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post #151 of 1226
The opening theme was co-written by Arnold, so he gets no blame relief for that.
post #152 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Christopher Young replaced Elfman on "Spider-Man 3" and I barely noticed.
That may have been (and I'm guessing here because I haven't seen the movie) because sound effects and everything else drowned out the score. I say that because I've heard several cues and IMHO it's brilliant. More robust and less maddeningly ornate than the Elfman scores. But I'm a huge Chris Young fan so that's biased.

Also, iTunes has become quite a respite for unreleased scores. Mychael Danna in particular has released a couple of gems there, including THE SNOW WALKER, the complete ICE STORM, and his score for Ang Lee's BMW Films movie CHOSEN.

But yeah, overall this year hasn't been great. Danna's score for BREACH was nice. Shire's ZODIAC score was low-key but fantastic.

Soundtrack.net has a First Listen of the new HARRY POTTER score. (Track title spoiler alert if you haven't read the book!) I can't bring myself to listen to it. I like to hear the score in the movie first.

There have been some great archival releases this year too. That seems to be the thing now: A lot of the new stuff sucks so release what older material you can.

THE DIRTY DOZEN (Frank De Vol) - FSM

THE LAST RUN (Goldsmith) - FSM

AMAZING STORIES, VOL. 3 (with John Williams' score to "The Mission" episode) - Intrada

RED DAWN (Poledouris - Remixed and Expanded) - Intrada

Great re-recording of THE PRIVATE LIFE OF SHERLOCK HOLMES (Rosza) - Intrada

I'm really looking forward to Nicholas Hooper's HARRY POTTER score, and it's always nice to see John Powell doing a BOURNE movie. Christopher Gunning's score for LA VIE EN ROSE is said to be stunning, which is surprising for a musical biopic. I read that he scores a key scene in the film and gets the end titles to himself. Can't wait to hear that one. And George Fenton's score for PLANET EARTH.

Okay, I've babbled long enough. Sorry guys.
post #153 of 1226
I really, really like John Ottman's Silver Surfer theme.
post #154 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
That may have been (and I'm guessing here because I haven't seen the movie) because sound effects and everything else drowned out the score. I say that because I've heard several cues and IMHO it's brilliant. More robust and less maddeningly ornate than the Elfman scores. But I'm a huge Chris Young fan so that's biased.
You may be right, I'd need to go back and listen to it on its own. Still, that's sort of the problem. I miss scores that grab you while you're watching. John Williams's music used to be almost a fully-realized character in the film. It's not a knock on the talent of current composers, but I just don't enjoy this background music trend.

Quote:
Also, iTunes has become quite a respite for unreleased scores. Mychael Danna in particular has released a couple of gems there
Wow, I've never seen that. I'll need to check those out. I really hope that he can get his "Hulk" score out there, but for some reason I bet the legal rangling would be a bit tougher than that of "The Ice Storm".
post #155 of 1226
Any chance we might get to hear Shore's Kong score one day?
post #156 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
You may be right, I'd need to go back and listen to it on its own. Still, that's sort of the problem. I miss scores that grab you while you're watching. John Williams's music used to be almost a fully-realized character in the film. It's not a knock on the talent of current composers, but I just don't enjoy this background music trend.
I get what you mean. To me it's all about the kind of movie. If it's a comic book adaptation, the music should be big. It's why I was disheartened to see Elfman was scoring HELLBOY 2. Which is ironic, because Elfman used to be a king of that "knock you back in your seat" kind of scoring.

One composer who's doing really well with the harmonically rich, thematic orchestral scores is Philippe Rombi. His scores for ANGEL, JOYEUX NOEL and LOVE ME IF YOU DARE are gorgeous. Too bad it's such a bitch finding that last one. It interpolates some Edith Piaf songs. Beautiful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Wow, I've never seen that. I'll need to check those out. I really hope that he can get his "Hulk" score out there, but for some reason I bet the legal rangling would be a bit tougher than that of "The Ice Storm".
Yeah, I wonder how the legalities work. As the industry goes increasingly more digital, let's hope that this stuff is able to see the light of day. I'd give my right nut to hear what Shore was able to record for KING KONG.
post #157 of 1226
You kiddin'? Though I loved Beltrami's main theme, Del Toro constantly had to push him to "go bigger". Apparently, Beltrami loves his music to remain blissfully in the background. At least Elfman doesn't have that problem (assuming he carries over Hellboy's theme).
post #158 of 1226
I have to second the Mansell love here.

