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The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 5

post #201 of 1226
A couple friends of mine who've worked on all three SPIDEY flicks admitted to me that Raimi has increasingly become a supreme twat with the "great power" he continues to amass. Guess he doesn't put much stock in Peter Parker's most important life lesson.

I know there are two sides to every story but I'm fully in the pro-Elfman/Young camp on this one.
post #202 of 1226
This week's new limited releases from Intrada:

THE SEVEN-UPS (Don Ellis) / THE SEVEN-UPS (Johnny Mandel; rejected) / THE VERDICT (Johnny Mandel). Release is limited to 1200 copies. For me the highlight is the Ellis score. His work is not everyone's taste, but it's undeniably progressive, pushing the medium as far as any other composer in the 70's with its complicated fusion of jazz, funx, percussion and symphonic elements. It's wonderfully chaotic, but never random. Mandel's score for THE VERDICT is short but nice.

HERCULES (Pino Donaggio) - Limited to 1000 copies. I'm not familiar with this score but word in the nerd community is that this is a very welcome release from one of the more overlooked composers of the last 30 years.
post #203 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
When is Steve Jablonsky's score for "Transformers" going to get a release? It's one of the first blockbuster scores I've really enjoyed in quite some time.
I recommend you give his Steamboy score a listen. It's rousing, Indiana Jones-ish adventure stuff. I really enjoyed it. Here's the end credits: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NB5Z7LqamrA
post #204 of 1226
After listening to a few tracks, I can safely say that The Bourne Ultimatum's score does not disappoint.
post #205 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Magner
After listening to a few tracks, I can safely say that The Bourne Ultimatum's score does not disappoint.
This is great news. In what you've heard has Powell written any new material? I thought TBS was an improvement over TBI, but just because to me it was a more consistent score with better action cues. I imagine the two main motifs will stay the same (Bourne's theme and the propulsive "stalking" music), but I'd like to see something brand new.
post #206 of 1226
Yeah, The Bourne Ultimatum's score is great. And to make it even better, it caps off with a fantastic re-mix of Extreme Ways. Can't wait for next Friday.
post #207 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
This is great news. In what you've heard has Powell written any new material? I thought TBS was an improvement over TBI, but just because to me it was a more consistent score with better action cues. I imagine the two main motifs will stay the same (Bourne's theme and the propulsive "stalking" music), but I'd like to see something brand new.
There's a few new little motifs, but a lot of the action cues are recycled from TBS, not that I'm going to complain about that at all. My favorite tracks are probably "Tangiers" and "Waterloo", but the whole thing is pretty much fucking awesome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Clark
And to make it even better, it caps off with a fantastic re-mix of Extreme Ways.
Oh sofuckingawesome.
post #208 of 1226
I mentioned Patrick Doyle earlier, and sort of briefly mentioned his Goblet of Fire score, but with the film being on HBO almost 24/7, that score has really gotten to me, especially the "Harry In Winter" track.
post #209 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Patrick Doyle is so underrated. I think I actually read that certain fans disliked his "Potter" score (haven't heard it myself). I love his big, sweeping Branagh collaborations, but he was also fantastic with "Great Expectations".
post #210 of 1226
Doyle's got two really intriguing projects about to be released: Branagh's AS YOU LIKE IT and something called THE LAST LEGION, both out August 14.

AS YOU LIKE IT is Shakespeare of course, clearly one of Doyle's muses, and if the music from the score used in the trailer is any indication (couldn't find a decent link), it's something special.

No idea about LEGION, though it's described as a fantasy epic. I really dug ERAGON so that certainly sounds cool.
post #211 of 1226
Doyle's Frankenstein has become one of my favorite latter-day scores. When I first saw the film, I thought the music kind of overpowered the movie. On its own, though, it's a great listening experience. "The Creation" is now one of my favorite cues of all time.
post #212 of 1226
Thread Starter 
"The Last Legion" looks like a huge turd. You can find a trailer pretty easily, and it looks like a second cousin to a Uwe Boll movie.

I'm looking forward to "As You Like It", though I wish Branagh would get back to the meatier Shakespeare and quit with the B-level comedies like "Love's Labours Lost".

