Me, certainly the height of Moore's reign in the role.

I think you're talking Mr. Bond waay too seriously, but different strokes, different folks. I have fun with it so who knows?

The real piles are A View to a Kill and Live and Let Die.
post #112 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
It may not be funny, but I don't think Brosnan was ever better with a one liner than during his execution of Vincent Schiavelli.

"Wait, I'm just a professional doing a job!"

"Me too."

Bang.

"Tomorrow Never Dies" sometimes takes a beating, and yes, it's got a ton of action. But Bond as a character is maybe as good as Brosnan got to do. Definitely the closest he came to the Dalton/Connery level of performance.

I love the film. I think it's Brosnan's best. Some terrific action, great one-liners and I love the bit with him in the remote-controlled car just grinning like a madman. Michelle Yeoh was one of the best Bond girls ever.
I liked Pryce as the baddie. Something different than the standard, world dominating stuff. Stamper was a cool henchman.
post #113 of 16635
I enjoy TOMORROW NEVER DIES quite a bit, even if it does feel like nothing but non-stop action and fun Bond clichés for 90 minutes before the filmmakers suddenly thought, "Oh yeah, we should probably try to work a story in here somewhere." It's a bimbo of a film but a fairly hot bimbo it is.

The "backseat driver" BMW chase still ranks high on my all-time favorite Bond action scenes list.
post #114 of 16635
I enjoyed Tomorrow, but didn't think it was anything special. Pryce is such a terribly unthreatening villain ("watch me beat CNN's ratings!"), the ending reminded me too much of The Spy Who Loved Me (complete with Jaws, er, I mean Stamper), and Pryce's plot seemed more than a little suspect. Some great action scenes though, especially the chopper chasing the motorcycle.

Then again I've only since it maybe twice and not recently, so perhaps I should give it another look.
post #115 of 16635
Thread Starter 
What bugs me about Tomorrow Never Dies is that there's a section in which Bond becomes a complete moron. He walks right up to the bad guy, tells him his name, says he knows what he's up to, and announces that he's going to stop him. A few minutes later, some thugs show up and ask Bond to go with them. So he does...and he walks out in front of them, allowing them to sucker punch him.

Remember when Bond was a spy? He'd give a fake name, have a cover for being there, gather information on the villain's plot. Yeah, they did away with that. British Intelligence just sends him in to blow shit up now.
post #116 of 16635
I think you guys are maybe missing the real charm of Diamonds Are Forever. It's easily the funniest Bond movie, the villains rock, and Connery gives one of his best and most enjoyable performances.

Its main virtue is its nasty, sarcastic tone. The same can be said for the other two movies Tom Mankiewicz helped to script, which were LALD and TMWTGG, but this is the one in which it works best.

It's actually a lot like Superman, which Mankiewicz also mostly scripted.

That said, Goldfinger is the best, and Licence to Kill... by far... the worst. When a James Bond movie stars Grand L Bush, you know it's in trouble. Just throw in Dolph Lundgren and you have yourself a straight-to-video extravaganza.

And yes, I know, Dolph Lundgren was in AVTAK.
post #117 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
Remember when Bond was a spy? He'd give a fake name, have a cover for being there, gather information on the villain's plot. Yeah, they did away with that. British Intelligence just sends him in to blow shit up now.
Yeah, I agree about the whole cover identity thing. I always thought it was weird that Bond would go to Carver's party pretending to be a banker but still use his real name, practically yelling it out for everyone at the party to hear. I mean, the guy has been at the center of more world-saving missions than Jesus, and he just throws his name around like no one would possibly recognize it? (Honestly, I just think they needed him to say his trademark "Bond...James Bond" line for the trailer and that was the only scene that seemed to fit.)

And I also agree that Carver is an incredibly weak villain with a ridiculously irrelevant evil plot. Which is a shame because I thought Jonathan Pryce would make for a definitive Bond villain. Instead, he just turned out to be the most aggressive typist in 007's rogue gallery.

