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The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 6

post #251 of 1226
I think I've damn-near worn out my Untouchables soundtrack (especially Track 1!)
post #252 of 1226
UNITED 93 is a score I actually do care about seeing in context, so I need to finally sit down and watch one of its 37 HBO airings a day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82
Anyone else visit www.filmtracks.com? I don't frequent it nearly as much as I used to, but it's a pretty good site for score reviews.
Absolutely. Over the years I've become friends with Christian, the editor. The thing about that site, and Christian would admit this, is that it's geared toward casual fans. It's built to generate revenue. So the reviews are structured as a buying guide of sorts for people who wander in from google searches, and his reviewing style is fairly broad. That's not a critique, just an observation. I have a couple of reviews over there myself, actually (HEAT, LITTLE WOMEN).

My favorite film music site for reviews is Movie Wave. Movie Music UK is another good one, although it doesn't get updated often enough.
post #253 of 1226
John Carpenter is much less expensive than any of these people, and his more minimalist scores are excellent. His stuff only goes bad when the button on his keyboard gets stuck on 'Bossanova' or he lets his band sing like at the end of 'Big Trouble in Little China'.
post #254 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Let it never be said that I can't give cerdit where credit is due. After raking the man over the coals through most of this thread, I have to give a big thumbs up to Marco Beltrami and his "3:10 to Yuma" score.

I was really liking the music. I remember thinking for second that it sounded a bit like "Hellboy and Liz" (a favorite track) from "Hellboy", but I quickly dismissed the thought. Then the score got even better, with a great finale, and I'm thinking, "How could I not know that a great composer was doing this movie?"

Well, color me shocked during the credits. I liked it. A lot.
post #255 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
I was really liking the music. I remember thinking for second that it sounded a bit like "Hellboy and Liz" (a favorite track) from "Hellboy", but I quickly dismissed the thought. Then the score got even better, with a great finale, and I'm thinking, "How could I not know that a great composer was doing this movie?"
This is great news. I feel like I always expect great things from Beltrami, and often he fails to deliver, but the YUMA score has been getting a lot of good buzz. Can't wait to hear it.


Switching gears (yuk yuk), there's a rumor floating around that Ramin Djawadi had gotten the primo assignment of scoring IRON MAN for Jon Favreau. I'm hoping this is as thin as it sounds, because I'd like to see the job go to John Debney or Ed Shearmur. Or maybe, in light of this thread, someone like John Powell, who could jazz up the picture was his signature blend of percussion and orchestration. He could come up with a killer clanging main theme for the character.
post #256 of 1226
Here's a fascinating documentary done by the BBC in 1980 about Williams scoring EMPIRE:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
post #257 of 1226
Glad to hear about Beltrami. "Stand by Your Man" was a favourite of mine on Hellboy.

On the "good scores for bad movies" side of things: Dinosaur has a pretty good Newton Howard score and Tarzan was well done by Mark Mancina.

Yeah, I babysitted for a few days.
post #258 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
Glad to hear about Beltrami. "Stand by Your Man" was a favourite of mine on Hellboy.

On the "good scores for bad movies" side of things: Dinosaur has a pretty good Newton Howard score and Tarzan was well done by Mark Mancina.

Yeah, I babysitted for a few days.

Is Tarzan considered a bad movie? I always thought it was a modestly good movie. I loved it back when it came out. There's a lot of great stuff going on in that movie. I don't hold it up quite so high anymore, but I never thought it was bad.
post #259 of 1226
I guess it depends on how much you care about the character. As a lifelong Tarzan fan, I hated it. I've waited all my life for a real Tarzan movie, which still has yet to be made. He's one of the most filmed characters in movie history, and nobody's gotten it right.
post #260 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
I guess it depends on how much you care about the character. As a lifelong Tarzan fan, I hated it. I've waited all my life for a real Tarzan movie, which still has yet to be made. He's one of the most filmed characters in movie history, and nobody's gotten it right.
What would make your ideal Tarzan movie?
post #261 of 1226
I'm guessing lost cities and leopard men? Disney's Tarzan is quite alright as far as recent Disney movies go, but I can definitely see why Greg wouldn't like it.
post #262 of 1226
I am aware of the fact that the movie lost a lot of energy the moment the civilized humans entered the story halfway through. Felt like a total buzzkill after the awesome cheetah fight. I haven't seen it for a while. I wonder if that Deep Canvas stuff where Tarzan surfs through the jungle holds up well. I recall thinking that it did the last time I saw it.