The Fountain is a masterpiece. I love when a score actually become an integral part of the movie, and in this case, it became the 3rd main character, accompanying Tom and Izzy until the end and rebirth.
post #159 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
You kiddin'? Though I loved Beltrami's main theme, Del Toro constantly had to push him to "go bigger". Apparently, Beltrami loves his music to remain blissfully in the background. At least Elfman doesn't have that problem (assuming he carries over Hellboy's theme).
That's sort of the thing, because with a couple of exceptions (THE FAMILY MAN was gorgeous; SLEEPY HOLLOW had a great theme), Elfman has fancied himself a minimalist for about the last ten years. I wouldn't say he's content with writing musical wallpaper, but it's more like he decided to be a "serious" composer. It's like he used to build these big beautiful homes. Some had more furnishings on the inside than others, but they were all lush and full and gothic. Now it's like he gets caught up on designing some overly complex drainage systems, so the final product has a few walls here, a few doors there, but a lot of busywork going on underneath. Don't get me wrong; I still love him and think he's done great work (I'm an apologist for his PLANET OF THE APES score), but he's not the same composer he used to be. Depending on your tastes, that's either good or bad.

I'm a big fan of Beltrami though, and like GDT I wish he'd air it out a little more often.
post #160 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Banks, your love for Beltrami surprises me. I think he's a pretty vanilla composer who has managed to squander just about every plum genre assignment he's been given. I love his piece "Hellboy and Liz", but that's about it. He seems timid and safe, with his music always staying forgettably in the background. He can't bring himself to compose big thematic pieces even in huge genre outings like "Terminator 3". Mystifies me. Now he's doing "Live Free or Die Hard". Can't wait to hear how the music is, though I refuse to see the movie in theaters.
post #161 of 1226
Got your back there re: Die Hard, Stew. My Hellboy standouts are "Stand by your man" and "B.P.R.D." respectively.

Banks: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has wild and zany Elfman, a sensibility he will no doubt carry over to such an outing as Hellboy.
post #162 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Banks, your love for Beltrami surprises me. I think he's a pretty vanilla composer who has managed to squander just about every plum genre assignment he's been given. I love his piece "Hellboy and Liz", but that's about it. He seems timid and safe, with his music always staying forgettably in the background. He can't bring himself to compose big thematic pieces even in huge genre outings like "Terminator 3". Mystifies me. Now he's doing "Live Free or Die Hard". Can't wait to hear how the music is, though I refuse to see the movie in theaters.
I like Beltrami for a couple of reasons - He was an understudy of Jerry Goldsmith, probably my favorite composer, and so I gravitate toward some of the writing habits he developed working with Goldsmith (odd-meter rhythms, for example). I also get the sense that he's capable of more than what he's done, and in a way he's a victim of his (or, ahem, his agent's) choices, like working on so many horror movies early in his career, where the emphasis is on atmosphere and not necessarily something through-composed (although I like the first SCREAM score quite a bit). It's like something fed his willingness to go smaller in big moments, to get out of the way. But there's enough in each of his scores to suggest he's always working in the realm of the great but just, for whatever reason, hasn't quite gotten there yet. HELLBOY's theme was a step in the right direction. And he's done different genres. I enjoyed THE MINUS MAN, and I wish more of ANGEL EYES were available.

I don't disagree that much of what he's done is bland, I guess I just think he's ready for a breakout.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
Banks: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has wild and zany Elfman, a sensibility he will no doubt carry over to such an outing as Hellboy.
I don't know. When I think of HELLBOY and Elfman together, I tend to wish for something along the lines of BATMAN, not BEETLEJUICE. Looking at how his recent output might carry over to HELLBOY, I'd see HULK and the SPIDERMAN scores before I saw CHARLIE.

That said, Elfman's always been capable of rearing back and knocking out magnificent, rich, robust scores, so maybe, hopefully, GDT will be the one to convince him to go for broke (which apparently he couldn't do with Beltrami).
post #163 of 1226
Another great release to report from Intrada, particularly for any John Barry fans:

THE LAST VALLEY

Nic Raine and the sturdy but largely unspectacular Prague Philharmonic did a complete and faithful rerecording of the original LP a few years ago, but up til now the original Barry tracks have gone unreleased on CD. Though the rerecording was nice (though some Barry is hard to fuck up), the original tracks are noticeably superior, especially in how the choir interacts with the orchestra. In the rerecording the two were recorded separately, and the overdubbing lost the subtleties and nuance of the interplay between them in the original recording.

It's really classic early Barry: Strong themes (the "Valley" theme is especially gorgeous and worth the price of the CD alone), rhythmic action cues, and a vibrancy that just wasn't there after DANCES WITH WOLVES.

Highly, highly recommended.
post #164 of 1226
This week in limited releases:

Today was a banner day for film music geeks, with the announcement of the latest batch of Varese Sarabande's CD Club releases:

THE 'BURBS (Deluxe Edition) - Jerry Goldsmith - Limited Edition of 3000 copies.

This was one of the earliest VCL releases (back with Horner's VIBES and Poledouris's CHERRY 2000) and quickly became one of the rarest, most sought-after and expensive CDs on the secondary market. When I was running on-line auctions for soundtracks I saw this one go in the $200 range. For a CD with 30 minutes of music on it. This release doubles that amount of music (thank you, new union rules!). It's an acquired taste for sure, with Goldsmith doing the synthesizer tinkling that becamse so prevalent in his work in the 80's, but it's for a Joe Dante film, and Goldsmith always had fun with Dante. Despite its eccentricity, it still maintains Goldsmith's gift for warm and charming comedy (take a listen to "Square One (End Credits)." It's a fun listen.