That's why I called TOMORROW NEVER DIES a bimbo of a film. Fun and sexy on the surface but dumb as a bag of rocks. But it also features David Arnold's best, throw-in-the-kitchen-sink Bond score...a much needed antidote to Eric Serra's admirable failure, GOLDENEYE.
post #118 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul McCartney
I think you guys are maybe missing the real charm of Diamonds Are Forever. It's easily the funniest Bond movie, the villains rock, and Connery gives one of his best and most enjoyable performances.
This makes your credibility pretty questionable in regards to the Bond series.

Quote:
That said, Goldfinger is the best, and Licence to Kill... by far... the worst.
And this confirms it.
post #119 of 16635
I'm pleased by the seemingly growing reputation for "Tomorrow Never Dies". Brosnan gives his best performance, and it has some fantastic Bond moments. The BMW chase is genius, the best action sequence of the Brosnan era. Jonathan Pryce may not be threatening, but when has the main villain really be legitimately threatening? Few and far between. That's the job of the henchm,an, and Gotz Otto as Mr. Stamper is great stuff. I love the twisted laugh he gives when stabbed in the finale.

Michelle Yeoh is good old fashioned Bond casting, an international star who actually deserves to be there. It's a pity that Desmond Llewellyn couldn't go out on this film, his best and most charming appearance as Q in quite a while, and worlds better than the retarded and heavy-handed "I'm going to die soon" send-off he gets in "The World Is Not Enough".

Great Bond movie.
post #120 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
This makes your credibility pretty questionable in regards to the Bond series.
Check out his comments about RAIDERS in the "Worst Line That Thinks It's A Great Line" thread. So far, this guy is borderline troll.

http://chud.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1649216
post #121 of 16635
I can't help it. RAIDERS is a great, great movie. It's just that Karen Allen raises my hackles. I seriously expected at least ONE poster to find her kind of annoying. So far, I stand alone. Like a bitch.

And DAF is a fun movie made by filmmakers who are clearly pretty smart and are having a good time. LTK looks like it should be on TV at around 2.30 a.m., and star Lorenzo Lamas. DAD would easily take out the title of "Worst Bond Ever", were it not for the fact it looks like it cost more than $5 million, a claim that LTK cannot make.

And the best book: probably Dr. No
post #122 of 16635
Thread Starter 
I just watched Never Say Never Again for the first time since its original release. If we count that film, it throws many wrenches into the machinery. Worst theme song, for one. I may have to call in sick tomorrow.
post #123 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
If we count that film, it throws many wrenches into the machinery. Worst theme song, for one.

Oh, HELL yes.

However, I award it the crowns for "Best Use of Jazzercise Music" and "Lamest Videogame" in a Bond film.
post #124 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
I just watched Never Say Never Again for the first time since its original release. If we count that film, it throws many wrenches into the machinery. Worst theme song, for one. I may have to call in sick tomorrow.
Not so fast gentlemen. I'm going to risk it all here and say I like NSNA better than Thunderball, which I always found a little too mellow.

The major problem with NSNA is the absence of the Bond theme music, which leaves one straining expectantly in vain to hear it.
post #125 of 16635
Thread Starter 
Too mellow? Have you seen both films lately? Never Say Never Again is practically sleepwalking. Thunderball ends with dozens of men having an underwater battle with spearguns. Never Say Never Again ends with a two-man underwater wrestling match.

And I'm sorry, but any film that ends with the lead winking at the camera has to go.
post #126 of 16635
At least you can tell who the players are in Never's scuba sequences.

And Barbara Carrera is the clear winner of the Fatima Blush competition.
post #127 of 16635
NSNA? You people are crazy.
post #128 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
Too mellow? Have you seen both films lately? Never Say Never Again is practically sleepwalking. Thunderball ends with dozens of men having an underwater battle with spearguns. Never Say Never Again ends with a two-man underwater wrestling match.

And I'm sorry, but any film that ends with the lead winking at the camera has to go.
NSNA has the wild piss fight in the hospital (?), a solid motorcycle chase, and the concluding shootout in the grotto. Not to mention the classic pen scene.

The lengthy underwater scene in Thunderball never really grabbed me. Sort of slow really. The rest of the film reminds me too much of Dr. No. And I much prefer the chicks in NSNA.