Getting back to composers... Mark Mancina's involvement with the movie is what actually made me think of Tarzan as "The Disney Action Flick". He was involved in the CON AIR score and both movies feature the villain punching the superhero in a wound. Flimsy connection, I know...
post #263 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
I'm guessing lost cities and leopard men? Disney's Tarzan is quite alright as far as recent Disney movies go, but I can definitely see why Greg wouldn't like it.
Pretty much, yes. I'd just like to see the inclusion of some of the more fantastic elements in the original novels. It was a huge part of the mythos that everyone who makes movies insists on ignoring.
post #264 of 1226
People who know Tarzan from the Weissmuller films will pretty much only associate him with evil great white hunters, friendly jungle animals and perhaps the occasional evil witch doctor or mad scientist. I can see why Hollywood would think they needn't spend money on something more complicated than that, as long as the audience doesn't really expect it. I haven't seen it myself, but apparently the Tarzan TV series based on the film ventures into the wackier parts of the mythos.
post #265 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
On the "good scores for bad movies" side of things: Dinosaur has a pretty good Newton Howard score and Tarzan was well done by Mark Mancina.
Bit of personal trivia: on my past summer vacation I've spent ten days listening to the (excellent) Dinosaur soundtrack while working on my Tarzan fan script. BTW, anyone got a spare $100Mil. or at least, the right contacts?

And no, none of both movies could be considered bad. While initially considered "mediocre", I was blown away by Dinosaur and still hold it as a very good-to-great entry in the western genre, and Tarzan's first five-minutes (including, yes, Mancina's score and Phil Collins song) tear me up like a baby bitch. On the grand scheme of things I know full well what their place is, but to me they will probably remain as the last Disney greats I enjoyed in a movie theater before Pixar finished redefining the term "Disney Classics".
post #266 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luca S.
People who know Tarzan from the Weissmuller films will pretty much only associate him with evil great white hunters, friendly jungle animals and perhaps the occasional evil witch doctor or mad scientist. I can see why Hollywood would think they needn't spend money on something more complicated than that, as long as the audience doesn't really expect it. I haven't seen it myself, but apparently the Tarzan TV series based on the film ventures into the wackier parts of the mythos.
If people can buy into the Mummy movies, they can certainly buy into the pulpier aspects of Tarzan.

Speaking of "good scores for bad films" and Jerry Goldsmith, I love his theme for Supergirl. So deserved to be in a better film.
post #267 of 1226
Another new Intrada Special Collection release, yet another David Newman score:

THROW MOMMA FROM THE TRAIN (David Newman). Limited to 1500 copies.

I have no idea what this score sounds like, although it's described as "Bernard Herrmann-ish" in places. Newman's a good composer, but he's so often been saddled keep it close to the temp track that I wonder if it's truly reminiscent of Herrmann, or just apes him.
post #268 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Not sure if it would ever be available, but I finally saw Al Pacino's "Chinese Coffee" about a month ago (only recently released on DVD), and I was taken back by the beautiful little Elmer Bernstein score. It's a very little movie, but I found myself constantly wondering who did the score. Pretty impressive to snag a very understated Bernstein for such a tiny project.
post #269 of 1226
Don Ellis' score for the French Connection is amazing. Blows my mind.
post #270 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Ripoll
Don Ellis' score for the French Connection is amazing. Blows my mind.
Hell yes, Pat. One of the best progressive jazz scores ever written for a film.

If you liked that one, you should definitely try David Shire's brilliant score for THE TAKING OF PELHAM 123, a funky, progressive, beautifully constructed piece of music.
post #271 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Ripoll
Don Ellis' score for the French Connection is amazing. Blows my mind.
Yes. I love the three note bass number that plays, especially during scenes where they're tailing the Frenchman on foot. It just roars out of nowhere. "Whump....whump. whump." Since I know it would interest Ripoll, I've always wondered whether some innovative hip hop producer would eventually sample that bass portion, loop it, and have a really cool beat on their hands.
post #272 of 1226
Probably because I'm listening to it now, but I really like Mychael Danna's score for Shattered Glass. It helps that I liked the movie a lot. It also helps that the score was perfect for putting a reel of clips together for myself. Some of it is a little too reminiscent of Thomas Newman's work, but I still dig this score.
post #273 of 1226
Danna's a really exciting composer. HEARTS IN ATLANTIS and ANTWONE FISHER are two of my favorites of his.
post #274 of 1226
HUGE news in special limited editions for John Williams fans, courtesy of Intrada:

MONSIGNOR (Williams). Limited to 3000 copies, and these are likely to go fast, as archival Williams scores most often do. FSM's releases of THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE and THE TOWERING INFERNO went quickly and are now extraordinarily expensive on the secondary market. Of special note to collectors is the fact that this is the *only* Williams score not to get a CD release after 1977. The film came and went in 1982, as did the soundtrack on vinyl, where it remained for 25 years.

MONSIGNOR is a heavy, dramatic score prefacing the kind of somber-string heavy material Williams perfected in JFK, NIXON, MUNICH, etc. I'll let the folks at Intrada explain the rest because I'm otherwise unfamiliar with the score and the film.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Intrada
In the early 1980s, John Williams composed the scores to one blockbuster after another (the STAR WARS sequels, E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL, the INDIANA JONES series), not to mention carving out time as director of the Boston Pops. But if that wasn't enough, Williams was able to squeeze in a more serious drama, "... in which Christopher Reeve doesn't play Superman," to quote Williams, the 1982 20th Century Fox film MONSIGNOR. Williams' score remains one of the most memorable elements of a minor film starring Reeve as John Flaherty, an ordained priest who, once summoned to Rome and assigned to the position of Cardinal within the Vatican, becomes involved with black marketeers and has an illicit romance with a nun.

MONSIGNOR remains the one post-STAR WARS Williams' score yet to be released on CD, until now. Intrada's release features the score remastered from the original elements, presenting the music as heard in Williams' original, perfect LP presentation. Astute listeners may detect a scant three minutes of music in the film that is not on the album, but the album presents more than 10 minutes of stunning music not heard in the film. The album-only material includes "The Meeting in Sicily," the genesis of Williams' work on his Esplanade Overture. This florid musical piece appears briefly in MONSIGNOR the movie, was further developed for inclusion on the MONSIGNOR LP, and was eventually revised and finalized, premiering as the Esplanade Overture with the Boston Pops. Another high point of the score heard in the film is "Gloria," a set piece featuring 500 costumed extras in Rome's Cathedral of St. John and Paul -- a five-minute musical sequence with no dialog or sound. The main theme itself is a haunting melody, first heard for solo trumpet, performed by long-time Williams collaborator Maurice Murphy.
post #275 of 1226
Fascinating thread. I'll have to drop in more often. I haven't bought as many scores as I used to, but I've got a fair bit.

Still rather miffed that I missed out on Ghostbusters and Donaggio's Hercules (granted, haven't seen the movie since I was a kid, but what I heard on the Intrada site was pretty good).

I'd pick up that Dragonslayer CD Greg linked to, but I'm iffy on dropping $20 on a CD-R.

Eagerly awaiting another Indy score from Williams, as well.
post #276 of 1226
You know, I've read two pages worth of this thread and it just seems insaely unjust that Ennio Morricone's score for The Mission has yet to be mentioned. That's one of the best film scores of the last thirty years and the score is pretty much the star of the film.

After that one, Prokofiev's score for Alexander Nevsky is pretty awesome.

Also, for Fiddler on the Roof, Star Wars: Episode IV-A New Hope, and Jurassic Park alone, I think Williams could coast for the rest of his life.
post #277 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
That's one of my favorites, too. I've been down on Horner for years now, but that's mainly because I know he's capable of producing such gorgeous film music. That period especially was a wonderfully fruitful period for him:

SNEAKERS
SEARCHING FOR BOBBY FISCHER
LEGENDS
APOLLO 13
BRAVEHEART
BALTO, ONCE UPON A FOREST and WE'RE BACK! (Don't laugh; the man does wonders for animated movies)
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER
THE MAN WITHOUT A BREATHALYZER, uh, I mean FACE
I'm hard on Horner too but he was robbed of an Oscar in 1996 because the Acaemy was feeling snobbish and voted for IL POSTINO. Horner should've won for either APOLLO 13 or BRAVEHEART but I think they were punishing him for being too good that year. I've never heard the POSTINO score out side the film but BRAVEHEART is in my Top 10.

