CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Movie Miscellany › The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 7

post #301 of 1226
That really sounds like Philip Glass's The Hours. Lovely, but what do you excpet from Mychael Danna.
post #302 of 1226
It was a while ago, but someone in the (now gone) Bourne Ultimatum thread posted a listing of the soundtrack in the correct order that it appeared in the film. I just got a new comp, but lost the song order when I transferred files over. Anyone here have a good idea of what it would be?
post #303 of 1226
Well I'll be goddamned. While the "Golden Age" typically describes the early days of symphonic scoring (Rosza, Waxman, Korngold, etc), we're certainly in another golden age today for collectors. It continues to amaze me how many older scores get to see the light of day nowadays, and that's a tribute not only to the lasting quality of the music, but guys and gals who work their way through the financials and legalities to put this stuff out.

The newest title from La La Land may not be a timeless classic, but it's been a holy grail of mine for many years, possibly my favorite score by this composer, and I'm astounded to see it get a release nearly 17 years (wow, that makes me feel old) after the movie came out.

POINT BREAK (Mark Isham). Limited to 2000 copies.

This is a long album (65 minutes) for a film like this and looks to be the bulk of what Isham wrote. Near as I can tell, every key scoring sequence gets its due: the main titles, the night surfing sequence, the gorgeously scored first skydiving sequence, the love theme. I'm a very happy camper.

Now, if we can only get Isham's SPARTAN released, then my two favorite Isham scores will have seen the light of day.
post #304 of 1226
Just downloaded Johnny Greenwood's There Will Be Blood soundtrack.

Wow. This is the best score I have heard in a long time. Wouldn't be surprised if some horror films took some cues from this. "Open Markets" reminds me of Bernard Herrmann.

I wouldn't be sad if a new Radiohead album were delayed if Greenwood were working on another score.
post #305 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by WayDen View Post
It was a while ago, but someone in the (now gone) Bourne Ultimatum thread posted a listing of the soundtrack in the correct order that it appeared in the film. I just got a new comp, but lost the song order when I transferred files over. Anyone here have a good idea of what it would be?
I, uh, guess it was me, WayDen. I've seen the movie a few more times since then and noticed some of the tracks could be intertwined or reappear again, but I'd say it was close to this:

1. Six Weeks Ago [Moscow Intro]
2. Thinking of Marie [Bourne on the TGV]
3. Waterloo
4. Assets and Targets [Paz called in, then offs Ross - later reused for Desh bombing Daniels]
5. Tangiers
6. Faces Without Names [Bourne w/ Nicky & lonely Landy Montage]
7. Coming Home
8. Man Vs. Man [Bourne meets Dr.Hirsch]
9. Jason Is Reborn
10. Extreme Ways (Bourne's Ultimatum)
post #306 of 1226
Thanks a lot, man! It's highly appreciated.
post #307 of 1226
Damon Albarn and Michael Nymen's work on Ravenous is one of my favorites.

All of my friends hate it when I play that end credits song from the film, but I personally love it. It's easily one of the most original scores put to film. An oddball little film, but unique just like its music.
post #308 of 1226
Here's a morbid but I think an interesting question:

Assuming John Williams dies before Spielberg (which in all likelihood will be the case), who should take over as Spielberg's composer of choice?

This also assumes that Spielberg will want to stay with only one composer, but he seems to like to stick with key creative personnel from project to project, so I think it's fair to say that he'd be monogamous.

He'd probably like Horner's unabashed emotionalism, but Horner doesn't write the way he used to (not saying that's good or bad, just that his style his changed; though for me personally, that's bad). A lot of the younger composers today are from the post-thematic generation, guys like Beltrami and even Elfman 2.0.

Maybe somebody like Giacchino?
post #309 of 1226
Horner got his foot in the door as a budget Williams/Goldsmith back in the day, but I'd like to think Spielberg would go with someone more original. I say Thomas Newman, who's already got a strong DreamWorks history.
post #310 of 1226
John Powell has shown a facility for evoking Williams, particularly in Chicken Run, where you can almost hear the Raiders of the Lost Ark temp tracks. And while he can do that, he's also shown an ability to be very versatile, and strike out on his own. It would be nice to see him get a shot with Spielberg. Failing that, James Newton Howard would be a solid choice.