Plus I believe Steven Seagal was Connery's martial arts advisor or some such thing.
post #129 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
I'm pleased by the seemingly growing reputation for "Tomorrow Never Dies". Brosnan gives his best performance, and it has some fantastic Bond moments. The BMW chase is genius, the best action sequence of the Brosnan era. Jonathan Pryce may not be threatening, but when has the main villain really be legitimately threatening? Few and far between. That's the job of the henchm,an, and Gotz Otto as Mr. Stamper is great stuff. I love the twisted laugh he gives when stabbed in the finale.

Michelle Yeoh is good old fashioned Bond casting, an international star who actually deserves to be there. It's a pity that Desmond Llewellyn couldn't go out on this film, his best and most charming appearance as Q in quite a while, and worlds better than the retarded and heavy-handed "I'm going to die soon" send-off he gets in "The World Is Not Enough".

Great Bond movie.
See Michelle Yeoh and the action is what keeps Tomorrow Never Dies above water when it comes to The World is Not Enough and Die Another Day.

Saying that its still brought down by a terrible story and an incredibly weak villain. Mr Stamper might as well have been called Mr transparent and been played by Judd Nelson. He seemed more like a villain cut from the cloth of Johnny Quest than 007.

After witnessing one of the finest 007 villains (006 in Goldeneye) in the last picture (and watch the hand to hand fighting between Brosnan and Bean capped perfectly with James capping him with the 45) we got Mr transparent being knifed while giggling in some giant floating stealth tampon. Still I liked the BMW piece and the Chopper scene. I just find that Tomorrow was the film that started to show 007 was falling off.
post #130 of 16635
I don't hate NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN. I maintain that if it had the official 007 staples of the opening gunbarrel, overblown title sequence and a real score using the Bond theme, it would be ranked in the top half of all Bond films. And in many ways (but certainly not entirely), I also prefer it to THUNDERBALL. And yet still, in its current form, it feels like a shoddy counterfeit, even if it has many admirable elements.

It's strange that Irvin Kershner directed three genre sequels in the '80s: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN and ROBOCOP 2. The first had one of the greatest film scores ever composed. The latter two were both cursed with painfully wretched scores. And yet, I truly believe that if you simply shitcan Leonard Rosenman's hilariously bad ROBOCOP 2 score and even just replace it with existing cues from Basil Poledouris' highly effective music from the first film, you would have a significantly-improved film.

I think the same is true of NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN. Rescore it with existing John Barry cues and watch a far, far better film emerge.
post #131 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Daywalker
After witnessing one of the finest 007 villains (006 in Goldeneye) in the last picture (and watch the hand to hand fighting between Brosnan and Bean capped perfectly with James capping him with the 45)
I remember them falling to the bottom of the array, with Bond hanging onto 006 for one final exchange: "For England, James?" "No. For me." And then Bond let 006 drop to his near-death. The collapsing array later finished the job. I don't remember Bond "capping" 006 with a .45 but it's been a while since I've seen GOLDENEYE.
post #132 of 16635
Stealth tampon? What are you, nine?
post #133 of 16635
I'm 8 actually good sir.
post #134 of 16635
Jonathan Pryce felt like a Bond villain to me. He's over the top, nasty, and a guy you want to see get ground up in a giant shredder. No problems there for me, and while Stamper may not be the most flamboyant or important henchman in history, I'll take him over a lot of them, especially Rick Yune's Zao from DAD. That guy got more screentime, more makeup, and more action sequences than a lot of henchman, and is still easily in the running for the worst.

I recently rewatched "Never Say Never Again". It's not great, but it's far from as terrible as I had thought I might find it all these years later. "Thunderball" is okay, but not a favorite. The underwater fight has never thrilled me at all.
post #135 of 16635
No argument about Rick Yune as Zao. Die Another Day has nothing going for it outside of Rosamund Pike (and she wasn't even that good in it). Tomorrow Never Dies at least has some great qualities.
post #136 of 16635
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litmus Configuration
I don't hate NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN. I maintain that if it had the official 007 staples of the opening gunbarrel, overblown title sequence and a real score using the Bond theme, it would be ranked in the top half of all Bond films. And in many ways (but certainly not entirely), I also prefer it to THUNDERBALL. And yet still, in its current form, it feels like a shoddy counterfeit, even if it has many admirable elements.

