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The Composers, Scores, and the Chewers Who Love Them Thread - Page 2

post #51 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
His work on the Passion Of The Christ is equally breathtaking, and it is his contribution that makes the film as emotionally engaging as it is, not Gibson's. .
I don't know if i'm alone in this, but the score of Passion of the Christ made me think way too much to Peter Gabriel's Passion: The Last Temptaton of Christ score. It's the one to beat.
post #52 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Bodhisattva
I do like the Titanic score but Celine Dion is just a dealbreaker for me.
So don't watch the end credits ... there are plenty of movies that tack on a vocal track over the end credits just to give one of the studio's recording artists something to do.
post #53 of 1226
I just realized I forgot to mention my all time favorite: the score to Ravenous by Damon Albarn and Michael Nyman. LOVE those insane strings.
post #54 of 1226
Bernard Herrmann's Cape Fear is brilliant, so is the rest of his work. Angelo Badalamenti is also brilliant (He scored almost all of David Lynch's movies).

I'm also big fans of Jon Brion, Michael Giacchino (his work on The Incredibles and LOST is fantastic) and enoy me some Ennio Morricone
post #55 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
John Debney is sadly ignored by virtually everyone when it comes to the appreciation of composers. His work on Cutthroat Island yielded one of the best swashbuckling scores ever made (if not the best), but it had the unfortunate luck of being attached to a horrible movie. His work on the Passion Of The Christ is equally breathtaking, and it is his contribution that makes the film as emotionally engaging as it is, not Gibson's. But once again he was forgotten, this time because he worked on a picture that was overshadowed by a superstar director and purposely skirted around come awards season due to controversy.
I love that Cutthroat Island score. Debney's work on the Sin City score is fantastic, probably the best music from that whole movie.
post #56 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson
Patrick Doyle is another underrated composer. Yeah, he scored Goblet of Fire, but after his scores for Henry V and Dead Again, I thought he'd be bigger. His Henry score in particular does a nice job of sounding period without alienating a modern audience, and Dead Again has a nice lush noir sound to it.
Yeah, Doyle is great. he's not afraid to do a big score, and I actually think his music is what made Branagh's often over-the-top approach to "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein" and even parts of "Hamlet" okay.

I also love his score for "Great Expectations", and odd pick I know. But there's a piece there called "Kissing in the Rain" with Tori Amos as his Lisa Gerard that is just fantastic.
post #57 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Okay, so almost 60 posts into this thing and we've hardly mentioned Hans Zimmer. Is there a negative opinion around these parts or what?

Like any composer, he has his share of time fillers. But I'd say he is sort of like John Williams in that he got known for and somewhat pigeonholed in a genre he did very well, and doesn't get enough credit for the times he breaks that mold. Bruckheimer scores made him a name, I think "The Thin Red Line" marked a turning point.

Ffrom there it was "Gladiator", a classic, straight into "Hannibal" (underrated) and "Black Hawk Down", another fantastic and diverse score. Done in 15 days no less. I for one really liked his work on "Batman Begins" as well, though I know we're far from a consensus on that one.

I really like the majority of his work, and I think he's better than his Bruckheimer origins tend to get him credit for.
post #58 of 1226
I won't pretend to be an expert on a lot of these guys but I almost always enjoy Zimmer's work. He has a ton of beats in BROKEN ARROW that were just perfect, especially that bit when Travolta emerges from the canyon.

For what it's worth, I like Graeme Revell.
post #59 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
But there's a piece there called "Kissing in the Rain" with Tori Amos as his Lisa Gerard that is just fantastic.
I'll have to check this out.

As I stated earlier, Zimmer's done a great job so far. Black Hawk Down is wickedly fun to play, as it's dark and brooding, and won't stop to lighten up.

One composer that I find interesting, if uneven, is Graeme Revell. He can put some fantastic work ( The Crow, Pitch Black, The Insider - with Lisa Gerrard) and some bland stuff ( Dune miniserie, Tomb Raider, The Chronicle of Riddick).