F/X (Deluxe Edition) - Bill Conti - Limited Edition of 2000 copies.

Another reissue, this time of an early Varese LP. The last several VCL batches have included Conti scores (including a mammoth KARATE KID box set which is proudly among my recent purchases), and here we have a nice score from 1986. Of course Conti's famous for ROCKY and others, but he was steadily working on smaller projects throughout the years and there are gems to be found, including this score, SLOW DANCING IN THE BIG CITY, etc. His work in these films is often less derivative than his higher profile works. This isn't a groundbreaking score by any means, but it's a solid little suspense score. Fans of Chris Young will like the subtle jazz influence in the way Conti puts piano at the forefront.

LES MISERABLES - Alex North - Limited Edition of 1000 copies.

Probably the best score of the bunch, by a composer who's sorely underrepresented on CD, the late, great Alex North. As with all of the VCL releases limited to 1000 copies this one will go fast (as in, probably will sell out later today), so snap it up if the sample intrigue you in any way. It's hard to go wrong with North.

ANNE OF THE INDIES - Franz Waxman - Limited Edition of 1000 copies.

Big, swashbuckling pirate adventure score by another criminally underrepresented composer, Franz Waxman. It makes you wonder what POTC would've sounded like had Alan Silvestri not been fired.

CANNON FOR CORDOBA/FROM NOON TILL THREE - Elmer Bernstein - Limited Edition of 3000 copies.

Double bill from Elmer Bernstein. CORDOBA sees Bernstein doing the action mariachi thing, but the real find here is NOON, an offbeat film starring Charles Bronson. Bernstein's music is lyrical and child-like, not something you'd expect from a Bronson film.

(Side Note/Question: I'm really enjoying doing these posts, and with new limited releases rolling a few times a month, not to mention mainstream wide releases, this could turn into a pretty cool source for what's new in film music. Would anyone like to see more of this? Does anyone have specific requests for the kind of info they'd like to see?)
post #165 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Wow, pretty interesting. I'm so glad a lot of these scores are finally seeing the light of the day.

Is there anything recent this summer that we should keep an eye out for. Bay's films are usually good for a big, bombastic score. Steve Jablonsky seems to Bay's new go-to guy, hopefully it's a nice score. I liked Ottman's FF too.

Can someone who's heard it give a quick impression of Beltrami's DH score?
post #166 of 1226
Here's a question: of all the scores that have yet to see a decent release, what are the holy grails for you? I have a few:

Jerry Goldsmith's The Twilight Zone - The Movie. I can almost understand why the movie has been buried (though I wish it wasn't), but the score deserves a release. I had it on LP, believe it or not.

John Scott's Greystoke. An absolutely beautiful score that I last owned on cassette tape, and I no longer own a tape player. I miss it.

Alex North's Dragonslayer. To my knowledge, this has never, ever been released in any form. Criminal.
post #167 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
Jerry Goldsmith's The Twilight Zone - The Movie. I can almost understand why the movie has been buried (though I wish it wasn't), but the score deserves a release. I had it on LP, believe it or not.
You can get the CD for around $40. As far as I know it's an official release from Warner Bros. in Germany. The track list is the same as the LP. Certainly could use the deluxe treatment though, particularly with the new DVD release in October. Warner Bros. is unusually generous with their soundtrack licenses, so some kind of deluxe treatment should be possible (if they still own the rights, which I think they do).

Quote:
John Scott's Greystoke. An absolutely beautiful score that I last owned on cassette tape, and I no longer own a tape player. I miss it.
Great call. I love John Scott. His KING KONG LIVES is wonderful.

Quote:
Alex North's Dragonslayer. To my knowledge, this has never, ever been released in any form. Criminal.
It has been released, but it's nearly impossible to find on CD. It was released on the Australian label Southern Cross Records' SCSE limited series, in a pressing of 2000 copies (though 2750 are said to exist). It's the kind of release that still, despite the CD-R revolution, fetches over $100 on ebay.

As for my holy grails, I've been reallly lucky because several have been released in recent years: JOE VERSUS THE VOLCANO, VICTORY, GHOSTBUSTERS, THE KARATE KID... Despite the paucity of good new releases, there's never been a better time to be a film score fan in the digital age. But there's still stuff I'm waiting to be released or rereleased in proper form:

AIRPLANE! (Bernstein)
ALIEN (Goldsmith) - The long-rumored remastered and expanded release
MONSIGNOR (Williams) - Which has only legitimately been released on LP
THE GOONIES (Grusin)
GREMLINS (Goldsmith) - A decent release, not that wretched Geffen LP
THE MIGHTY DUCKS (David Newman) - Always had a soft spot for this
POINT BREAK (Isham) - If for no other reason than the main title and the skydiving sequence; my bootleg sounds like shit
JOURNEY OF NATTY GANN (Horner)

and last but certainly not least...