Completely agree with Greg on Doyle's "Frankenstein". "The Creation" is a great track. I thnk Doyle has managed to stay just as over-the-top as Branagh on most occasions. The music gets clolse to overpowering, but it's hard to overpower a movie as overblown and theatrical as Branagh's "Frankenstein", though I actually enjoy it quite a bit.
post #213 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Later, in August, Intrada will finally be announcing an expanded release of what they call a genuine classic (2-CD), but more intriguingly, one score fans have been asking for but were always told could never happen. Naturally, this has set the soundtrack nerd community scrambling. If there's anything we know well, it's holy grail wishlists being chopped up due to legal rights and uncooperative studios ... we know that this will be an expanded release of something thought to be forever gone. The smart money seems to be on ... Goldsmith's THE WIND AND THE LION (please!) ...
The soundtrack gods (here, Intrada and FSM) have answered! Oh Jesus glory be, they have answered.

Amazing news today from Intrada.

They're rereleasing THE WIND AND THE LION! What's more, they're giving it the most regal, deluxe treatment possible. On the first disc, Goldsmith's muscular score in chronological order, remastered from the original three-track masters. On the second disc, a redux of the original LP presentation, plus a smattering of source cues.

On a personal note, I've been after this score for years, since the original Intrada pressing went out of print. I've lost many an ebay auction in recent months. Now, I look upon that fondly. I've got exactly what I always wanted. Fucking glorious.

For anyone not familiar with the score, it's Goldsmith at his epic best, with a stately main theme and thunderous action music. It's highly, highly recommended.

I'm so fucking psyched for this.
post #214 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
(Side Note/Question: I'm really enjoying doing these posts, and with new limited releases rolling a few times a month, not to mention mainstream wide releases, this could turn into a pretty cool source for what's new in film music. Would anyone like to see more of this? Does anyone have specific requests for the kind of info they'd like to see?)
Yes, definitely, Banks! This should become a (semi) regular thing.
post #215 of 1226
I loved Doyle's GOBLET score, but Hooper's PHOENIX really is a disappointment.

And I could do without Young's SPIDEY 3 score. The Sandman Birth Scene was the only cue worth anything in the entire film.
post #216 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreeper
Yes, definitely, Banks! This should become a (semi) regular thing.
Banks, I second this. I'm enjoying you keeping us up with what's being released, especially because you obviously have a lot of enthusiasm for it. The film music sites update infrequently, and I don't know of all of them, so if you already keep up with it, I think this could be a good resource for people here. I myself am always interested in who has been hired to score which upcoming movies.

I wouldn't even mind seeing this thread stickied, seeing as how this is a good thread forum can sometimes become a receptacle for repetitive, crappy ones.
post #217 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Boom
I loved Doyle's GOBLET score, but Hooper's PHOENIX really is a disappointment.
Haven't heard PHOENIX but I agree about GOBLET. It seems to take a beating from the Williams fan base, but I thought it was a strong contribution, with a gorgeous new theme for Harry. Loved the action bits too.

Can't wait for Doyle's new scores next Tuesday.

Quote:
And I could do without Young's SPIDEY 3 score. The Sandman Birth Scene was the only cue worth anything in the entire film.
Young's score is really the only reason I'm interested in seeing the movie. I heard a bunch on a recent radio show and dug it quite a bit, but who knows how it plays in context.

I'm glad the summer movie season is finally nearing an end. It's been pretty crappy in terms of good scores.
post #218 of 1226
Stew and Kreeper, thanks guys! I'll do the best I can to keep up with new limited stuff, and try to post worthwhile news on upcoming composer assignments and release dates.
post #219 of 1226
I'm late, but I throw my support behind the idea as well. I don't keep up on score news the way I do movie news, and it's nice to hear this stuff.
post #220 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
I'm glad the summer movie season is finally nearing an end. It's been pretty crappy in terms of good scores.
I think you're right, and it's pretty sad. The only scores that realy grabbed me were "Transformers" and "The Bourne Ultimatum". Other than that, you had a ton of genre films and opportunities, and the music was just really nondescript.

Having said that, Powell's "Ultimatum" score was playing on my computer today, and I'm enjoying it quite a bit. He seems a bit more confident and comfortable in the world, and gets a little bigger than I remember him going in the previous films.
post #221 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Boom
I loved Doyle's GOBLET score, but Hooper's PHOENIX really is a disappointment.
I just saw the movie tonight, and I completely agree. The Phoenix score was far too full of whimsy and treacle for the saga in its current place. It might (accent on "might") have worked closer to the beginning, but it felt really out of place in the current context. They really should have brought Doyle back.
post #222 of 1226
New limited release from Intrada:

BILL & TED'S BOGUS JOURNEY (David Newman). Release is limited to 1500 copies.