One soundtrack to look for by Revell is the rejected soundtrack for The 13th Warrior, recorded with Lisa Gerrard. Less bombastic than Goldsmith hurried score, it's a whole different take on this tale, going for a more earthy and organic tone.
post #60 of 1226
People may think this is an odd view, but I still think that The Lion King might be Hans Zimmer's best work. Word is that he also worked on instrumentation on the musical numbers. To Die For, in particular, is an awesome track (and I mean "awesome" in its non-surfer usage).

I've enjoyed Graeme Revell's work, but the unfortunate thing about his scores is that they have a tendency to be buried in films that promote big soundtrack albums. His cues have been drowned by pop music so many times, it's depressing. I'd love to get a score album for Titan A.E, but I don't see that happening.
post #61 of 1226
I enjoyed parts of Beltrami's score to the Faculty, and his theme for T3 isn't half bad. I've heard a few scores by Revell, but nothing particularly memorable comes to mind.
post #62 of 1226
Aside from THE CROW, I love what Revell did with HARD TARGET. That whole final half hour is a great loud bombastic score and fits the events on screen just right. I liked his SIN CITY stuff as well.
post #63 of 1226
I'm a bit surprised that Alan Silvestri hasn't been mentioned yet. He composed some fantastic scores in the eighties, especially for "Back To The Future" and "Predator". His "Predator" score was one of the first movie themes that I remember humming.

I liked his score for "Forrest Gump", but apart from that he kind of fell off the map in the 90's for me.
post #64 of 1226
A look at IMDB shows that he's been scoring a steady stream of crap for some time now. I wonder what happened. Did being removed from Mission: Impossible hurt him that bad?
post #65 of 1226
Just have to throw in some love for Barry's "Out of Africa" score. Lovely and soaring, "Flying Over Africa" still gives me shivers and always makes me flash to the scene with the plane swooping over the lake of flamingos.
post #66 of 1226
I like Clint Mansell's work. Elements from Requiem for a Dream have been used over and over for other films' trailers. I'm really looking forward to his work on The Fountain. The couple songs he did for Pi were really cool, but you have to like electronic music.
post #67 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSU Masterchief
I'm a bit surprised that Alan Silvestri hasn't been mentioned yet. He composed some fantastic scores in the eighties, especially for "Back To The Future" and "Predator". His "Predator" score was one of the first movie themes that I remember humming.