SANTA CLAUS: THE MOVIE (Henry Mancini) - I need something more than an LP transfer. This is a gorgeous score of the highest order.
post #168 of 1226
Thread Starter 
I can't think of a ton of scores I've wanted and found to be not available. I'd really like to hear some of the rejected scores though, most notably Mychael Danna's "Hulk".
post #169 of 1226
The one score I'm dying to hear and won't ever be able to is the score Goldsmith would have written for THE GAME OF THEIR LIVES, reuniting with David Anspaugh. It's sort of an urban legend that he wrote demos of themes which you can find on CDR if you look hard enough, but people "in the know" suggest he never recorded anything for it. I think he was too sick by then.
post #170 of 1226
I've only quickly breezed over this thread so forgive me if this is redundant.
Two underrated scores I've always been impressed with have been:

1. Elfman's debut on Pee Wee's Big Adventure.
2. Christopher Young's score to Hellraiser (which Elfman bit off for Batman).

Both are epic and totally fitting to their subject matter.
post #171 of 1226
I have always loved James Horner's Willow soundtrack.

I've never been able to find the sound track to Conan. Though, I have to admit, I really stopped trying about 15 years ago.
post #172 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
Here's a question: of all the scores that have yet to see a decent release, what are the holy grails for you? I have a few:

Jerry Goldsmith's The Twilight Zone - The Movie. I can almost understand why the movie has been buried (though I wish it wasn't), but the score deserves a release. I had it on LP, believe it or not.
I see bootleg CDs of this at conventions quite often. A really terrific score, no doubt. Can't seem to find it for sale anywhere but places like SuperCollector might carry the bootleg.

Quote:
John Scott's Greystoke. An absolutely beautiful score that I last owned on cassette tape, and I no longer own a tape player. I miss it.
http://www.monstersinmotion.com/cata...oducts_id/2107

Quote:
Alex North's Dragonslayer. To my knowledge, this has never, ever been released in any form. Criminal.
http://www.monstersinmotion.com/cata...oducts_id/9125

Who's your buddy?
post #173 of 1226
Howard Shore's score in THE DEPARTED. I especially like the track that plays through most of the first half of the film(I believe the songs are called "Colin" and "Cops and Criminals") which sound like some sort of Spanish guitar. I hum the shit out of that song.

Michael Giacchino's score for THE INCREDIBLES is amazing, and his MISSION IMPOSSIBLE III score was probably one of my favorite parts of the film.

And I rather like David Arnold's score in CASINO ROYALE. The music during the construction site chase is great.
post #174 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Hexum
Howard Shore's score in THE DEPARTED. I especially like the track that plays through most of the first half of the film(I believe the songs are called "Colin" and "Cops and Criminals") which sound like some sort of Spanish guitar. I hum the shit out of that song.

Michael Giacchino's score for THE INCREDIBLES is amazing, and his MISSION IMPOSSIBLE III score was probably one of my favorite parts of the film.

And I rather like David Arnold's score in CASINO ROYALE. The music during the construction site chase is great.
Yes, yes, and no. Shore has done some nice, almost thankless work for Scorsese's last few films. Loved his "Brooklyn Heights" tracks for "Gangs of New York".

And I really like Giacchino. His film work so far has been great, I'm a big fan of his "Mission:Impossible 3" score as well.

But I can't abide David Arnold. "Casino Royale" is better than his last 2 previous Bond scores, but that's not saying a lot. He still composes nondescript, Muzak-esque Bond scores.
post #175 of 1226
Watching the Bee movie trailer reminded me how good Michael Kamen's two Gilliam soundtracks are, particularly Brazil. He perfectly captures the mood and tone of that film with his music. Quite different from his Action Movie stuff. Looking at his body of work it's actually amazing how many of the Classic Action movie flicks he scored.
post #176 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litmus Configuration
I see bootleg CDs of this at conventions quite often. A really terrific score, no doubt. Can't seem to find it for sale anywhere but places like SuperCollector might carry the bootleg.

http://www.monstersinmotion.com/cata...oducts_id/2107

http://www.monstersinmotion.com/cata...oducts_id/9125

Who's your buddy?
Man, I've never seen that site before. There's some amazing stuff on there. Thanks for the link.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt OCallaghan
Watching the Bee movie trailer reminded me how good Michael Kamen's two Gilliam soundtracks are, particularly Brazil. He perfectly captures the mood and tone of that film with his music. Quite different from his Action Movie stuff. Looking at his body of work it's actually amazing how many of the Classic Action movie flicks he scored.
Interesting you should bring him up. I saw the Wall-E trailer tonight, and hearing that little snippet of Brazil made me remember how much I miss Michael Kamen.
post #177 of 1226
Thread Starter 
I don't think "The Departed" is a big, sweeping, orchestral score kind of movie. I thought Shore's score worked well, tying the existing songs Scorsese picked together. The Dropkick Murphys is a great theme for the movie,as was the Rolling Stones. And I have to admire the ear of Scorsese still being hip enough as an elderly Italian gent to put Nas into the movie.
post #178 of 1226
Big news (and I do mean big) in limited releases last week:

- At long last, La La Land Records has released the long-rumored 2-CD set of David Arnold's complete GODZILLA. It's a limited edition of 3000 copies. Usually a run of that size has a shelf life numbered in months (not hours, as any fan of Varese's 1000-copy releases can attest), but expect this one to go within weeks. It's a powerful, epic action score that's a lot of fun, and this coming from someone who's not the biggest Arnold fan in the world. The link has clips and ordering information.

- La La Land is also presenting the major retail release of the 25th anniversary edition of Trevor Jones' THE DARK CRYSTAL. Unfortunately this is not a repressing of La La's wonderful 2-disc set, which contained both a remastering of the original LP release and a second disc containing the entire score in film order. But it is a sterling presentation of the original LP release (identical to the first disc on La La's previous set). The score itself is typical of Jones - lush, engaging - but also features experimental instrumentation on top of its orchestral base. This was early in his career, and having just finished his schooling he was still finding the voice with which he's become so recognizable. In an abstract way I'd liken it to Horner's early efforts. You know, back when he gave a shit. Jones has become settled in his theme and variation approach in recent years (and he's been scoring some goofy projects), but here he puts the London Symphony Orchestra (which, again, Horner used early in his career) through its paces with energetic writing brimming with ideas. It's absolutely loaded with themes and motifs. Highly, highly recommended.

As a bonus, if you grab GODZILLA you can get CRYSTAL for only $10. Not too shabby.

Later this week Intrada is set to announce their latest limited release, which according to one of their bigwigs is a "unique marketing opportunity." I'm guessing that means something timed to be released with a DVD, so it could be Broughton's THE MONSTER SQUAD, but there are strong hints that it may be Goldsmith's MASADA.

Later, in August, Intrada will finally be announcing an expanded release of what they call a genuine classic (2-CD), but more intriguingly, one score fans have been asking for but were always told could never happen. Naturally, this has set the soundtrack nerd community scrambling. If there's anything we know well, it's holy grail wishlists being chopped up due to legal rights and uncooperative studios. But recently Intrada has managed to crack the Universal vaults, notably with the great AMAZING STORIES anthology releases, and Varese managed to release both GHOSTBUSTERS and THE KARATE KID, once thought to be impossible to release, being stationed at Sony/Columbia. Part of the reason is that music union rules are relaxing so that scores of a certain age are easier (read: cheaper) to license and release. Whatever the case may be, we know that this will be an expanded release of something thought to be forever gone. The smart money seems to be on Poledouris' CONAN THE BARBARIAN, Goldsmith's THE WIND AND THE LION (please!), or perhaps even that Goldsmith complete ALIEN everyone's been expecting.

Following the announcement on Thursday will be another announcement on Monday of its next Signature Edition and Special Collection titles. More to follow as soon as details become available.
post #179 of 1226
Big news (and I do mean big) in limited releases last week:

- At long last, La La Land Records has released the long-rumored 2-CD set of David Arnold's complete GODZILLA. It's a limited edition of 3000 copies. Usually a run of that size has a shelf life numbered in months (not hours, as any fan of Varese's 1000-copy releases can attest), but expect this one to go within weeks. It's a powerful, epic action score that's a lot of fun, and this coming from someone who's not the biggest Arnold fan in the world. The link has clips and ordering information.

- La La Land is also presenting the major retail release of the 25th anniversary edition of Trevor Jones' THE DARK CRYSTAL. Unfortunately this is not a repressing of La La's wonderful 2-disc set, which contained both a remastering of the original LP release and a second disc containing the entire score in film order. But it is a sterling presentation of the original LP release (identical to the first disc on La La's previous set). The score itself is typical of Jones - lush, engaging - but also features experimental instrumentation on top of its orchestral base. This was early in his career, and having just finished his schooling he was still finding the voice with which he's become so recognizable. In an abstract way I'd liken it to Horner's early efforts. You know, back when he gave a shit. Jones has become settled in his theme and variation approach in recent years (and he's been scoring some goofy projects), but here he puts the London Symphony Orchestra (which, again, Horner used early in his career) through its paces with energetic writing brimming with ideas. It's absolutely loaded with themes and motifs. Highly, highly recommended.

As a bonus, if you grab GODZILLA you can get CRYSTAL for only $10. Not too shabby.

Later this week Intrada is set to announce their latest limited release, which according to one of their bigwigs is a "unique marketing opportunity." I'm guessing that means something timed to be released with a DVD, so it could be Broughton's THE MONSTER SQUAD, but there are strong hints that it may be Goldsmith's MASADA.