It's strange that Irvin Kershner directed three genre sequels in the '80s: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN and ROBOCOP 2. The first had one of the greatest film scores ever composed. The latter two were both cursed with painfully wretched scores. And yet, I truly believe that if you simply shitcan Leonard Rosenman's hilariously bad ROBOCOP 2 score and even just replace it with existing cues from Basil Poledouris' highly effective music from the first film, you would have a significantly-improved film.

I think the same is true of NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN. Rescore it with existing John Barry cues and watch a far, far better film emerge.
Even if Never Say Never Again had all of the official Bond touches, it would still be hamstrung by being a remake. They didn't even change the names of the supporting characters. Everything I like in the movie is in the first half-hour; the stuff about Bond's career being in a downturn, and getting back into condition is all good. In fact, I wish the rest of the movie had made more of an issue of his age. I quite like Barbara Carrerra, but Kim Basinger, as she so often does, sucks. Max Von Sydow, while utterly failing to be bald, would make quite a good Blofeld with more screentime. And I have to admit that it's cool to see SPECTRE back in the game. I really wish McClory would stop being such a pissant and just charge for the use of that stuff.

I fully agree about the score. I like Michel LeGrand's score for Richard Lester's The Three Musketeers, but he utterly fails on this film. And as I said, the opening theme song makes me violently ill. It makes Madonna's Die Another Day sound like Mozart. Awful.

Also, whoever thought it would be cool to replace Bond and Largo's bacarat showdown with a glorified game of Missile Command needed to be kicked really, really hard.

It's certainly not among the worst overall. But it's not particularly good.
post #137 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
Even if Never Say Never Again had all of the official Bond touches, it would still be hamstrung by being a remake.
I guess that doesn't bode well for CASINO ROYALE then, which presumably will have all those touches. I know that the new film will be radically different than the original spoof, so I understand what you're saying -- but I disagree. I think what hamstrings NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN most is that it feels counterfeit.

Quote:
Everything I like in the movie is in the first half-hour; the stuff about Bond's career being in a downturn, and getting back into condition is all good. In fact, I wish the rest of the movie had made more of an issue of his age. I quite like Barbara Carrerra, but Kim Basinger, as she so often does, sucks.
Agreed on all points. But as vapid as Basinger's performance is, she's easy on the eyes, as befits her role as a Bond girl. She's certainly no worse than Tanya Roberts, Denise Richards or even Academy Award™-winning Halle "Your Mama!" Berry.

Quote:
Max Von Sydow, while utterly failing to be bald, would make quite a good Blofeld with more screentime.
Not the first hirsute Blofeld either. I quite liked Von Sydow as well.

Quote:
Also, whoever thought it would be cool to replace Bond and Largo's bacarat showdown with a glorified game of Missile Command needed to be kicked really, really hard.
Hey, it was the '80s. It could have been worse. They could have battled over Dig Dug.
post #138 of 16635
The video game showdown is indeed bad, and some stuff doesn't work with "NSNA". But I think overall, it actually proves you can make a decent remake. It's problems are in its little elements, I think its pleasures and strengths are actually in what they do to tweak and alter the fundamental story. Von Sydow as Blofeld, aging Bond, black Felix, a slightly more fleshed out Largo, all of them were nice changes.

And as for DAD, Rosamund Pike I think gets more of a pass than she should just because the bar had gotten so miserably low and because Berry was so much worse. She's basically the inconsequential Bond girl, and while passable, she's not threatening, and not terribly interesting. I'm much more interested in the new faces they have now and Eva Green.
post #139 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
Also, whoever thought it would be cool to replace Bond and Largo's bacarat showdown with a glorified game of Missile Command needed to be kicked really, really hard.
I don't know about you, but first seeing that film as a kid I thought the video game looked infinitely cooler than baccarat. I remember wishing it was available in the arcades.