I liked his score for "Forrest Gump", but apart from that he kind of fell off the map in the 90's for me.
His music for The Mummy Returns is a fun bit of scoring too.
post #68 of 1226
Not to mention ENTER THE DRAGON.
post #69 of 1226
I've always loved Lalo Schifrin's work in the late sixties, early seventies, he scored 'Bullitt', 'Dirty Harry' and he created the theme for 'Mission Impossible', I know he doesn't really do movie scores anymore but he was pretty damn good back then.
post #70 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
If as a director I was given Graeme Revell or Marco Beltrami for a composer when there are so many other talented-but-cheap composers available, I would be so fucking pissed. With the exception of The Crow, these two bring nothing but blandness to any film they score.
I've liked a track or two here and there, but overall, I couldn't agree more. Whenever I see one of those two guys attached my hopes just sort of dwindle. They seem to be the choice of directors for films that don't really give a shit about the score. Fair ot not, they've composed a lot of noise.
post #71 of 1226
Although I really don't think the movie has held up that well, the score still sounds really vibrant.
post #72 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieNarc
I like Clint Mansell's work. Elements from Requiem for a Dream have been used over and over for other films' trailers. I'm really looking forward to his work on The Fountain. The couple songs he did for Pi were really cool, but you have to like electronic music.
Mansell can be good, and he has the advantage of having one pretty famous track. I was acually really pleasantly surprised by his score for "Sahara". It's a really old-school adventure score, completely new and unique in his filmography. It was a lot fuller than I've ever heard him compose.
post #73 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon Ma
Although I really don't think the movie has held up that well, the score still sounds really vibrant.
ETD?
post #74 of 1226
Yeah, I should've mentioned the name.
post #75 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Mansell can be good, and he has the advantage of having one pretty famous track. I was acually really pleasantly surprised by his score for "Sahara". It's a really old-school adventure score, completely new and unique in his filmography. It was a lot fuller than I've ever heard him compose.
I actually think Mansell's work in the last third of Requiem for a Dream is his best stuff. The entire winter section has a score that can only be described as being taken to hell and back, just how it builds and builds with the images, the Kronos String Quartet's arrangements slowly overshadowed by industrial metallic thumping always makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end.
post #76 of 1226
I'd also like to say I love David Holmes work primarily with Soderbergh in his lighter films like 'Out of Sight' and the Oceans Eleven films, just really good punchy scores that fit the films like a glove.
post #77 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormin
John Debney is sadly ignored by virtually everyone when it comes to the appreciation of composers. His work on Cutthroat Island yielded one of the best swashbuckling scores ever made (if not the best), but it had the unfortunate luck of being attached to a horrible movie. His work on the Passion Of The Christ is equally breathtaking, and it is his contribution that makes the film as emotionally engaging as it is, not Gibson's. But once again he was forgotten, this time because he worked on a picture that was overshadowed by a superstar director and purposely skirted around come awards season due to controversy.
I like Debney well enough but to me his music just doesn't have much of a personality. I do like CUTTHROAT ISLAND, but my favorites of his are older action scores like SUDDEN DEATH and END OF DAYS, before he began taking on cute little comedies and treacly drama. He's also another guy, like Brian Tyler or William Ross now and David Newman a few years back, who falls victim to temp track-itis on occasion, and I'd include PASSION there, which sounds more like THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST or RABBIT PROOF FENCE. If it works well in the movie that's one thing, but it's just not terribly original or interesting music. Just my $.02.

That said, I think Debney is a solid craftsman who has the potential to be a big gun, and I really hope he does so because I like his big, broad style. I'm worried he'll become this generation's Bruce Broughton.


About Revell, I'm not a huge fan either but let's not forget his score to THE SAINT.
post #78 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Revell and Beltrami irk me in that they pretty much score the boring movies nobody else wants, but when they have had big opportunities to show off, they take the same boring, low key approach they always do. Revell could have done all sorts of thing with a goofy superhero movie like "Daredevil", could have orchestrated it to the hilt. No, just a blah little half-theme, thats every bit as ploddingly dull and serious as the movie.

Ditto Beltrami. How do you score the third Terminator film and not do an orchestration of the main theme? Did he really think he was too important to orchestrate someone else's theme? I liked the one track playing over the firing nukes, but that too was a grand opportunity to knock it out of the park, and he whiffed. And for the sticklers, yes, I know he orchestrated it for the end credits, but that's just dumb. Put it in the movie.
post #79 of 1226
I have absolute hatred for Beltrami. He sucks.
post #80 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Mansell can be good, and he has the advantage of having one pretty famous track. I was acually really pleasantly surprised by his score for "Sahara". It's a really old-school adventure score, completely new and unique in his filmography. It was a lot fuller than I've ever heard him compose.
The Sahara score seemed very Bond-ish to me.
post #81 of 1226
I remember reading an interview with Guillermo Del Toro (it might have been here) where he said he always had to push Beltrami to go big in the big moments, like he was always wanting to shy away from the big emotional stuff and be more restrained. It struck me so odd because I always figured that's the moment you live for as a composer, getting to provide the huge emotional wallop.
post #82 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Banks is my hero
I remember reading an interview with Guillermo Del Toro (it might have been here) where he said he always had to push Beltrami to go big in the big moments, like he was always wanting to shy away from the big emotional stuff and be more restrained. It struck me so odd because I always figured that's the moment you live for as a composer, getting to provide the huge emotional wallop.
That sounds about right. The guy writes background music. No power, no emotion, no depth. Just moody noise.
post #83 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
Ditto Beltrami. How do you score the third Terminator film and not do an orchestration of the main theme?
You could essentially apply this same argument to THE OMEN, which is ironic considering who wrote the original. I haven't heard the new score yet myself, but I have it on good authority that it's suspiciously light on choir. How the fuck can you score the Antichrist without some chanting?
post #84 of 1226
Thread Starter 
These threads are too often just who we like. Kind of refreshing to see some "dislikes" getting discussed.

