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The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 9

post #401 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David View Post
Actually, I think that the scores are the only thing the prequels have over the original trilogy. Williams' work on the prequels is among the best of his career. He was playing way over the films' heads.
Oh, no doubt they're good (although I found William's AOTC, aside from "Across the Stars", to be quite a dull score for the most part), but they are pretty different compared to the Original Trilogy's more episodic flair.
post #402 of 1226
New limiteds from Intrada were announced yesterday, one of which is a great blast from the past, on CD for the first time:

WARGAMES (Arthur B. Rubinstein) - Limited to 2500 copies.

There were so many places to go wrong with this score. It could've succumbed to 80's kitsch. The filmmakers could've sought to evoke Joshua in the music by using electronics (which worked so well for RUNAWAY...). But in the end, Rubinstein wrote a surprisingly old fashioned Cold War movie score with just a dash of synths for some of the lighter moments. The score grounds the whole movie and is full of great singular moments: The swirling, militaristic main title. The final sequence at NORAD when Joshua is learning. The chilling flourish when Lightman asks Joshua what the primary goal is, and Joshua says, "To win the game." It's a perfect punctuation and suggests all the necessary menace without resorting to cheap gimmicks.

Anyway, it's the first CD release of the score and highly recommended.

The other release is Jerry Fielding's THE NIGHTCOMERS, limited to 1500 copies, a horror movie with an interesting hodgepodge of a score. Fielding was no stranger to cold, atonal music, but balances it here with genuinely pastoral writing (the main title is great).

Finally, FSM's latest Silver Age release is a rerelease of Goldsmith's brilliant UNDER FIRE, which for many years has only been available on CD in a rare Japanese pressing. This release is identical in substance to the previous release, although the press materials indicate that the CD is newly mastered from the album masters. No word yet on how marked the improvement is. I'm not sure if it's worth the extra scratch for something I already have. But it's not a limited release, so there's time.
post #403 of 1226
"Winner: None" from Wargames is still one of my all-time favorite cues. And when you consider that it's punctuating a scene that's really just a computer playing games with itself, it's even more impressive.

You make a good point about Rubinstein not going to electronics, especially when you see that he did exactly that on Blue Thunder.
post #404 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David View Post
"Winner: None" from Wargames is still one of my all-time favorite cues. And when you consider that it's punctuating a scene that's really just a computer playing games with itself, it's even more impressive.
Absolutely. The whole thing, it's just computer blips. That must've been extraordinarily difficult. It's like acting against a green screen. You have to compose in such a way that conjures suspense and menace when nothing is happening.

BTW, Greg, I haven't forgotten about the CD. Just finished exams. Thanks for your patience.
post #405 of 1226
Sound Clips for Indy are up at amazon.

I'm really digging "The Adventures of Mutt," and it's great hearing a few Raider's motifs pop up here and there. Can't wait to hear the whole thing.
post #406 of 1226
Has anyone given a complete listen to the Indy IV score? If so, what did you think? (I have yet to see the movie or listen to the score).

I'm curious if John Williams (who is pretty much retired at this point) still has the magic or not.
post #407 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by A. Lively View Post
Has anyone given a complete listen to the Indy IV score? If so, what did you think? (I have yet to see the movie or listen to the score).

