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The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 23

post #1101 of 1226

Bernard Herrmann would have been 100 years old today. His music, of course, remains ageless:

 

Vertigo

 

Cape Fear

 

The Day the Earth Stood Still

 

Hangover Square

 

The 7th Voyage of Sinbad

 

Psycho

 

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

post #1102 of 1226

I'm a big fan of his OBSESSION score:

 

post #1103 of 1226

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

I'm a big fan of his OBSESSION score:

 

Same here.  It's got an unnerving element of aggression that I also enjoy in his THE ROADBUILDER/NIGHT DIGGER score.  For me there's something especially weird about using an harmonica in anything other than a western or comedy film.

 

 

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

Bernard Herrmann would have been 100 years old today. His music, of course, remains ageless:

 

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir



I caught this on TCM not too long ago and wept like a baby (my wife was merciless for the rest of the day!).  I'm not one for soppy/sappy romance films, but damn if this isn't one of the most perfect efforts from Herrmann.  The stark cinematography, the poignant agonies of the protagonists...he captures it perfectly and helps deliver a finale that's both heartbreaking and uplifting.

 

 

post #1104 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by soylentgreen View Post

I caught this on TCM not too long ago and wept like a baby (my wife was merciless for the rest of the day!).  I'm not one for soppy/sappy romance films, but damn if this isn't one of the most perfect efforts from Herrmann.  The stark cinematography, the poignant agonies of the protagonists...he captures it perfectly and helps deliver a finale that's both heartbreaking and uplifting.



It's one of my all-time favorite films, and it always wrecks me.

 

post #1105 of 1226

Bought a CD of Jerry Goldsmith's Legend score for fifty cents at a Salvation Army.

post #1106 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barkatthemoon View Post

Bought a CD of Jerry Goldsmith's Legend score for fifty cents at a Salvation Army.



Great score!

 

Brian Eno has been kicking ass for me lately with his APOLLO soundscapes from For All Mankind and his contribution to David Lynch's DUNE.

post #1107 of 1226
post #1108 of 1226
post #1109 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

You asked for it:

 

http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/16434/1941-2-CD-EXPANDED/



I'm buying the shit out of this.

post #1110 of 1226
post #1111 of 1226

Recently revisited parts of HULK, and I have to say the movie is much better than most remember, and better than I gave it credit for back in the day. Among the more successful and thrilling aspects of the film would be the score, which stands IMHO as one of the best superhero scores for a MARVEL character

post #1112 of 1226

New from FSM: Five-disc set of Miklos Rosza's Ben-Hur.

post #1113 of 1226

I just got the score to...John Carter, by Michael Giacchino, and it is...Glorious!

post #1114 of 1226

Goldsmith fans... gaze upon this. Holy crap. It's real, and it's out on June 5.

 

250

post #1115 of 1226

Oh god damn it. It even has the Shaun Cassidy single.


Edited by Hammerhead - 5/17/12 at 2:55pm
post #1116 of 1226

Bernard Herrmann's dead, but It's Alive!

post #1117 of 1226

I am currently blissing out to this:

 

Blade Runner 30th Anniversary Celebration

 

I can't even comprehend how difficult it must have been to reconstruct this score entirely by ear.

post #1118 of 1226

Some good ones I've been listening to lately.  All great stuff...

 

MEANWHILE (score by Hal Hartley, 2012)

THE TWIN PEAKS ARCHIVES from davidlynch.com (scores by Lynch & Angelo Badalamenti, 1990-1992/2012)

SOUTHLAND TALES (score by Moby, 2006)

LOS ANGELES, NOVEMBER 2019 (an audio "environmental soundscape" of BLADE RUNNER, various, compiled 2003)

AMATEUR (score by Hal Hartley and songs by various artists, 1994)

FISHING WITH JOHN (score by John Lurie, 1993/1998)

THE ROCKETEER (score by James Horner, 1991)

MOON 44 (score by Joel Goldsmith, 1990)

DIRTY HARRY (score by Lalo Schifrin, 1971)

THE DETECTIVE (score by Jerry Goldsmith, 1968)

ASCENSEUR POUR L'ECHAFAUD aka ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS (score by Miles Davis, 1958)


Edited by Engineer - 10/2/12 at 9:05pm
post #1119 of 1226

Wanted to throw some more love in John Powell's direction. Along with Michael Giacchino, he's one of the few composers working in the "memorable themes/leitmotifs" game today, and a good chunk of this is in his stellar animated work. Even for the lesser Blue Sky or DreamWorks outings he's done, Powell has always delivered a knock-out score.