I'll start it up. James Horner. No one can argue he's done some great stuff.....a decade ago. For my money, he's been on an 8 year creative hiatus where "The Mask of Zorro" was the last time he did anything new worth listening to. Flourishes in "A Beautiful Mind" maybe, but even that was just cobbled together from his previously good scores. He's now about as unexciting as any other anonymous composer, which is sad considering where he had been.
post #85 of 1226
The irony about Horner, for all that's said about him repeating himself, is that his best stuff (WOLFEN, STAR TREK, ALIENS) was done when he was constantly repeating himself.
post #86 of 1226
There’s only one composer I can’t stand and its Michael Nyman. The guy could suck the life out of Tony Little. I have to watch Gattaca with subtitles.
post #87 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew
James Horner ... For my money, he's been on an 8 year creative hiatus where "The Mask of Zorro" was the last time he did anything new worth listening to.
I agree nearly 100%, except for last year's CHUMSCRUBBER, which I think was Horner's best, most inspired score in years.
post #88 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa Quagmire
What do you guys say of Carter Burwell? He's done some very versatile work over the years. Love his Coen scores, especially in Miller's Crossing and some stuff in Being John Malkovich is beautiful. And then he does a score like he did for Three Kings - totally different in style and attitude than anything he has done before.
I like Burwell but I don't love him. I think he's done a few standouts (the brilliant AND THE BAND PLAYED ON, ROB ROY, the MILLER'S CROSSING and FARGO themes), but his music just rarely engages me. I can see why people might like him because's not overly mawkish, but I find his scores often lack some real meat I can sink my teeth into.
post #89 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike Marshall
Kenji Kawai's work on Ghost in the Shell and Seven Swords is pretty incredible, and the electronica/orchestrated score for Oldboy, and Baroque OST for Lady Vengenace are wonderfully well done.
She also did the music for Avalon.
Unfortunately i´m not really into asian cinema so i haven´t heard any of her other works.
post #90 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by temos
Is this the right place to mention the one and only Vince DiCola, who did Transformers the Movie and Rocky 4? I loved those funky scores when I wasa a kid, and can't help but still enjoy them. I really liked what he did in Rocky 4 too with his synthesizer, paritcularly the Training Montage, which is my workout music of choice. He's only done one film since those, which was a horrible DTV piece of crap, that lacked the pazzaz he put into R4 and TTM.
Hey man, a score is a score.

Sure, DiCola's work for those films is a little dated now, but I love 'em both. Same with all those old Harold Faltermeyer scores.
post #91 of 1226
Thread Starter 
I just rewatched "Leon" and remembered how much I love Eric Serra's score. I know some Bond purists hate his "Goldeneye" score, but I've always loved it, as well as "Le Femme Nikita". He doesn't seem to work as much as a lot of composers, but he's always been interesting to me.
post #92 of 1226
Great idea for a thread. My love for film music and filmmaking go hand-in-hand. A truly amazing score can turn a solid film into a memorable one for me.

James Horner's WILLOW is probably in my top 5. I think I found a used one on Amazon or something, but a remastered version of the CD needs to be released ASAP. Lush, with just the right touch of melodrama and expansiveness...it has a timelessness and comforting tone that I'll always cherish.
post #93 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike Marshall
I'm probably going to get my arse kicked for stating this but I really love some of the contemporary asian scores which have come out recently.

Kenji Kawai's work on Ghost in the Shell and Seven Swords is pretty incredible, and the electronica/orchestrated score for Oldboy, and Baroque OST for Lady Vengenace are wonderfully well done.