I'm curious if John Williams (who is pretty much retired at this point) still has the magic or not.
Its mostly boring, it works better in the actual movie.
post #408 of 1226
Saw Indy 4 last night. The score was pretty much devoid of any new themes. It's fun to hear all of the quoting from the originals, but it sounds like a phone-in from Williams. I'm really disappointed.
post #409 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans Gruber's EYE CONDITION! View Post
Its mostly boring, it works better in the actual movie.
That would be a change-up for Williams. I usually find that his stuff works brilliantly in album form, but calls too much attention to itself in the film.
post #410 of 1226
Recently, I watched Pleasantville, and I LOVED the score. The other music choices were also excellent, including Take Five, Claire de Lune (my favorite classical piece), and Fiona Apple's rendition of Across the Universe.
post #411 of 1226
Yeah, Randy Newman did beautiful stuff with the Pleasantville score. Sometimes his Americana stuff is strong, and sometimes it seems like a spoof of itself, like in "Seabiscuit". I didn't see it, how was his score of "Leatherheads"?
post #412 of 1226
I'm dieing to listen to Hans Zimmer's The Dark Knight score, seeing as I haven't heard anything new from him since The Simpsons' Movie.
post #413 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by KABONG View Post
Yeah, Randy Newman did beautiful stuff with the Pleasantville score. Sometimes his Americana stuff is strong, and sometimes it seems like a spoof of itself, like in "Seabiscuit". I didn't see it, how was his score of "Leatherheads"?
Pretty good, if you like the quieter moments of his work on The Natural.
post #414 of 1226
Out of sheer bordom (I had to stay near home and wait for work to call all day yesterday) I threw in Return of the King and let it play in the background while I did other things. I think that the 'lighting of the beacons' sequence may be the best symphonic movie music moment of my life time. The whole thing is just so fucking majestic, and it ends perfectly, with silence, Viggo's line ("Gondor calls for aid!"), a dramatic pause, Bernard Hill's answer ("Then Rohan will answer"), and a cue of the Rohan theme. It chokes me up every time.
post #415 of 1226
I remember when ROTK was in theaters, I'd try to sneak in for a peek when I was finished with whatever movie I paid to see.

I always hoped that I'd sneak in at 2 specific moments. The Ride of the Rohirrim at Minas Tirith... and the Lighting of the Beacons. A heart-swelling theme. I loved it so much.

To continue... I've said this multiple times in the Speed Racer thread, but I want to put it here too. 'Reboot' is my favorite piece of movie score I've heard so far this year. It's epic, emotional, and it's kinda funky with that bass line.

Giacchino wins so far this year. I never knew I'd enjoy a Speed Racer movie and score so much.
post #416 of 1226
Bump. I'm late to the party here, but I just heard Gabriel Yared's Troy. WOW.
post #417 of 1226
I know, right? How about that "Approach of the Greeks" opening?
post #418 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
I know, right? How about that "Approach of the Greeks" opening?
Seriously. What kind of test audience says that music stinks? Granted, the movie was no great epic (I am interested in checking out the DC, though), but that could have lifted the film a couple notches.

Other stuff:
La La Land is putting out a 2-disc Masters of the Universe this month.

How is the Blue Box, by the way? Damn bills keep getting in the way of me picking it up.
post #419 of 1226
That whole story about how a year of Yared's effort got flushed because some people found the score too 'old-fashioned' never fails to rile me up.

That Petersen's extended cut of the film failed to incorporate Yared's score continues the suckage.
post #420 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
That whole story about how a year of Yared's effort got flushed because some people found the score too 'old-fashioned' never fails to rile me up.
Yeah, not like a Greek epic could use an old-fashioned approach. Besides, a $200m project is not going to live or die on its score alone. Now, everyone in the cast not named Bana, Pitt or Bean mailing it in... that's another story. (I haven't seen the film since its theatrical run, so another view is probably in order.)

Anyway, back to music. How is it that there hasn't been a CD release of the original score to Fritz Lang's Metropolis yet? Anyone know what kind of legal issues would need to be taken care of?
post #421 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
That whole story about how a year of Yared's effort got flushed because some people found the score too 'old-fashioned' never fails to rile me up.
What's more confusing/maddening is the fact that Horner's replacement wasn't any less "old fashioned" than Yared's. Hell, he used the same vocalist. And it was clear they'd dug at least some of Yared's work since the climactic Achilles-Hector fight sounded similar in both scores. Horner's score was certainly more broad with its simpler chord progressions, but it wasn't any more timeless.