Later, in August, Intrada will finally be announcing an expanded release of what they call a genuine classic (2-CD), but more intriguingly, one score fans have been asking for but were always told could never happen. Naturally, this has set the soundtrack nerd community scrambling. If there's anything we know well, it's holy grail wishlists being chopped up due to legal rights and uncooperative studios. But recently Intrada has managed to crack the Universal vaults, notably with the great AMAZING STORIES anthology releases, and Varese managed to release both GHOSTBUSTERS and THE KARATE KID, once thought to be impossible to release, being stationed at Sony/Columbia. Part of the reason is that music union rules are relaxing so that scores of a certain age are easier (read: cheaper) to license and release. Whatever the case may be, we know that this will be an expanded release of something thought to be forever gone. The smart money seems to be on Poledouris' CONAN THE BARBARIAN, Goldsmith's THE WIND AND THE LION (please!), or perhaps even that Goldsmith complete ALIEN everyone's been expecting.

Following the announcement on Thursday will be another announcement on Monday of its next Signature Edition and Special Collection titles. More to follow as soon as details become available.
post #180 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
Can't friggin' stand the score for The Departed, myself. There's this great opportunity to do an orchestral score for a modern Irish mob movie and they blow it with little tango pieces. Gaaaghaotethawwoh!
I'd have to respectfully disagree with you here. I LOVE the soundtrack, and the two songs I mentioned above("Cops and Criminals" and "Colin") give the film this great push that I think really adds to the sweeping pace of the film. I also like how the general riff changes throughout, getting more/less intense with what's going on.

And as Stew mentioned, I can't sit through THE DEPARTED without smiling when the Dropkick Murphys kicks in with the title at the 20 minute mark.

I'd like to also give some love to THE AVIATOR soundtrack, and it's perfect use of to tune "Nightmare".

And Stew; while I agree Arnold's score isn't amazing for CASINO ROYALE, the crane fight has this great musical cue, right when you get a wide shot of Bond and the dude hand-to-hand fighting on the crane, where the horns really start to blare, reminding me of the Bond I know and love.

WAAAy better than the music from DIE ANOTHER DAY(I swear Madonna's theme sounds like somebody just hit record and then beat their fists into a mixing board).
post #181 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
Can't friggin' stand the score for The Departed, myself. There's this great opportunity to do an orchestral score for a modern Irish mob movie and they blow it with little tango pieces. Gaaaghaotethawwoh!
I'd have to respectfully disagree with you here. I LOVE the soundtrack, and the two songs I mentioned above("Cops and Criminals" and "Colin") give the film this great push that I think really adds to the sweeping pace of the film. I also like how the general riff changes throughout, getting more/less intense with what's going on.

And as Stew mentioned, I can't sit through THE DEPARTED without smiling when the Dropkick Murphys kicks in with the title at the 20 minute mark.

I'd like to also give some love to THE AVIATOR soundtrack, and it's perfect use of to tune "Nightmare".

And Stew; while I agree Arnold's score isn't amazing for CASINO ROYALE, the crane fight has this great musical cue, right when you get a wide shot of Bond and the dude hand-to-hand fighting on the crane, where the horns really start to blare, reminding me of the Bond I know and love.

WAAAy better than the music from DIE ANOTHER DAY(I swear Madonna's theme sounds like somebody just hit record and then beat their fists into a mixing board).
post #182 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Hexum
I'd like to also give some love to THE AVIATOR soundtrack, and it's perfect use of to tune "Nightmare".
I just recently got this but haven't had the chance to listen to it yet. "Icarus" is an amazing cue though.
post #183 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Hexum
I'd like to also give some love to THE AVIATOR soundtrack, and it's perfect use of to tune "Nightmare".
I just recently got this but haven't had the chance to listen to it yet. "Icarus" is an amazing cue though.
post #184 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Later, in August, Intrada will finally be announcing an expanded release of what they call a genuine classic (2-CD), but more intriguingly, one score fans have been asking for but were always told could never happen. Naturally, this has set the soundtrack nerd community scrambling. If there's anything we know well, it's holy grail wishlists being chopped up due to legal rights and uncooperative studios. But recently Intrada has managed to crack the Universal vaults, notably with the great AMAZING STORIES anthology releases, and Varese managed to release both GHOSTBUSTERS and THE KARATE KID, once thought to be impossible to release, being stationed at Sony/Columbia. Part of the reason is that music union rules are relaxing so that scores of a certain age are easier (read: cheaper) to license and release. Whatever the case may be, we know that this will be an expanded release of something thought to be forever gone. The smart money seems to be on Poledouris' CONAN THE BARBARIAN, Goldsmith's THE WIND AND THE LION (please!), or perhaps even that Goldsmith complete ALIEN everyone's been expecting.
I keep hoping for expanded or complete scores for both TEMPLE OF DOOM and LAST CRUSADE. I have bootlegs of both complete scores but the sound quality varies from listenable to sucktacular. I imagine if there's ever a chance for these to come out, it will be next year.