On a sidenote, when POSTINO's director, Michael Radford, came to speak to my film class, he actually agreed.
post #278 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
Goldsmith's Supergirl is one of my all-time favorites.
Good pick, Greg.

I thought the film was so bad that I'd totally blanked out anything associated with it. Man, I'll always regret never picking up the expanded (2 disc?) version when I saw it in stores.

It wasn't until a friend of mine played me the score years later that I realized how great it is. Upon hearing the first few cues my mmediate thought was "Holy sh*t it's John Williams by way of Jerry Goldsmith!"
post #279 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuchulain
You know, I've read two pages worth of this thread and it just seems insaely unjust that Ennio Morricone's score for The Mission has yet to be mentioned. That's one of the best film scores of the last thirty years and the score is pretty much the star of the film.
We're just like the Academy; we completely ignore Morricone around here.

No, actually he's all over this thread. If this one interests you in the least, that one should knock your socks off. Good stuff.

Quote:
After that one, Prokofiev's score for Alexander Nevsky is pretty awesome.
Can't argue with that. "The Battle on the Ice" is one of the most amazing cues ever written.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreeper
I'm hard on Horner too but he was robbed of an Oscar in 1996 because the Acaemy was feeling snobbish and voted for IL POSTINO. Horner should've won for either APOLLO 13 or BRAVEHEART but I think they were punishing him for being too good that year.
I agree; BRAVEHEART was totally worthy. (Even though "For the Love of a Princess" is a hilariously misguided track title.) "The Battle of Stirling" is one of the best single things he's written. Unfortunately he had two things working against him that year: Two scores nominated, which means they split votes (this is how SHAWSHANK got royally fucked because Newman's LITTLE WOMEN was also nominated that year), and IL POSTINO was a classic "pity" vote in the score category. We can't give any "substantial" awards, so let's give it best score! Yay! Viva Le Resistance!
post #280 of 1226
John Williams is my fave composer. I look forward to his upcoming score from Indiana Jones and the Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull.

Michael Giacchino is another favorite composer. With a resume that includes Alias,The Incredibles, and now J.J. Abrams Star Trek, his record should him over at least some of his contemporaries.
post #281 of 1226
I also enjoyed Star Trek II, The Rocketeer, and The Mask Of Zorro scores, all by James Horner.
post #282 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuchulain
You know, I've read two pages worth of this thread and it just seems insaely unjust that Ennio Morricone's score for The Mission has yet to be mentioned. That's one of the best film scores of the last thirty years and the score is pretty much the star of the film.

Dammit! I was thinking the same thing! The Main Theme alone is worth the price of admission.
post #283 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
Can't argue with that. "The Battle on the Ice" is one of the most amazing cues ever written.[/I]
Yes it is. I was fortuante enough to experience Masur conduct the San Francisco Symphony's performance of the entire score last week. That was a good night.
post #284 of 1226
Clint Mansell's Fountain score won a couple of awards at the World Soundtrack Awards (never heard of it, but good for him). He posted this bulletin on myspace:

Quote:
So to the awards! Well,if you've stuck with me this far - all I can say is thank you so much!! I know some of you wrote to me after the WSAs were announced to say that you had voted fro me in the Public Choice category - well,I won it!! Public Choice Award at the 2007 World Soundtrack Awards goes to Clint Mansell for 'The Fountain'! I couldn't believe it, so thank you all so much for voting for me. It is greatly appreciated!! Thank you! But things got better, if that is possible!! Because I also won Best Original Score! So I came home with two awards!! I was ill-prepared for one speech, let alone two!! But after some mumbling I managed to get some words out! My award was presented to me by film score legend Maurice Jarre and you can see a not so great picture of me getting my award here....http://www.worldsoundtrackawards.be/...o=detail&id=64 I had a great time in Ghent, I want to thank all of you who voted for me and the wonderful hosts who treated us so well! I can't wait to go next year!! Thanks a million! Best wishes, Clint.
post #285 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Happenin
Dammit! I was thinking the same thing! The Main Theme alone is worth the price of admission.
All I've heard is the cue titled 'On Earth As It Is In Heaven' on the soundtrack CD (which is probably the main title). It's gorgeous.