 

My particular favorites are his collaborations with Harry Gregson-Williams on Antz, Chicken Run, and the original Shrek; his work with Hans Zimmer on the Kung Fu Panda films; and of course, How To Train Your Dragon, which has quickly become of my favorite scores of all time. "This is Berk", "Test Drive" and everything involving the final battle particularly give me goosebumps.

post #1120 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

How To Train Your Dragon, which has quickly become of my favorite scores of all time. "This is Berk", "Test Drive" and everything involving the final battle particularly give me goosebumps.

 

Seconding the Powell love, particularly How to Train Your Dragon.  "Forbidden Friendship" is a personal favorite as well.

 

I also recommend some of his earlier stuff.  The score to the '99 documentary Endurance is pretty great.  Some highlights:

 

"Main Titles"

"Chasing the Bull"  (I really love the brass around the 57 second mark.)

"Mother"

"The Great Tree"

"The Final Race"

post #1121 of 1226

My Xmas present to myself: The extremely rare, limited-edition CD of Georges Delerue's Joe Versus the Volcano. The unused track Brain Cloud and the 9-minute continuous presentation of The Storm/The Rescue are pretty much worth the whole thing.

post #1122 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

My Xmas present to myself: The extremely rare, limited-edition CD of Georges Delerue's Joe Versus the Volcano. The unused track Brain Cloud and the 9-minute continuous presentation of The Storm/The Rescue are pretty much worth the whole thing.

 

Going to have to watch this again - I never paid attention to the score. I'm due for a rewatch, anyway.

post #1123 of 1226

It's a film that rewards with age.

post #1124 of 1226

I've gotten a lot of shit for it over the years, but it's easily one of my favorite films of all time.  And yes, the score is fantastic, and well worth the money.  Only downside is that they include the Waponi's Hava Nagila chant, but not the dinner/bathing preparation one.

post #1125 of 1226

Too bad, too, since I would easily give up "Shopping Spree" and/or "Fishing" to make disc space. They're useful as footnotes, but the songs that replaced them were better choices.

post #1126 of 1226

Anyone else notice that Danny Elfman and Sam Raimi are working together again, on Oz?  I hope this means they've mended their friendship and inspires Elfman to bring his A game.

post #1127 of 1226
It saddens me that there will never be another Basil Poledouris scored film. His work on Conan is forever linked with that character in my mind. I hear it and I'm ten years old again.
post #1128 of 1226

The recent rerecording of Conan the Destroyer utilizes orchestrations that got dropped from the soundtrack sessions for budget reasons. Also, as a bonus all the cues from the Universal Studios stunt show are performed as well.

post #1129 of 1226

post #1130 of 1226

Nice.  Some of it reminds me of Sunshine.

post #1131 of 1226

Digging it. And yeah, it does remind one of SUNSHINE's score.

post #1132 of 1226

Finally got a copy of one of my all-time favorite soundtracks: The Fugitive by James Newton Howard. Its awesomeness is diminished only by the fact that there's also a two disc extended score available. Why is it that you always find out about these things after you've bought something?

post #1133 of 1226

I've been meaning to get a copy of Ennio Morricone's score for THE THING but it's cover has always looked like one of those arranged-with-a-shopping-mall-synthesizer -albums. But then I looked up who the guys mentioned on the cover are, who I just assumed were just some wallmart-muzak-wizards. Found out three things: I am a moron, Alan Howarth and Larry Hopkins are legendary professionals who deserve to punch me in the face, and the album is amazing.

 

I understood the album has all of Morricone's work, including the stuff Carpenter opted not to use. Which is understandable, while good pieces on their own, I can't imagine "Sterilization", "Eternity" or "Humanity 2" working anywhere in the film. But Morricone's work has an incredible feeling of isolation and dread, perfect music for the winter months. We should be some kind of a blizzard around evening rush hour, looking forward to listening to this on my way home.

 

<edited to correct track titles>


Edited by Virtanen - 11/21/14 at 8:30am
post #1134 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virtanen View Post
 

Alan Howarth and Larry Hopkins are legendary professionals

 

Alan Howarth shows up in my music collection 3 times. Escape from New York, Prince of Darkness and Halloween III.

 

Those credits alone deserve credit.


Edited by andrewhawkins - 11/21/14 at 2:41am
post #1135 of 1226

Update: there really was a motherfucker of a snow storm here, cars crawling along (why the hell are you people still driving with summer tyres?!), darkness and snow everywhere. Took the soundtrack to a whole another level, they should play it on buses and trains all winter. Especially this track:

 

post #1136 of 1226

When Michael Bay's THE ISLAND was released, I grabbed the soundtrack by Steve Jablonski.  There are a few scores that I'm sort of indifferent to in my collection, but this opening track always stuck with me in the same what that that one track from SUNSHINE does.  