The pickings are actually pretty slim for a "Spielberg-style" composer. The man likes a lot of melody and theme in his works, and as we've discussed before, there isn't a lot of that happening today.
post #311 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
I say Thomas Newman, who's already got a strong DreamWorks history.
For the same reason I was actually thinking, believe it or not, and God help me, Hans Zimmer. He's done every kind of movie under the sun using lots of different styles, and at its core his work is strongly thematic.
post #312 of 1226
What I'd be afraid of is that, whoever Spielberg hired, they'd just end up being forced to create a John Williams score. And while nobody would really want to have to do that, who's going to say no to Steven Spielberg?
post #313 of 1226
I second the vote for Michael Giacchino; I think of all the younger generation of composers, his comes the closest to resembling the thematic work of John Williams. That might be a fancy way of saying he's derivative, but I think the potential is there.
post #314 of 1226
Not a derail, but a random score question:

While listening to Cinemagic over the holidays, they had their annual "Son of a thousand scores" thing where they play nothing but film scores.

Isn't that what they do anyway? Is there a distinction between "score" and "orchestrated film music" that I don't understand? Cinemagic doesn't play soundtracks (as far as I know), and the only other things they do play are various sound bytes from the films they're featuring.

So- is the only distinction between "Son of a 1000 scores" and "regular airtime" that they don't play the sound bytes? If so, who cares?
post #315 of 1226
I just looked at the programming schedule on the channel's website and it looks like they do other types of film related content as well - Shows which highlight film clips set to certain kinds of music, old Hollywood musicals, etc. That makes me feel better about not having XM. I'd probably get bored with interruptions like that.
post #316 of 1226
It's a great channel- I just didn't know if I'd been using the term "score" wrong for the last 30 years.
post #317 of 1226
No, it sounds like you were using it right. At least in modern films, score = orchestral/instrumental underscore.

(How the term works technically vis-a-vis, say, the old musicals, I'm not sure.)
post #318 of 1226
I've always taken "soundtrack" to mean the recordings actually used in the film, whether they're underscore, needle-drops, or original songs. Whereas "score" would refer to the compositions made for the film.
post #319 of 1226
Yeah, "soundtrack" wasn't the problem- I was wondering if there was a specific definition for "score" that goes beyond music specifically orchestrated for a film.
post #320 of 1226
I guess "score" would have to include previously-existing compositions, like Kamen's Beethoven quotes in Die Hard. Can't remember-- was the Best Score Oscar for The Sting awarded to Joplin or Hamlisch?
post #321 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
Can't remember-- was the Best Score Oscar for The Sting awarded to Joplin or Hamlisch?
It went to Hamlisch but back then it was a separate category for adaptations - Best Original Song Score and Adaptation or Scoring: Adaptation. Williams won his first Oscar in this category, for FIDDLER ON THE ROOF. There was a separate category for Best Dramatic Score.

Still, it looks like it illustrates that "score" refers in any case to the underscore, whether it's a "score" in today's terms, adapting various song music to create a score (a la FIDDLER), or composing the score on which the songs are based (like, say, WEST SIDE STORY). WEST SIDE STORY actually was the last winner of a separate category called Scoring of a Musical Picture, which had been around since the late 30's.

Anyway you slice it, whether the film has songs or no songs, a film's "score" looks to be instrumental underscore.
post #322 of 1226
I own both that and Antz, and I've never known how the partnership really worked, or why it existed, since it's become obvious since that they're both fully capable on their own. Still, those two scores are some of my favorite work from either of them.
post #323 of 1226
As long as we're talking scores from animated films, I love Bruce Broughton's work on The Rescuers Down Under.

(edit) And my standby "Get to work!" piece is Goldsmith's The Construction, from Explorers.
post #324 of 1226
Not sure if it's relevant or been discussed before, but:

The opening theme tune to HOME ALONE is weirdly creepy and unsettling. I can only imagine seeing that for the first time with no hype, seeing the title and the credits, and assuming it's some festive home invasion horror movie.
post #325 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin View Post
I absolutely love the Chicken Run score, it's some of the best "get motivated and do your work, damnit!" music ever created. I was under the impression that Harry Gregson-Williams was the headliner in creating that score though, not Powell. Anybody know the full story on this?
Totally agree. "Building the Crate" in particular is such a fun, infectious cue.

I don't know the whole story, but it appears as though Powell and HGW worked on different pieces of the score, a la LAST OF THE MOHICANS (though certainly they must've collaborated more than Jones and Edelman did, which is to say at all).

They each have promos with particular cues from the score.

Powell:

Building the Crate
Main Titles (though I've heard that Powell just wrote the piece using HGW's theme)
Flight Training

HGW:

Flighty Thoughts
Rats
We Need a Miracle
End Credits

Not sure about the other cues in the score though.

I guess that's not much of an answer at all. Still a great score though.
post #326 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Here's a morbid but I think an interesting question:

Assuming John Williams dies before Spielberg (which in all likelihood will be the case), who should take over as Spielberg's composer of choice?