And I see that there's a copy of the CD at my local library (also put Nevsky on hold as well). Off I go...
post #286 of 1226
I really am starting to adore the work Yeong-wook Jo, he did the soundtrack for Park Chan-wook's Vengeance Trilogy. I'm finding myself listening to his work on Oldboy and Lady Vengeance more and more whilst I'm out and about. There is this real, regal melancholy about the music which just illustrates the films of the movies so well. Usually I dislike overstated composers, I'm not a fan of John Williams because I think he forces emotion to much, but Jo's large and grand melodies really strike me.

Pieces like The Last Waltz and Cries and Whispers really define what Oldboy is all about and are just beautiful, beautiful pieces of music to boot.
post #287 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82
Probably because I'm listening to it now, but I really like Mychael Danna's score for Shattered Glass. It helps that I liked the movie a lot. It also helps that the score was perfect for putting a reel of clips together for myself. Some of it is a little too reminiscent of Thomas Newman's work, but I still dig this score.
Speaking of which, any love on his Fracture score as well? Personally, I've been on a bit of a roll with the movie lately -read the script last week, watched the flick this weekend, got my hands on the soundtrack last friday- and thought it was quite the goods. Not so much as to save an otherwise OK movie, but it sure elevated it big time.

Definitely, what his 8mm score should have been.
post #288 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuchulain
Yes it is. I was fortuante enough to experience Masur conduct the San Francisco Symphony's performance of the entire score last week. That was a good night.
After reading the above I tracked down a copy of this score and I have to agree, the track is great fun. I'm curious how much, if any, inspiration it provided for some of Shore's work in the LOTR films (Mt. Doom motifs and some of the battles) or for Williams during the Prequels (Duel of the Fates and the duel in Episode III).
post #289 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike Marshall
I really am starting to adore the work Yeong-wook Jo, he did the soundtrack for Park Chan-wook's Vengeance Trilogy. I'm finding myself listening to his work on Oldboy and Lady Vengeance more and more whilst I'm out and about. There is this real, regal melancholy about the music which just illustrates the films of the movies so well. Usually I dislike overstated composers, I'm not a fan of John Williams because I think he forces emotion to much, but Jo's large and grand melodies really strike me.

Pieces like The Last Waltz and Cries and Whispers really define what Oldboy is all about and are just beautiful, beautiful pieces of music to boot.

I've actually never understood Williams' detractor's claim that he forces the emotions. But I agree with you on the work of Jo Yeong-Wook. What I love about his scores for those two Park Chan-Wook films is that it sounds like they're using pre-existing music. It just sounds so familiar and so right. But you know it's original (at least you hope so).

But this type of scoring could get really old very fast. I watched A Bittersweet Life a while ago and wasn't terribly impressed with it. Nor was I impressed when I heard the score going for that baroque feeling. Now they're just trying to be cool!!!
post #290 of 1226
New from Intrada:

HARRY AND THE HENDERSONS (Bruce Broughton) Limited to 3000 copies.

This was previously issued on vinyl and cassette by MCA Records, and therefore represents yet another leg up for soundtrack nerds in getting access to once-thought impenetrable vaults like Universal. (And Columbia earlier in the year, with KARATE KID and GHOSTBUSTERS). Paramount's still a pain in the ass, but there's more available now than ever thought possible even two, three years ago. Amazing.

This is a nice release of a pleasant Broughton score. The film is from 1987, back when Broughton was a rising name (after SILVERADO and YOUNG SHERLOCK HOLMES) and still working on A-list projects. It's a pretty good score with a warm main theme and even some action material. A large portion of what's on this release either didn't appear on the original soundtrack or wasn't in the film. Director William Dear didn't want a lot of music and took the knife to it. So this CD represents the score as Broughton originally envisioned.
post #291 of 1226
Clint Mansell has posted some of his temporary work from The Fountain on myspace.

Quote:
Hi, I've been hunting through my backpages recently, for one reason or another, and I came upon some early demos and ideas from The Fountain. I thought you might like to check out how these pieces started out compared to how they ended up sounding in the film. A couple of them were used as the screensavers from The Fountain website.