 

 

post #1137 of 1226

Finally found a bootleg of Jerry Goldsmith's marvelous score for THE BURBS. Amazing stuff, the score does an incredible job of balancing the comedic themes, the horror elements, tragic themes and the italo western influences. On paper those are miles apart and have nothing to do with each other, but Goldsmith weaves them together like a master. He truly was one of the greats.

 

So, I'd rate the score 'bout nine at the tension scale.

post #1138 of 1226

Nice!  The main title theme is one of those songs I often harken back to when I'm biking if it's a particularly nice day.  The part heard at 0.00 - 0.50 and 3.20 - 4.02, specifically.

 

 

post #1139 of 1226

Wang Chung 

 

They only composed one movie but To Live and Die in LA was so, so good.  Love the music and all the songs.  

post #1140 of 1226

Yep, a classic.  Love it, myself.  In high school I even scored two scenes in 3/4" video projects with two tracks from the score.  And this was back in 1988!

post #1141 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Virtanen View Post
 

Finally found a bootleg of Jerry Goldsmith's marvelous score for THE BURBS. Amazing stuff, the score does an incredible job of balancing the comedic themes, the horror elements, tragic themes and the italo western influences. On paper those are miles apart and have nothing to do with each other, but Goldsmith weaves them together like a master. He truly was one of the greats.

 

So, I'd rate the score 'bout nine at the tension scale.

 

One of my all time favorites, from Goldsmith un-ironically using a synth dog bark in the opening, to him riffing on his own Patton score in the brownie scene, to the western riff in "Ray Peterson, Neighbor from Hell."  I love all that guy's stuff with Dante.  Explorers, Burbs, Innerspace, Gremlins, et. al.

post #1142 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Engineer View Post

Nice!  The main title theme is one of those songs I often harken back to when I'm biking if it's a particularly nice day.  The part heard at 0.00 - 0.50 and 3.20 - 4.02, specifically.




Holy shit, just listen to this right here. You go from Engineer casually cycling his neighborhood, to Incubus & Succubus getting serious, to creepy John Carpenter synth action, and then the horn section turns it into a larger than life western. And all this sounds so effortless and graceful. This tune always makes me want to break into my Eastern European neighbor's house!
post #1143 of 1226

Fellow Chewer Richard Dickson called this to my attention. Haven't seen the film yet, but holy fuck. Feels more like a propulsive horror score than an action film, and I mean that in really positive terms.

 

post #1144 of 1226

you should see the movie, michaelC

 

it's pretty good

post #1145 of 1226

I've been wanting to see it. Matter of time and energy. Likely seeing the MarsDamunn this weekend.

post #1146 of 1226

I would probably say that the scores for Sicario and The Walk are the best of the year so far, from what I've seen.  The latter is probably Silvestri's strongest effort in a while.  And yeah, Sicario's score is a fantastic piece of suspenseful composing.

 

Also, yesterday someone I know tried to argue that a good film score has to be minimalist and that if you notice it during the film/remember it, it's not a good film score.

 

Which... what?

post #1147 of 1226
post #1148 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

 

 

Also, yesterday someone I know tried to argue that a good film score has to be minimalist and that if you notice it during the film/remember it, it's not a good film score.

 

Which... what?

It's similar to the view some have of visual fx.  If it's not invisible, it's not totally successful.

 

The music, the sound, the vfx (etc) is not supposed to be the star.

post #1149 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

It's similar to the view some have of visual fx.  If it's not invisible, it's not totally successful.

 

The music, the sound, the vfx (etc) is not supposed to be the star.

Now, when it's argued that way I can understand that POV for sure (though there are certainly films where the music or the VFX are clearly one of the stars).  But the implied blanket dismissal of the great scores of Ennio Morricone, Bernard Hermann, Erich Korngold, Max Steiner, John Williams, Jerry Goldsmith, Maurice Jarre, etc. as not being up to "Composing 101" because they're not minimalist is a POV I find baffling.

 

There are definitely films where a more minimalist score is necessary.  You don't score, say, No Country for Old Men with the score for King Kong or Lawrence of Arabia.  At the same time, films can most certainly be overscored (see:  the upcoming Room with Brie Larson, a film which I very much loved for its writing and performances, but which the composer seems to sometimes treat as a biblical epic, especially in the final scene).  It's really just judging what's appropriate to the movie and the tone.

post #1150 of 1226

Score stuff I only just realized: you can damage a film by listening to its soundtrack too much. I've seen the film X:MEN FIRST CLASS only once. I really liked it but just haven't felt the need to watch it again. But it has a great score by Henry Jackman which I've listened since then weekly, especially when I'm working or driving. The other day FIRST CLASS was on the tele. And to my horror found the score very distracting. Because I know Jackman's score backwards and forwards, it felt like the film's temp track! Still a brilliant film, though. Guess I need to watch it a few times more to get that out of my system... 

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