This also assumes that Spielberg will want to stay with only one composer, but he seems to like to stick with key creative personnel from project to project, so I think it's fair to say that he'd be monogamous.

He'd probably like Horner's unabashed emotionalism, but Horner doesn't write the way he used to (not saying that's good or bad, just that his style his changed; though for me personally, that's bad). A lot of the younger composers today are from the post-thematic generation, guys like Beltrami and even Elfman 2.0.

Maybe somebody like Giacchino?
Silvestri?
post #327 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsycheOut00 View Post
Silvestri?
Probably. That Zemeckis' guy and he and Spielberg are tight.
post #328 of 1226
I know Williams takes a lot of shit for cribbing Dvorák (and others), but I'll be pretty bummed when he kicks the bucket. I'd rather Williams have the Spielberg gig than Zimmer, or, god forbid, the most notorious theme recycler of all time. Both you and James Cameron know who I'm talking about.
post #329 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minsky View Post
I'd rather Williams have the Spielberg gig than Zimmer, or, god forbid, the most notorious theme recycler of all time. Both you and James Cameron know who I'm talking about.
He Who Shall Not Be Named would be so wrong for Spielberg. For the last several years he's grown into such an abstract composer, and Spielberg's emotional beats are usually so specific. Williams loves the dirge as much as the next guy, but he can be such a precise composer when it's required.
post #330 of 1226
Non-Spielberg Williams note:

FSM finally announced purchasing details for their big "Blue Box" (the complete SUPERMAN box-set).

Accepting orders 2/21, $120 for the box, $200 for a box with certain autographs.
post #331 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Most of the suggestions for a post-Williams Spielberg composer have been good, especially, in my opinion, James Newton Howard and Michael Giacchino.

Another name I would throw into the mix would be John Ottman, who is unlikely, but I think definitely tries to somewhat model himself on John Williams. He's not quite as full bore with the themes, but among today's crop, he is more predisposed to themes than most. He does well with varying genres, and is very brass and string heavy.
post #332 of 1226
Joel McNeely was actively courting it. There are very few modern composers (with the exception of Howard) who can use a brass section as well as Williams.
post #333 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Totally agree. "Building the Crate" in particular is such a fun, infectious cue.

They each have promos with particular cues from the score.

Powell:

Building the Crate
Main Titles (though I've heard that Powell just wrote the piece using HGW's theme)
Flight Training

HGW:

Flighty Thoughts
Rats
We Need a Miracle
End Credits
I'm totally on the side of Powell when it comes to his collaborations with Gregson Williams, so it's funny that my favorite tracks from Chicken Run are the ones you listed as being done by Powell. Exactly those ones.
post #334 of 1226
I remember having the "What if John Williams died?" a bit before Revenge of the Sith came out.

I was on a huge Battle Royale fixation at the time, and I seriously thought that Masamichi Amano would do a great job on a Star Wars score. There are some moments in the BR score that would fit in Star Wars.
post #335 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew View Post
Another name I would throw into the mix would be John Ottman, who is unlikely, but I think definitely tries to somewhat model himself on John Williams.
Ottman should be taken out of the running. His mangling of Williams' themes in Superman Returns is unforgivable, even if the blame be shared.
post #336 of 1226
Agreed. Saying "He's not quite as full bore with the themes" is a massive understatement. His scores tend to be almost entirely without melody. While that can work for something like Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang, I think that his superhero scores (for example) are a mess. They come across as unfocused.

Powell's score for X-Men: The Last Stand is much more enjoyable than Ottman's for X2, which is a far superior film. There's something sad about that.
post #337 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David View Post
Agreed. Saying "He's not quite as full bore with the themes" is a massive understatement. His scores tend to be almost entirely without melody. While that can work for something like Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang, I think that his superhero scores (for example) are a mess. They come across as unfocused.

Powell's score for X-Men: The Last Stand is much more enjoyable than Ottman's for X2, which is a far superior film. There's something sad about that.
I have no desire to listen to any of Ottman's superhero scores. The only thing I listen to of his is the Superman Returns opening credits and that's not even really his.

I love Powell's score for X3. A bit too loud, but the themes are gorgeous. And as you said, it's sad that his score went to the worst film. That tends to be Powell's curse. He does some fun scores for movies that don't deserve it.