I've posted them over at my other mySpace page...

www.myspace.com/themusicofclintmansell

Also there is the music from the trailer for The Fountain which a number of people had written in and requested,so...y'know...check 'em out!

Hope alls well with everyone

Best wishes

Clint.
Pretty cool, especially since nothing other than 'Snow' sounds like anything that really made it into the film...
post #292 of 1226
Wow, this thread got almost completely gutted. Shame, too.

After hearing Michael Giacchino's Cloverfield Overture, I want that on CD badly. I haven't grinned so stupidly after a movie in a long time. My best friend/roommate in college was a Godzilla freak, and he would go BANANAS if he heard this in a theater.
post #293 of 1226
Some great (unofficial-yet-official) news out of FSM:

A couple of years ago FSM released what has come to be known as the "Red Box," a staggering collection of Elmer Bernstein albums and re-recordings, most of which had yet to see a CD release. Since then that set's release there have been rumblings about FSM's next big box project, which through an infamous but you-had-to-be-there funny story came to be known as the "Blue Box." Speculation ran rampant. Word was that it not only involved a high-profile composer but had mainstram appeal, much like Intrada's recent ALIEN release. Naturally, this send the film music nerd community into overdrive, and message board threads with literally thousands of posts poured forth, equal parts rumor and guesstimate.

We finally know what it is. No official announcement has been made, but FSM was very clear about it:

All four Christopher Reeve SUPERMAN scores, remastered, spread over 8 CDs. The set will also contain a 160-page book. The set will retail for $120 (not available yet for ordering).

The first film obviously was scored by Williams, and Rhino's wonderful 2-CD release has been out of print for sometime. For Parts II and III, Ken Thorne was adapting Williams' music (moreso for Part II) . The adaptation for Part IV was by Alexander Courage, longtime orchestrator for Williams and Goldsmith, and features two new themes credited to Williams (whether they were written by Williams or Courage remains unclear, but the answer may be in this set's booklet).

Suffice to say, this is a massive release, one long wished for by Williams and SUPERMAN fans alike. I've got the Rhino set but may have to consider plunking down the extra scratch for this bad boy.
post #294 of 1226
The Rhino set's out of print, eh? Glad I picked it up all those years ago.
post #295 of 1226
Me too. I had no idea it was out of print until recently. It's a fabulous release, that.
post #296 of 1226
Banks, you beat me to it! I was just about to post this...

This is unspeakably awesome news, coming from someone who preordered the Rhino set way back in 2000.

Apparently this WON'T be a limited-issue run, as Lukas Kendall has said on the FSM boards they'll have 3000 in the first run and then gauge interest from there. I just hope that the run doesn't sell out by the time I actually have money to buy this in the spring... then again, if it sells that quickly, they'll probably have another pressing (I hope).

Honestly, I'll buy it, if only because the first-generation masters were found after the Rhino set was pressed (it's what they used for the isolated score on the DVD). There were a couple of extra tracks that weren't on the Rhino set, if I recall also.

I also like the Superman IV score too... stop looking at me like that.
post #297 of 1226
The Superman IV score would be pretty brilliant if Alexander Courage hadn't arranged it like a high school recital.
post #298 of 1226
Jim, do you post over at the FSM board? If so what's your handle?
post #299 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Jim, do you post over at the FSM board? If so what's your handle?
Yeah, though I'm more of a lurker. (I go by my own name there as well.) I like film scores, but there are a lot of old school posters who get into the nuts and bolts of the scoring process and I get kind of lost.

So I usually just go there for rumored releases and general discussion. (To be honest with you, until I saw the piece at JWfan.net I hadn't even heard of the Blue Box, such was my lack of surfing time on the FSM boards.)
post #300 of 1226
New limited release from Buysoundtrax:

SURF'S UP (Mychael Danna). Limited to only 1000 units.

I've never seen this movie but bought this album based on the first sample alone ("Legends"), an absolutely gorgeous piece of music I wouldn't have pegged for an animated mockumentary about surfing penguins. Animation is an inherently schizophrenic genre as music goes (take Powell's HAPPY FEET, for instance, the SYBIL of film music), but if the album keeps the same dreamy quality for even half its running time, I'll be happy. You get many short cues, again, as befits animation, but if anyone can make that into a cohesive whole, it's Danna. He's a remarkable composer, and I'm pumped to see him getting a release like this.
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