I'm something of a neophyte regarding contemporary Japanese film composing, but I get the sense that there are some really interesting things going on in that world. The opening theme for Elfenlied, for example, is a pastiche of plainchant and late-Romantic schmaltz...and it's gorgeous. The composers, Kayo Konishi and Yukio Kondou, are a complete mystery to me.

Also, I love John Williams' Bombasticity, but even if you don't, there is much more to the man's music than brassy fanfares and flute arpeggios. Check out his scores for Jane Eyre, Schindler's List, Memoirs of a Geisha, AI, Angela's Ashes. Heck, even his Prisoner of Azkaban score is a model of restraint, although it admittedly features some (wonderful, charming) flute noodling.
post #94 of 1226
John Williams' MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA could be his best score in years, and that's saying a lot with heavyweights like MUNICH, REVENGE OF THE SITH, WAR OF THE WORLDS, and PRISONER OF AZKABAN all worth owning.
post #95 of 1226
On the subject of Vince DiCola's Transformers score, have any of you heard the complete album? It's called "When All Are One", and it was sold as a special item at a convention, I think. I managed to download the whole thing piecemeal on Limewire, back when I still did that sort of thing. The weird thing is that, while it contains a hell of a lot more music than the three cues that were on the official soundtrack album, it doesn't contain those three tracks (rights issues, I'm guessing). So you have to try to combine them, and place those tracks in the proper chronological order.

As dated as the score sounds now, I really enjoy it, probably because there's nothing else out there quite like it.
post #96 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
On the subject of Vince DiCola's Transformers score, have any of you heard the complete album? It's called "When All Are One", and it was sold as a special item at a convention, I think. I managed to download the whole thing piecemeal on Limewire, back when I still did that sort of thing. The weird thing is that, while it contains a hell of a lot more music than the three cues that were on the official soundtrack album, it doesn't contain those three tracks (rights issues, I'm guessing). So you have to try to combine them, and place those tracks in the proper chronological order.

As dated as the score sounds now, I really enjoy it, probably because there's nothing else out there quite like it.
Check out the Rocky IV soundtrack for more from DiCola. I bet there are a few mid-80s soundtracks with a similar synthesizer-heavy sound if you look around.
post #97 of 1226
I always saw Harry Gregson-William as a pseudo-clone of Hans Zimmer since I heard of him.

I've been listening to the Kingdom of Heaven soundtrack since the last 2 weeks.
Well, this album proved me dead wrong. He really managed to blend Middle-eastern, medieval and classical influences into a really great piece of work for one of the most butchered movie ever. Amen to the director's cut.
post #98 of 1226
Thread Starter 
Yeah, "Kingdom of Heaven" is a great score. The new DC enhances it even more by doing the "Overture-Entracte" format which I loved. The special features on that DVD really made me like Gregson-Williams too. He was self-deprecating bt confident, real, and much younger seeming than his peers. He had one cool part of his interview where he was talking about the orchestra and how he likes getting to know them and involving them in the process. he has portions of the scoring session where he just watches the movie with them so they get a feel of what's going on and to make it more personal to them because as he said, "They've got Gabriel Yared one week, Zimmer the next, and so on". Cool guy.
post #99 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigel St. Buggering
People may think this is an odd view, but I still think that The Lion King might be Hans Zimmer's best work. Word is that he also worked on instrumentation on the musical numbers. To Die For, in particular, is an awesome track (and I mean "awesome" in its non-surfer usage).
I second that. I usually just skip all the songs and go straight for the Zimmer tracks.

Edit: Oh and John Debney? Fuck yeah, if only for The Scorpion King, a movie I will never hide my unseemly man-love for.
post #100 of 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desslar
Check out the Rocky IV soundtrack for more from DiCola. I bet there are a few mid-80s soundtracks with a similar synthesizer-heavy sound if you look around.
For me, Rocky IV is THE 80's soundtrack. But in particular, DiCola's one of the scant few who managed to make those synthesizers work just as effectively as an orchestra. I'd love to get some of the more obscure synth scores that work if anybody's got suggestions.
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