I also keep hoping for decent soundtrack releases of Vangelis' THE BOUNTY, BITTER MOON and, of course, BLADE RUNNER. But I doubt that Greek madman will ever give the fans what they want.

I'm not sure I'd put the "smart money" on either CONAN or ALIEN. Two versions of CONAN, including a nicely expanded release, have been available over the years (I easily picked up both when each were first released.) And in addition to the original CD release of ALIEN, the 20th Anniversary DVD had an isolated music track that has been bootlegged out the ass (or chest, if you prefer) since then, so it's not that special of a find.

Thanks for the heads up, though. Looking forward to hearing what's eventually announced.
post #185 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Later, in August, Intrada will finally be announcing an expanded release of what they call a genuine classic (2-CD), but more intriguingly, one score fans have been asking for but were always told could never happen. Naturally, this has set the soundtrack nerd community scrambling. If there's anything we know well, it's holy grail wishlists being chopped up due to legal rights and uncooperative studios. But recently Intrada has managed to crack the Universal vaults, notably with the great AMAZING STORIES anthology releases, and Varese managed to release both GHOSTBUSTERS and THE KARATE KID, once thought to be impossible to release, being stationed at Sony/Columbia. Part of the reason is that music union rules are relaxing so that scores of a certain age are easier (read: cheaper) to license and release. Whatever the case may be, we know that this will be an expanded release of something thought to be forever gone. The smart money seems to be on Poledouris' CONAN THE BARBARIAN, Goldsmith's THE WIND AND THE LION (please!), or perhaps even that Goldsmith complete ALIEN everyone's been expecting.
I keep hoping for expanded or complete scores for both TEMPLE OF DOOM and LAST CRUSADE. I have bootlegs of both complete scores but the sound quality varies from listenable to sucktacular. I imagine if there's ever a chance for these to come out, it will be next year.

I also keep hoping for decent soundtrack releases of Vangelis' THE BOUNTY, BITTER MOON and, of course, BLADE RUNNER. But I doubt that Greek madman will ever give the fans what they want.

I'm not sure I'd put the "smart money" on either CONAN or ALIEN. Two versions of CONAN, including a nicely expanded release, have been available over the years (I easily picked up both when each were first released.) And in addition to the original CD release of ALIEN, the 20th Anniversary DVD had an isolated music track that has been bootlegged out the ass (or chest, if you prefer) since then, so it's not that special of a find.

Thanks for the heads up, though. Looking forward to hearing what's eventually announced.
post #186 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litmus Configuration
I also keep hoping for descent soundtrack releases of Vangelis' THE BOUNTY, BITTER MOON and, of course, BLADE RUNNER. But I doubt that Greek madman will ever give the fans what they want.
I don't know where the rights issues stand, but certainly with the big DVD set, a deluxe release of the soundtrack is intriguing.

Quote:
Two versions of CONAN, including a nicely expanded release, have been available over the years (I easily picked up both when each were first released.)
I have it too, but that Varese expanded release is now quite hard to find and fetching good money in the secondary market. More importantly, the sound quality left much to be desired. And Poledouris himself had more music he wanted to see released but couldn't because the stereo masters were damaged.

From Doug Fake at Intrada:

Just for info's sake, I've heard different things about CONAN. I know Basil's 1/4" two-track copy of the complete score did ultimately get damaged. Portions of it are perhaps what became available on the expanded Varese CD from a few years back because they were curiously identical to the same extra tracks Basil copied for me in a 1/4" format in his home studio back in 1985.

I've personally seen the care Universal currently takes with their vaults. I can't say they've always done this but right now they're paying close attention to it. What survives of the actual 2" 24-track recording session masters may not yet have been determined. I do know Basil stated the studio also made 1/2" 4-track mixdowns (LCR + Synch pulse) for possible Dolby presentations which ultimately didn't materialize.

In any case, I'm not sure I'd say this one's lost for good just yet.


Quote:
And in addition to the original CD release of ALIEN, the 20th Anniversary DVD had an isolated music track that has been bootlegged out the ass (or chest, if you prefer) since then, so it's not that special of a find.
True, but as you know soundtrack nerds are a special breed of collector. There's a market for such a release, and the specialty labels know it. Even if it's just a run of 3000, they'll do it, just to see it gets a proper release.

But of course, the actual releases will probably be nowhere near what the guesses have been. I can't wait to see what they are.
post #187 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Litmus Configuration
I also keep hoping for descent soundtrack releases of Vangelis' THE BOUNTY, BITTER MOON and, of course, BLADE RUNNER. But I doubt that Greek madman will ever give the fans what they want.
I don't know where the rights issues stand, but certainly with the big DVD set, a deluxe release of the soundtrack is intriguing.