Word from Intrada is that they tried to secure the score release rights to both films on one CD, but were unsuccessful to get clearance for EXCELLENT ADVENTURE. The good news is that the better of the two scores is getting the release, and it's a keeper. Newman works well to take the subject matter seriously, and the result is a surprisingly robust score for orchestra and choir. Not the kind of music you usually get for teen comedies from this age (though at the time, Elmer Bernstein might have served as an inspiration for any composers writing for comedies). If you didn't know the movie, you might think it was epic adventure. "Heaven" is a particular standout.
post #223 of 1226
My all time favorite score is from Legends of the Fall. Whenever I think of a gorgeous, sweeping piece of soundtrack music, I think of that.
post #224 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaNewYork
My all time favorite score is from Legends of the Fall. Whenever I think of a gorgeous, sweeping piece of soundtrack music, I think of that.
That's one of my favorites, too. I've been down on Horner for years now, but that's mainly because I know he's capable of producing such gorgeous film music. That period especially was a wonderfully fruitful period for him:

SNEAKERS
SEARCHING FOR BOBBY FISCHER
LEGENDS
APOLLO 13
BRAVEHEART
BALTO, ONCE UPON A FOREST and WE'RE BACK! (Don't laugh; the man does wonders for animated movies)
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER
THE MAN WITHOUT A BREATHALYZER, uh, I mean FACE
post #225 of 1226
The Rocketeer is pretty great, too. As we've mentioned before, he's gotten senile in his own age, as most of his scores sound very similar.

He's still better than Thomas Newman, though. He still insists that all of his scores include a liberal dose of FUCKING MARIMBA.
post #226 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minsky
He's still better than Thomas Newman, though. He still insists that all of his scores include a liberal dose of FUCKING MARIMBA.
Hey, whoa whoa whoa, let's not say things we can't take back.

I'll fully concede that Newman's "quirky" stuff has grown tired, but his more open, pastoral scores are still the goods. I just wish he'd do them more often. CINDERELLA MAN was nice, but I think ANGELS IN AMERICA was his last truly great score. Although the end credit piece from LITTLE CHILDREN is one of the single best things he's ever written.
post #227 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
That's one of my favorites, too. I've been down on Horner for years now, but that's mainly because I know he's capable of producing such gorgeous film music. That period especially was a wonderfully fruitful period for him:

SNEAKERS
SEARCHING FOR BOBBY FISCHER
LEGENDS
APOLLO 13
BRAVEHEART
BALTO, ONCE UPON A FOREST and WE'RE BACK! (Don't laugh; the man does wonders for animated movies)
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER
THE MAN WITHOUT A BREATHALYZER, uh, I mean FACE
Unfortunately... Horner hasn't had decent score in a while... he even copied his scores from Braveheart and Deep Impact into Bicentennial Man.
post #228 of 1226
I actually quite liked his Mask of Zorro score. The need to give the music a Spanish flavor made him leave his comfort zone and do some interesting work. There's a track called "The Ride" that's a perfect throwback to classic adventure films.
post #229 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
I actually quite liked his Mask of Zorro score. The need to give the music a Spanish flavor made him leave his comfort zone and do some interesting work. There's a track called "The Ride" that's a perfect throwback to classic adventure films.
I agree, Greg. Love that love theme too (although Will Jennings' lyrics for the big love song make me think he's actually a well-mannered chimpanzee). LEGEND OF ZORRO doesn't have the same punch, but "The Train" is worth the price of the album alone.

Every once in a while Horner comes up with something good (THE CHUMSCRUBBER really is a fine score, and THE FOUR FEATHERS is underrated), but he's too often the worst thing a composer can be: boring. His music's still as accessible and expansive, but it just meanders. Nevermind the constant plagiarism; I'm just not engaged by it.
post #230 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Hey, whoa whoa whoa, let's not say things we can't take back.