I don't dislike Horner's effort, but the fact that Yared's score was chucked doesn't bother me so much as that the replacement wasn't a departure in any way, shape or form. Not totally unlike Tyler's replacement score for TIMELINE.
post #422 of 1226
When I finally saw the movie, I remember thinking that what Horner did was just kinda bland. Like I'd heard it all before. I never really gave Yared's original score a very thorough listen. Maybe it was my mindset, but I remember it sounding much more 'risky'. Risky might not be the right word... but just more complex?
post #423 of 1226
Absolutely hated the music when the princes return to Troy. Such an obnoxious piece.
post #424 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Barg View Post
How is the Blue Box, by the way? Damn bills keep getting in the way of me picking it up.
It's kind of exhausting, really. The big treat is the Superman IV score, which is smoother and warmer than the straight Williams stuff. The liner notes are really detailed about the original cut of that film, too. I'm glad Courage got to see this release happen before he passed.
post #425 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
When I finally saw the movie, I remember thinking that what Horner did was just kinda bland. Like I'd heard it all before. I never really gave Yared's original score a very thorough listen. Maybe it was my mindset, but I remember it sounding much more 'risky'. Risky might not be the right word... but just more complex?
Complex might be a better word. The best way to describe it is the same exact approach filtered through two different sensibilities. Horner, for all his advanced degrees, has become a very emotionally direct composer. He seems happiest writing very plaintive, lyrical melodies, usually in major. He can write complex, knockout material, but I totally agree that his TROY's biggest problem was being bland. Yared can do the lush thing too, but his writing is more suggestive, I think. He doesn't slam you over the head with themes. His music builds from smaller parts, rather than Horner's broad brush strokes. But you could hear in TROY his trying to give it that old fashioned feel while keeping his voice. He still wrote great themes, but they're a bit meatier to digest (George Fenton writes like this too).

Apropos of nothing, and I might of mentioned it in this thread, but his POSSESSION has one of the best themes he's written, a tuneful wallop that's given the aria treatment by Andrea Bocelli. It's fucking glorious.
post #426 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Boom View Post
Absolutely hated the music when the princes return to Troy. Such an obnoxious piece.
I KNOW! I remember thinking it was something equivalent to someone screaming, "THE HEROES ARE HOME!" right next to my ear. It stuck out like a sore thumb.
post #427 of 1226
Well shoot, now that this thread has been bumped I'd like to open the floor to discussion about the scores for Wall*E, The Dark Knight, Hellboy, and such.

Quick reactions:


Wall*E is pretty familiar for those who've heard much Thomas Newman. He's in full-on "quirky" mode here, but I think it's a good fit for the subject matter. He also really nails the parts that call for a grander scope, particularly the Rocket Launch and the Space Dance. I don't know how much repeat listening it's going to get in the long run - it certainly hasn't sunk claws into me like the Ratatouille score did.


The Dark Knight score I think is mostly just kind of moody, non-intrusive music that'll fit the movie just fine, but aside from a few tracks I'm not sure if any of it is truly memorable. I'll have to actually see the movie before I can make too many judgments though.

Personally I find the main "Batman" theme to be really boring, and it makes quite a few appearances here. How many times can you tread over the same minor 3rd interval? They do spice it up this time with some overlying melodies that give it a bit more direction.

That said, I think the Joker's music is just the right kind of abrasive, unsettling sound to underscore his anarchy. The track entitled "Watch the World Burn" has a really dark, heavy progression that invokes a feeling of utter horror. I can't wait to see what the scene that it goes with, I'm betting it's something with Two-Face.

I haven't heard the Hellboy score yet.
post #428 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
I KNOW! I remember thinking it was something equivalent to someone screaming, "THE HEROES ARE HOME!" right next to my ear. It stuck out like a sore thumb.
What stuck out even more for me was why the theme from Wrath of Khan was showing up in a Greek epic. Or why the Greek army advancing was met with a note-for-note, key-for-key reprise of the Enemy at the Gates score. Horner's written some of the best scores of the 80's and 90's, but he has been a big lazy slob this decade, and none his hack jobs piss me off more than his score for Troy. Partly because of how someone can get paid so much and put absolutely shit effort into their score, but also because of how damn good Yared's score was.
post #429 of 1226
You think Horner would've done exactly the same thing even if he hadn't had to do a rush job and was given the same amount of time Yared had?
post #430 of 1226
I can't remember if I already posted this here:

http://benuits-itsonlyapapermoon.blogspot.com/

This blog is awesome!!!
post #431 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
You think Horner would've done exactly the same thing even if he hadn't had to do a rush job and was given the same amount of time Yared had?
I'm with Greg on this one. I think the score would've sounded more or less the same. Danger motif, sappy love theme, generic action. Rinse, repeat. It's been clear the last few years when Horner's been inspired (CHUMSCRUBBER, ZORRO), and when he's not.
post #432 of 1226
Zorro IS fun. I wouldn't know that Horner had done it based on his other work. I haven't seen anything of Chumscrubber. Is the film good?
post #433 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
I can't remember if I already posted this here:

http://benuits-itsonlyapapermoon.blogspot.com/

This blog is awesome!!!
Oh my
post #434 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
Zorro IS fun. I wouldn't know that Horner had done it based on his other work. I haven't seen anything of Chumscrubber. Is the film good?
I haven't seen it. I blind bought the soundtrack based on some review and a few clips. Has a fun little main theme, but the piece de resistance is "Digging Montage," a seven minute master class of mood and texture. On the whole the score is very much Horner in intimate drama mode; him on piano, small collection of instruments aided by electronics. But the difference here with something like HOUSE OF SAND AND FOG is there's a personality and cohesion not often seen with his work in recent years. It's not boring, and with Horner that's saying something.
post #435 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Chocula View Post
Don't be TOO excited though. A lot of these are bootlegs (obviously) and can be questionable on the audio quality side of things. But still, it's very cool to hear some of this stuff.
post #436 of 1226
Zorro is incredible work. Love it to death and I'm not the biggest Horner guy.

It also has the Evil Horner Motif. I'd love to figure out how many scores he's used it in.
post #437 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Boom View Post
It also has the Evil Horner Motif. I'd love to figure out how many scores he's used it in.
WARNING: DO NOT PLAY 4-NOTE HORNER DANGER MOTIF DRINKING GAME.
post #438 of 1226
Walking the dog this morning I was listening to "Song for Bob" from THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES. Goddamn that's a gorgeous track.

More thoughts on the DARK KNIGHT score? I agree with A. Lively's post above that it's much more about mood and texture than BEGINS was, and as such it makes for a less cohesive album. Though I guess that's the point. I can't get behind Zimmer's calling the music "experimental" (his words), but I do dig the Joker music, and even if it wears out its welcome on album it works wonders in the film. Really like that first track, but then the temp was obviously Goldenthal's first cue from HEAT, which is one of my favorite film music pieces of all time. So there you go.
post #439 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabe Powers View Post
Out of sheer bordom (I had to stay near home and wait for work to call all day yesterday) I threw in Return of the King and let it play in the background while I did other things. I think that the 'lighting of the beacons' sequence may be the best symphonic movie music moment of my life time. The whole thing is just so fucking majestic, and it ends perfectly, with silence, Viggo's line ("Gondor calls for aid!"), a dramatic pause, Bernard Hill's answer ("Then Rohan will answer"), and a cue of the Rohan theme. It chokes me up every time.
I get that vibe too. I've found the LOTR soundtracks to be the most approachable and repeatable of all the soundtracks I've had, and I love revisiting it, particularly to get feelings like this at those certain parts.

With TDK...I thought the Joker theme was amazing. Though it felt so much more like a horror film thing on a first listen, seeing it fitted into the film just added to the appreciation I have for that piece.

The Morricone "Dollars Trilogy" scores are also something I felt I had to mention. I love the motifs and the three themes for those films...it immediately throws me back to the movie, just as a good soundtrack should.
post #440 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mugatu View Post
I love the motifs and the three themes for those films...it immediately throws me back to the movie, just as a good soundtrack should.
(Underlined by me)

See, this is an attitude I've struggled with most of my life. I'm not so sure it's true. Yes, there are certain cues and themes that throw me right into the feel of watching the movie again, but I'm not positive that that's a good thing. My favorite film cues are often the ones with a life of their own, that I can find a deeper appreciation of outside the film itself. Maybe this is why I love so many pieces that were cut from their films, or pieces from movies I don't particularly like. They can live and breathe on their own, without being tied down to anything in my imagination. If I only listened to scores for movies I like, I would never have heard Jerry Goldsmith's incredible Supergirl, or Bruce Broughton's amazing Lost in Space. Those certainly aren't movies I really want to have evoked for me, but as standalone music, they're beautiful work.
post #441 of 1226
Paycheck was like that for me. I listened to it on CD and thought, "I don't remember ANY of this... this is great!"