Quote:
Two versions of CONAN, including a nicely expanded release, have been available over the years (I easily picked up both when each were first released.)
I have it too, but that Varese expanded release is now quite hard to find and fetching good money in the secondary market. More importantly, the sound quality left much to be desired. And Poledouris himself had more music he wanted to see released but couldn't because the stereo masters were damaged.

From Doug Fake at Intrada:

Just for info's sake, I've heard different things about CONAN. I know Basil's 1/4" two-track copy of the complete score did ultimately get damaged. Portions of it are perhaps what became available on the expanded Varese CD from a few years back because they were curiously identical to the same extra tracks Basil copied for me in a 1/4" format in his home studio back in 1985.

I've personally seen the care Universal currently takes with their vaults. I can't say they've always done this but right now they're paying close attention to it. What survives of the actual 2" 24-track recording session masters may not yet have been determined. I do know Basil stated the studio also made 1/2" 4-track mixdowns (LCR + Synch pulse) for possible Dolby presentations which ultimately didn't materialize.

In any case, I'm not sure I'd say this one's lost for good just yet.


Quote:
And in addition to the original CD release of ALIEN, the 20th Anniversary DVD had an isolated music track that has been bootlegged out the ass (or chest, if you prefer) since then, so it's not that special of a find.
True, but as you know soundtrack nerds are a special breed of collector. There's a market for such a release, and the specialty labels know it. Even if it's just a run of 3000, they'll do it, just to see it gets a proper release.

But of course, the actual releases will probably be nowhere near what the guesses have been. I can't wait to see what they are.
post #188 of 1226
Damn it, I've been waiting for a release of the Godzilla score since the movie came out, and they have to do it while my wife's unemployed and I can't buy anything.

They're trying to hurt me.
post #189 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Later this week Intrada is set to announce their latest limited release, which according to one of their bigwigs is a "unique marketing opportunity." I'm guessing that means something timed to be released with a DVD, so it could be Broughton's THE MONSTER SQUAD ...
And it is!!!!!!!! It's THE MONSTER SQUAD!

Hot damn!

One of Bruce Broughton's best, most entertaining scores finally sees the light of day. This release will be limited to 3000 copies. This is a seminal release, and I can't wait. Will ship in Sept/Oct.
post #190 of 1226
Thread Starter 
When is Steve Jablonsky's score for "Transformers" going to get a release? It's one of the first blockbuster scores I've really enjoyed in quite some time.
post #191 of 1226
I read on soundtrack.net that a score album is in production, but there's not a release date yet. I found a few tracks through the interwebs, so if you want 'em, feel free to shoot a PM mah way.
post #192 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
When is Steve Jablonsky's score for "Transformers" going to get a release? It's one of the first blockbuster scores I've really enjoyed in quite some time.
Like Tom said, it'll probably happen but no one knows when yet.

Unfortunately, Music from the Movies is reporting that what is not happening is a score release for Chris Young's wonderful SPIDERMAN 3. Considering the success of the film I'm surprised to hear this, but the story indicates that there were quite a few problems during the scoring of the film.
post #193 of 1226
The same kind of problems Elfman had on 2, or some other kind of problems?
post #194 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
The same kind of problems Elfman had on 2, or some other kind of problems?
Yeah, very similar. Other composers were brought in to write additional music, and some of Elfman's music was temped in (although I haven't seen the movie so I don't know where).
post #195 of 1226
Speaking of getting dicked around at the last minute, the ALIEN box set has a fascinating interview with Horner and Gale Anne Hurd about scoring ALIENS. It's a surprisingly honest look at how scoring these big budget films can get so fucked up by money and deadlines (and douchebags).

http://youtube.com/watch?v=lAciDfxBN7U
post #196 of 1226
Last night (or it could have been today because of Eastern Standard Time) Cinemagic on XM did a tribute to Jerry Goldsmith. It was great just listening to the wide array of movies he would score. It really is a shame that within the past few years we have lost the likes of Goldsmith, Kamen and Poledouris.
post #197 of 1226
That's too bad about the Spider-Man 3 score. I was looking forward to a clear version of the "Sandman Birth Scene" music.
post #198 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Okay, wasn't Elfman's beef that he was having bits of Christopher Young scores used in Spidey 2? Now Young's pissed because Raimi used portions of Elfman's score for Spidey 3? Interesting. I was giving Raimi some benefit of the doubt, but with two composers claiming to be screwed over, there's probably something to this.
post #199 of 1226
I think Elfman's main complaint was that he was being asked to plagiarize himself. Raimi had laid in cues from the first film as a temp track, and kept pressuring him to make the new cues more like the temps, essentially discouraging him from creating any new music. The Young bits were laid in after Elfman gave up.
post #200 of 1226
I think you're right, Greg. From what I know, I get the sense that Elfman had more of a direct clash with Raimi (and there was a falling out), whereas Young had more problems with the deadline and the producers.
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