I'll fully concede that Newman's "quirky" stuff has grown tired, but his more open, pastoral scores are still the goods. I just wish he'd do them more often. CINDERELLA MAN was nice, but I think ANGELS IN AMERICA was his last truly great score. Although the end credit piece from LITTLE CHILDREN is one of the single best things he's ever written.
I haven't heard AMERICA or CHILDREN yet (although CHILDREN is sitting on my coffee table right now), but I'll give them a listen if you recommend them. Can I sue you if I hear a marimba?
post #231 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minsky
I haven't heard AMERICA or CHILDREN yet (although CHILDREN is sitting on my coffee table right now), but I'll give them a listen if you recommend them. Can I sue you if I hear a marimba?
I am neither representing nor warranting that you will not hear a marimba. Particularly with CHILDREN, which for much of its running time is "plink and plunk" style Newman. But that end credit piece is just gorgeous. ANGELS is more a of a full-bodied, big orchestra type effort.
post #232 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
...CHILDREN, which for much of its running time is "plink and plunk" style Newman.
"Plink and Plunk" is a great description. I wonder which instrument he played in the High School band? I'm guessing bassoon.
post #233 of 1226
The list of the instruments used on his albums always reads like a Mexican garage sale.
post #234 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
I actually quite liked his Mask of Zorro score. The need to give the music a Spanish flavor made him leave his comfort zone and do some interesting work. There's a track called "The Ride" that's a perfect throwback to classic adventure films.
This was the last time I was truly impressed by him. It pushed him a bit, and there are some downright gorgeous cues throughout that score. I love the flamenco-esque training montage. I love the whole movie - why oh why did "Legend of Zorro" have to suck sooooo bad?

There's a the little "impending doom" three note cue from this that he then recycled, almost verbatim, for "Troy".
post #235 of 1226
In his defense, I think they brought him in on Troy about four hours before it hit theaters. He probably didn't have time to do anything interesting, even if he were inclined to do so.
post #236 of 1226
As for his really recent output, any lovers of his Apocalypto? I bought it alongside The New World thinking the latter would be better and I'm still surprised Mel's movie score has gotten so much replay value. In fact, it's quite great for those nights after a stressful work day when you just wanna sit in the dark and listen to something in a New Age-y way.

In fact, I'm a true believer that Horner's scores are aces when he's composing for some nature-set movie: Mighty Joe Young, Legends of the Fall, Perfect Storm...
post #237 of 1226
For any John Powell fans around here, I'd recommend giving his score for PAYCHECK a chance. It's quite a fun and energetic techno thriller score that Woo's movie didn't deserve.

Though it's another Powell score for a movie that involves a hero suffering memory loss, it has a very different feel compared to his scores for the Bourne movies. He uses the strings for a nice romance theme.

The tracks, Hog Chase Part 1 and 2 are a lot of fun.
post #238 of 1226
Fuck. Yes. I still gotta spread my love around before jizzing you up all over again, Mac, but I too share the love for Powell's Paycheck. Somehow, I became addicted to that score for quite some time in the past and when I eventually rewatched the flick, I thought it had gotten better just by the soundtrack alone.

Which also leads me to recommend Graeme Revell's Aeon Flux as a good companion piece for it. Also fun, energetic, techno-ish... and IIRC for a movie about a hero(ine) with a memory loss problem.
post #239 of 1226
There's this one part of Hog Chase Part I, around 2:35, that's just so goddamned fun. It makes me want to start sprinting all of a sudden.

Actually, it kinda makes me want to watch the movie again even though I know I won't really be enjoying the movie.

There's another John Powell score I hear is really good. It was one for Agent Cody Banks (whaaaa?), but it was only released as a promo disc. Considering the energetic work Powell does for animated films with Harry Gregson Williams, I'd really like to find this one. I don't really want to have to watch the movie to hear it again though...
post #240 of 1226
You know, I've heard nothing but great things about PAYCHECK. I really have to check that score out (never saw the movie, and at the time I wasn't as big a Powell fan as I am now).
post #241 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
You know, I've heard nothing but great things about PAYCHECK. I really have to check that score out (never saw the movie, and at the time I wasn't as big a Powell fan as I am now).

Honestly, the score just grew on me when I listened to it by itself. It wasn't anything I particularly noticed while watching the film. It's weird. The film detracts from the score. The score thrives on its own and now may even make the film 'better'.