I like to have it both ways. Music that allows me to relive the emotional highs in the film (Speed Racer and The Iron Giant come to mind) and ones that are just awesome (that didn't do anything for me in the theater... so did it fail?).
post #442 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
Zorro IS fun. I wouldn't know that Horner had done it based on his other work. I haven't seen anything of Chumscrubber. Is the film good?
Chumscrubber is... eh? Not great, but has some interesting stuff. The whole thing is twisted suburbia, but it gets into some odd magical realism moments and some goofy humor- essentially what if "Alpha Dog" happened an no one gave a shit? I don't really remember much of the score, lots of pop music in that.

Some other movie music blogs...
http://archer-bullseye.blogspot.com/

http://dartmansworldofwonder.blogspot.com/

http://the-manchester-morgue.blogspot.com/

http://thedocsjunkdrawer.blogspot.com/

http://rarescoresounds.blogspot.com/

and this is a great one... http://my.opera.com/indrid%20cold/blog/
post #443 of 1226
Can anyone show me this four note danger motif of Horner's?
post #444 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultraman Mac View Post
Can anyone show me this four note danger motif of Horner's?
http://home.comcast.net/~yeahyeah11/fournote.mp3

This note's for you.....
post #445 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero View Post
Walking the dog this morning I was listening to "Song for Bob" from THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES. Goddamn that's a gorgeous track.
There's this great guitar bit at the very end of the credits to the film, and it isn't on the score CD and it kind of pisses me off. But the rest of the score is so damn great I can't complain too much.
post #446 of 1226
I'm sure its been mentioned a hundred times in this thread, but Morricones score to The Mission and in particular Gabriels Oboe has been possibly my favourite piece of orchestral music for over 20 years and to this day it still brings tears to my eyes.

Simply beyond beautiful, it speaks to me more deeply than almost any other musical piece.

ETA I guess that makes me a gigantic walking cliche huh.
post #447 of 1226

MY TOP 9 FILM SCORES OF THE LAST 31 YEARS (random; I know)

1. Halloween (1978)-John Carpenter (Carpenter himself said that the music saved the film)

2. The Fog (1979)-John Carpenter (what can I say; the guy can create a mood like no other)

3. Superman (1977)-John Williams (made the material believable)

4. Once Upon a Time in America (1984)-Ennio Morricone (beautiful, epic, and haunting)

5. Glory (1989)-James Horner (arguably the best score to a film ever; Horner's use of The Boy's Choir of Harlem was genius)

6. Homeboy (1989)-Eric Clapton (Great painting on a not so great canvas)

7. Last of the Mohicans (1992)-Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman (gets the blood pumping; sampled in an awesome Nike ad last year for football season)

8. Capturing the Freidman's (2003)-Andrea Morricone (chip off the old block)

9. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)-Nick Cave and Warren Ellis (how this score was overlooked at awards season is beyond me; it really held the film together)
post #448 of 1226
pacsboy - You should make it a top 10 and throw The Fountain in there. Do your ears a favour and listen to it whilst on a long train journey. Or, you know, whilst thinking of a particular person you'd go the end's of the earth for.

It remains possibly one of the most beautiful (and beautifully haunting) scores I've ever heard.
post #449 of 1226
Just found the 3 disc anniversary version of Goldsmiths Trek TMP score, and holy f'ing hell is it more brilliant and nuanced than I remember. Spock's Arrival is the standout for me, it could be easily mistaken for Stravinsky.
post #450 of 1226
I absolutely love that score. As has been mentioned earlier in this thread, Goldsmith had a real knack for creating beautiful scores for films that didn't deserve them. This really is one of his best. It has a sense of mystery and awe that no other science fiction score has ever matched.
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