Besides I believe Bond plays baccarat in the competing Octopussy, so they probably wanted to set themselves apart.
post #140 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desslar
Besides I believe Bond plays baccarat in the competing Octopussy, so they probably wanted to set themselves apart.
I think it's illuminating that it took this long for anyone to bring up Octopussy at all. Head-to-head, NSNA had more class in 1983, and still does.
post #141 of 16635
Thread Starter 
Sure, but Austin Powers is a better Bond film than Octopussy. That's not exactly putting the bar out of reach.
post #142 of 16635
I'm not afraid to say I like Octopussy (say, that could be a neat bumper sticker). Thanks to all the official Bond touches I think it's a little ahead of NSNA. It's a tough call.
post #143 of 16635
Thread Starter 
So that means, by extension, that you think Octopussy is better than Thunderball. You're just full of disturbing little revelations in this thread, aintcha?
post #144 of 16635
I have always been in the minority during Bond discussions. I cannot help my own taste.

Favorite Bond - Roger Moore
Favorite Film(s) - Live and Let Die/License To Kill/Dr No
Favorite Villain - Donald Pleasance's Blofeld
Favorite Bond Girl - Jane Freaking Seymour
Favorite Baddie Death - Zerbe Blowup
Least deserving of fan loathing - Dalton
Overhyped 60's Snoozer - Thunderball
Least Favorite Film(s) - Die Another Day/Thunderball

Happily looking forward to a Brosnan-less film
post #145 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
So that means, by extension, that you think Octopussy is better than Thunderball. You're just full of disturbing little revelations in this thread, aintcha?
Did I say something disturbing? I certainly find Octopussy more entertaining than Thunderball, yes. I don't think I'm alone in the Octopussy love... Anyone? Bueller?
post #146 of 16635
I enjoy Octopussy more than Thunderball by a mile, but I still have trouble saying that title around my mother.


Not that my mother and I speak of Bond often, but you know what I mean.

Twins, Trains, Clowns, Berkoff....what's not to love?
post #147 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Kinski
I enjoy Octopussy more than Thunderball by a mile, but I still have trouble saying that title around my mother.
Yeah, I still can't believe they had the balls to use that title. I can just imagine the marketing department sobbing uncontrollably.

Quote:
Twins, Trains, Clowns, Berkoff....what's not to love?
Berkoff is always a treat. He should have done more action films. He had a great run there for a few years with Octopussy, Beverly Hills Cop, and Rambo II. Also did an excellent Hitler in the miniseries War and Remembrance.
post #148 of 16635
OCTOPUSSY is okay. It's my third-favorite Moore film, behind FOR YOUR EYES ONLY and THE SPY WHO LOVED ME, respectively. It has yet another lovely John Barry score, some fun action sequences and a well-developed, age-appropriate Bond woman in the title role.

And forget all the T-shirts for SNAKES ON A PLANE. Now I want a T-shirt that says "Zerbe Blowup."
post #149 of 16635
Thread Starter 
The fact that Bond spends the climax of Octopussy dressed in a clown suit is symbolic of what was wrong with the Moore years.

I just rewatched For Your Eyes Only, and that's a Moore Bond film I like. The only thing that really doesn't work is the music. Bill Conti, who I normally like, went all disco here. First of all, it dates the movie badly, and secondly, isn't 1981 a little late to be flogging that horse anyway? The theme song is merely bland, but I hate that they put Sheena Easton in the opening credit sequence. Sure she's hot, but that's what music videos are for.

Here we saw the beginning of reigning in Bond's libido, reducing him to one woman, in the person of Carole Bouquet. But hell, look at her; I'd concentrate too. She's not much of an actor, but I guess when you're flawlessly gorgeous, talent is just dead weight. Besides, Julian Glover and Topol can pick up the slack.

What's really nice after the embarrassment of Moonraker is that the jokiness is toned way down. It's a lot easier to build tension when you don't have bad guys who go down like Wile E Coyote every other scene.

Interesting bit #1: Charles Dance shows up in a tiny nonspeaking role as a generic glowering thug. He does indeed glower brilliantly.

Interesting bit #2: There's a sequence with two minisubs that's eerily similar to the business in The Abyss eight years later. I've never accused Cameron of undue originality.
post #150 of 16635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
The fact that Bond spends the climax of Octopussy dressed in a clown suit is symbolic of what was wrong with the Moore years..
Amen. There's nothing else to say for me. Bond dressed as a clown is unforgivable, plain and simple. I carry very little out of that film otherwise, but it's a sin against the series that makes it one of the very worst Bond films.
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