I would suggest just listening to it expecting something fun.
post #242 of 1226
I'll have to check that one out. I have a particular love of good scores for bad movies. Maybe it's the way that the music can just exist on its own, since I have no affection for the source material. Goldsmith's Supergirl is one of my all-time favorites.
post #243 of 1226
Pino Donaggio's work in Carrie makes my panties wet.
post #244 of 1226
That's not why your panties are wet.

Ironic that you chose that particular movie for that particular exclamation.
post #245 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
I'll have to check that one out. I have a particular love of good scores for bad movies. Maybe it's the way that the music can just exist on its own, since I have no affection for the source material. Goldsmith's Supergirl is one of my all-time favorites.

Speaking of awesome scores for bad movies... I used to listen to Zimmer's score for Broken Arrow ad nauseum. I can still replay the movie in my head listening to it. That one came out in 1996, a year after Zimmer found his over-done macho synth orchestra style with Crimson Tide. It's became a tired cliche already, but damn if I didn't think it was the greatest stuff next to Williams' work back then.

What helps Broken Arrow last is Zimmer's work with Duane Eddy for Travolta's bad guy theme. Hey, it was awesome enough to use again in Scream 2 for David Arquette!

Speaking of Jerry Goldsmith, I've always loved his score for LA Confidential. I know most of the movie is scored by period songs, but Goldsmith's work just blends so seamlessly with them. It never feels like songs or score. It's all one thing.
post #246 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
That's not why your panties are wet.

Ironic that you chose that particular movie for that particular exclamation.

I figured he was choosing his words carefully.

Pino Donaggio also scored De Palma's BLOW OUT, right? His work feels like Morricone, and I mean that as a compliment.
post #247 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82
Speaking of Jerry Goldsmith, I've always loved his score for LA Confidential. I know most of the movie is scored by period songs, but Goldsmith's work just blends so seamlessly with them. It never feels like songs or score. It's all one thing.
"Bloody Christmas" is bloody brilliant.

If you like LAC, you'll like Leonard Bernstein's ON THE WATERFRONT. Goldsmith basically cribbed Bernstein's main theme for LAC.
post #248 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
"Bloody Christmas" is bloody brilliant.

If you like LAC, you'll like Leonard Bernstein's ON THE WATERFRONT. Goldsmith basically cribbed Bernstein's main theme for LAC.

"This is for ours, poncho!"

Thanks for the recommendation.

To bring up John Powell again, does anyone else have any love for his UNITED 93 score? There's one that probably wouldn't have so much impact if not for the context, but damn if Powell doesn't run with it. The second to last track, "The End" gets my heart pumping and my eyes wet. Goosebumps all over.
post #249 of 1226
I think you'll find no surprises here, since it is my understandind the U93 score is universally loved around these parts. Personally, the first time I saw the movie the initial cues for "Prayers" already gave me those goosebumps.

But to keep on with the Good Scores for Bad movies (or in this case, Gitmo's finest), someone else should try Mark Isham's Next. Sweet, energetic and quite playful. As like everything else in that, it was mercifully butchered in the flick, but it was the sole thing that kept my ass screwed to the seat during its sepukku-inducing running time.
post #250 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsycheOut00
I think you'll find no surprises here, since it is my understandind the U93 score is universally loved around these parts. Personally, the first time I saw the movie the initial cues for "Prayers" already gave me those goosebumps.

But to keep on with the Good Scores for Bad movies (or in this case, Gitmo's finest), someone else should try Mark Isham's Next. Sweet, energetic and quite playful. As like everything else in that, it was mercifully butchered in the flick, but it was the sole thing that kept my ass screwed to the seat during its sepukku-inducing running time.
Ah. I know the love people have for the film around these parts, but I rarely hear mention of Powell's score. I also made sure to search this thread for any mention of it before I mouthed off. I wasn't sure, because it was such a generally understated work that I wasn't sure if people enjoyed it on its own.

Sorry to bring up Powell again (I've been a fan since his Face/Off debut), but X3 was another one of his good scores for a movie that didn't deserve it. Way too epic for a movie so stunted. Had a great Phoenix theme that was more suited to a biblical epic. A bit overdone, but very good.

Anyone else visit www.filmtracks.com? I don't frequent it nearly as much as I used to, but it's a pretty good site for score reviews.
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