I do really enjoy Ottman's score for KKBB though.
post #338 of 1226
No love for Ottman here neither, and just for the same reasons listed above. X2 starts great... and becomes forgettable after track 6 (Mansion attack). FF2- Rise of the Silver Surfer* starts nice and epic... and then rehashes the Surfer theme on and on and on til it gets tiresome. And Supes Returns, I'm with McNooj in that the only theme is listen to is the first, since the rest of it is such a downer in most senses of the word (probably the blame's also on the movie, but still). Then Cellular, Invasion, Gothika... Apart from KKBB (which somehow brings me memories of Williams' superior Catch Me If You Can), I think the only thing I like from him is his House of Wax.

And yeah, I brought Silvestri not only for the Zemeckis-Spielberg relationship, but also for his latter work. If you think about it, stuff like The Mummy Returns, Night at the Museum or his latest Beowulf have an adventurous (OK, playful) Williams vibe that could suit The Beard whenever his famed composer of choice goes to play the harp alongside Jesus' little angels and Nero. If only The Reaper could hold a little longer...

* Just don't get me started of the absolute bore that is his score for Part 1.
post #339 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsycheOut00 View Post
And yeah, I brought Silvestri not only for the Zemeckis-Spielberg relationship, but also for his latter work.
Silvestri's work on The Mexican, though intentionally derivative of Morricone, is quite nice.
post #340 of 1226
Ottman's main X2 theme is miles stronger then Powell's but that's about it. Powell's score is better in every other aspect.
post #341 of 1226
That's true. Ottman's X2 theme is great, which makes it very strange that it never appears in the film again. He throws a theme on to the opening, and then moves on to his toneless, themeless ways for the rest of the movie.
post #342 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Non-Spielberg Williams note:

FSM finally announced purchasing details for their big "Blue Box" (the complete SUPERMAN box-set).

Accepting orders 2/21, $120 for the box, $200 for a box with certain autographs.
Nice! Any luck ordering? I was just at the FSM boards and people are freaking out about not getting a copy. Not that I wouldn't mind an autographed one, I'm not willing to spend $200 on one.
post #343 of 1226
FSM just slipped a pretty major, long-sought-after release onto the market with zero fanfare (slyly responding to the blowback from the year-long fellating of its Blue Box):

HEAVY METAL: THE SCORE - Elmer Bernstein

This is not a limited release, and presents the complete score taken from Bernstein's own 1/4" stereo tapes (he was known to meticulously archive his own scores, God bless 'im).

I've been aware of this score since I first got heavy into film music almost 20 years ago (wow, to say it like that...), but honestly I'm not that familiar with it. But I know it's been hotly requested on CD for many many years, and the samples sound pretty awesome.
post #344 of 1226
Nice! I've actually never seen the film either, but that sounds quality.

Also, FSM's reprinting the Blue Box. Need to get my tax refunds taken care of so I can grab one. Superman IV, shockingly enough, sounds wonderful.

I also picked up scores to two other Cannon projects: Bill Conti's Masters of the Universe and Pino Donaggio's Hercules. Both sound great.
post #345 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Barg View Post
I also picked up scores to two other Cannon projects: Bill Conti's Masters of the Universe and Pino Donaggio's Hercules. Both sound great.
Where did you find MASTERS?

I'm surprised FSM is already into reprints of SUPERMAN. The first run was 3000 and that's an expensive set. John Williams, I guess.
post #346 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
I'm surprised FSM is already into reprints of SUPERMAN.
Got mine. The book is terrific too.
post #347 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Where did you find MASTERS?
Here. I'm really surprised at how much I'm listening to it. Sure, I saw the movie when I was a kid, but the music never stuck with me. I find myself digging through blogs like this on a daily basis now to see what I can find.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
I'm surprised FSM is already into reprints of SUPERMAN. The first run was 3000 and that's an expensive set. John Williams, I guess.
Honestly, I'm not. There's an audience out there for the sequel scores, and Superman IV was never released. Score fans + Superman fans + Rhino set OOP + FSM quality work = fast sales. (There's now a few folks who have overlaid a few of the SIV tracks onto the DVD's deleted scenes... makes a BIG difference.)
post #348 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Barg View Post
Here. I'm really surprised at how much I'm listening to it. Sure, I saw the movie when I was a kid, but the music never stuck with me.
I've had this album for a while. It's actually one the stars of my "great scores for crummy movies" collection, enshrined next to Jerry Goldsmith's Supergirl.

I'm thrilled about the Heavy Metal news. The more Bernstein, the better. I need Stripes.
post #349 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David View Post
I'm thrilled about the Heavy Metal news. The more Bernstein, the better. I need Stripes.
Did you grab Ghostbusters when you had the chance?
post #350 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David View Post
I'm thrilled about the Heavy Metal news. The more Bernstein, the better. I need Stripes.
I need AIRPLANE! One of my few remaining holy grails.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Movie Miscellany
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Movie Miscellany › The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread