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So what monumentally classic film did you only just watch now you witless imbecile? - Page 45

post #2201 of 2257

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane. 

 

I'm now thinking of watching more Bette Davis and Joan Crawford films. 

post #2202 of 2257

Spoil me, what happened to Baby Jane? Or is it one of those "it's the journey, not the destination" type of deals?

post #2203 of 2257

She turns into a robot at the end.

post #2204 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by History Buff View Post
 

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane. 

 

I'm now thinking of watching more Bette Davis and Joan Crawford films. 

 

I'm tempted to say that the only essential Crawford film is Mildred Pierce.

post #2205 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

 

I'm tempted to say that the only essential Crawford film is Mildred Pierce.

I've heard great things about Daisy Kenyon, which just went up on Filmstruck. Crawford's a huge blind spot for me; I haven't even seen Mildred Pierce. Hoping to catch up on those this weekend.

 

Davis has several gems, but man, it's hard to top All About Eve.

post #2206 of 2257

Last night I watched Big Deal on Madonna Street, a 1958 parody of caper films such as Rififi. LOVED it, a genre satire which ends up being as good as the movies it's parodying (well, except for Rififi.) You don't have to have seen those movies to appreciate this one, though. It's superb, funny, and exciting when it counts.

 

This is currently on Filmstruck, which is a great resource for witless imbeciles who want to watch monumentally classic films.

post #2207 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

Last night I watched Big Deal on Madonna Street, a 1958 parody of caper films such as Rififi. LOVED it, a genre satire which ends up being as good as the movies it's parodying (well, except for Rififi.) You don't have to have seen those movies to appreciate this one, though. It's superb, funny, and exciting when it counts.

 

This is currently on Filmstruck, which is a great resource for witless imbeciles who want to watch monumentally classic films.


Great movie, oft-imitated but never duplicated.

 

I would love to see the sequel that was released the following year, FIASCO IN MILAN (most of the cast returned except for Marcello Mastroianni), but there is no DVD available with English subtitles.

post #2208 of 2257

Saw All About Eve. Smart and deliciously cynical, loved it!

post #2209 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post
 

Saw All About Eve. Smart and deliciously cynical, loved it!

George Sanders is incredible in that movie. "You have a point . . . an idiotic one, but it's a point."

post #2210 of 2257

Last night I watched:

 

Godard has always kept me at arm's length; I love his directorial invention and skill, but the films of his I've seen have felt more like intellectual exercises instead of movies . . . until I saw this. The cinematography and score are incredible, and the final shot is one of the best ever. It's so good that I want to revisit the other Godard movies to see what I was missing.

post #2211 of 2257
Does Trading Places count as a classic film. ?
post #2212 of 2257
Without a doubt.
post #2213 of 2257

Last night I watched:

 

 

First of all, OY that tagline.

This was incredibly slow and bleak and paranoid. I don't think I've seen a director's psyche completely bared like this since the last time I watched "The Room."

 

I then woke up and the first thing I see on CHUD is Polanski is in trouble yet again. Coming on the heels of watching this, I'm definitely not surprised.

post #2214 of 2257

 

As much as I love Lynch, this was too much even for me. It's amazing and exhausting, and I'll never sit through it again.

post #2215 of 2257

Caught my second Fellini, Amarcord. Seeing La Strada I sat down to consume some Serious Art was surprised by how warm and easy to like it was. This time I sat down to consume some Serious Art and was surprised by a parade of fart, dick, wank, arse, tit, and motorboating gags. With a scary nazi bit.

 

I will say though that the whole bit with the nutty uncle hiding in the tree, even though it was basically an extended comedy bit, was also one of the beautifully shot sequences I've ever seen, every frame a painting indeed. Whatever film stock they used must have been marinated in holy water.

 

I preferred La Strada overall because that was just a good solid story rather than fragmented little episodes, but I do appreciate the willingness in these (and a lot of Italian films I've seen actually) to try to evoke a whole range of emotions in one film. A lot of stuff I see can't even manage one.

post #2216 of 2257

Edit: Sorry, wrong thread. 


Edited by Engineer - 8/30/17 at 1:06pm
post #2217 of 2257
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

 

As much as I love Lynch, this was too much even for me. It's amazing and exhausting, and I'll never sit through it again.

 

This might sound like a dare, but I can tell you that I liked the film much more after watching the seventy minutes of deleted scenes on the 2-DVD set.   There were a few things that made more sense and you get much more of Laura Dern talking with the guy at Axxon N...

 

post #2218 of 2257

Twelve Angry Men

 

Stagey as all hell, but wonderfully written and acted. The scene where they all turn their backs sailed close to the cheesy wind, but these days I don't mind a little obvious. Clever use of dramatic irony with the weather building to a storm then breaking. The laser focus on the aim being reasonable doubt, not supplanting guilt for innocence would have been more clumsily handled in a lesser film. You could imagine the same film, but with the dynamic reversed and it would have been just as good.

 

Loved it. A classic deserving all the praise.

post #2219 of 2257

"Rotten kids, you work your life out!"

 

Lee J. Cobb was the goods.

post #2220 of 2257

Stealth MVP in that film: E.G. Marshall.

 

"Listen to me. Listen..."
"I have. Now sit down and don't open your mouth again."

 

Whole cast just kills it, though. Cobb is spectacular, agreed. It's one of the great ensemble films for sure.
 

post #2221 of 2257

So much of Fonda's acting is through his eyes. It's less showy a performance than some of the others, but it's a masterclass nonetheless. I also really like the way his character is manipulating them all from the beginning, claiming to simply having doubts and wanting to talk, but it all being obviously pre-meditated given he had bought the knife the night before. His little surreptitious glances of approval as various characters catch on to the gaps and weaknesses in the evidence are fun.

 

It's a textbook too on how to lead people to a conclusion versus hammering them about being wrong, as well as the effects of prejudice on thinking. Lessons we could all do with remembering.

post #2222 of 2257

I don't think I can ever get tired watching this movie. I actually think it's perfect.

post #2223 of 2257

Saw this last night:

 

So damn good, one of the best debut films I've seen. A mixture of Hitchcockian suspense, film noir and New Wave ennui. Great cinematography, a score by Miles Davis and Moreau is entrancing in her debut. SEE THIS.

post #2224 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

Saw this last night:



So damn good, one of the best debut films I've seen. A mixture of Hitchcockian suspense, film noir and New Wave ennui. Great cinematography, a score by Miles Davis and Moreau is entrancing in her debut. SEE THIS.

Watched this during Noirvember last year! Absolutely loved it. Added the soundtrack on Spotify to my "cooking mix".
post #2225 of 2257

Filmstruck posted a Godard series of 13 films, pretty much all of his classic films save for Band of Outsiders (which I haven't seen). Tonight I watched:

 

 

This was maybe the most accessible Godard I've seen, although I think I'll always find his work alternately dated, timeless and baffling, often within the same scene.

 

I looked up Roger Ebert's 1966 review of "Pierrot Le Fou," and his early summation of Godard is apt:
 

Quote:
One of Godard's films, seen by itself, can be a frustrating and puzzling experience. But when you begin to get into his universe, when you've seen a lot of Godard, you find yourself liking him more and more. One day something clicks, and Godard comes together. And then, perhaps, you decide that if he is not the greatest living director he is certainly the most audacious, the most experimental, the one who understands best how movies work.

Having caught up with this, Alphaville and Contempt in recent weeks, that Stockholm Syndrome has definitely set in for me. I admire Godard much more having watched these 3 films (I think PLF and Contempt are easily my favorites of his), but I can't say I want to see his films again, although the score of Contempt still rings in my head. His 60s work is simultaneously dated and still innovative. Even as his characters are ruing the Algerian occupation, there are cinematographic, editing and sound moments which literally changed film language.

post #2226 of 2257

Just saw A Face in the Crowd for the first time, on the big screen w/ a full house of really jazzed film fans who were into it from the get-go. Huge laughs and genuine, earned applause (When Marcia screams at him to jump out of everyone's lives, the theater erupted). Just an amazingly well-crafted film full of terrific performances and sharp writing that holds up today.

But man. Holy fucking motherfucking shit, Andy Griffith. What an awesome, electrifying villain performance he gives here. You cannot take your eyes off Lonesome Rhodes for a second - just a torrent of energy and charisma and arrogance. There's definitely some 50s gilding the lily (the sound dude saying "Boy, if only they could really hear him!" or whatever right before conveniently walking away was pretty goofy), but overall a tremendous - and tremendously entertaining - film.

post #2227 of 2257

And tonight's first-time viewing, again on the big screen: The Red Shoes. What a positively ravishing visual feast. It reminded me of nothing so much as Cocteau's La belle et la bete, and indeed seems to operate on a similar kind of primal, fairy tale logic. Certainly, if one were to look logically at that magnificent ballet sequence, there's no way most of that could be "real", but it works, as an invocation of the heightened state of imagination at which one must engage with a great work of of art.

 

Walbrook and Shearer are sublime. Walbrook makes for a marvelous devil figure - functioning almost like Iago with a fundamentally unknowable motive. No mere lust drives him, or mere ambition either - it feels like a creative appetite which could devour the world. Shearer, by contrast, is pure innocence, the cloud/flower/bird which Craster invokes as the image of divine beauty. The tension between them is what gives the film its power. Goring's Craster must play the straight man, which is interesting because the character's a great artist in his own right. Well, even an artist can be a boor outside his work.

 

Powell and Pressberger are at the height of their cinematic powers here, as the business and mundane process of creating art transcends into the highest and inevitably tragic form of that art. The cinematography and art direction are all-time achievements. Jack Cardiff is one of the greats, and his work in the ballet sequence is an astonishment to behold. It achieves that pure "cinema as dream" state. We all know even then it must crash down to Earth, and disastrously so. And yet, in the moment of genesis, time seems to stop, and the red shoes go on dancing to doom.

post #2228 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

And tonight's first-time viewing, again on the big screen: The Red Shoes. What a positively ravishing visual feast. It reminded me of nothing so much as Cocteau's La belle et la bete, and indeed seems to operate on a similar kind of primal, fairy tale logic. Certainly, if one were to look logically at that magnificent ballet sequence, there's no way most of that could be "real", but it works, as an invocation of the heightened state of imagination at which one must engage with a great work of of art.

 

Walbrook and Shearer are sublime. Walbrook makes for a marvelous devil figure - functioning almost like Iago with a fundamentally unknowable motive. No mere lust drives him, or mere ambition either - it feels like a creative appetite which could devour the world. Shearer, by contrast, is pure innocence, the cloud/flower/bird which Craster invokes as the image of divine beauty. The tension between them is what gives the film its power. Goring's Craster must play the straight man, which is interesting because the character's a great artist in his own right. Well, even an artist can be a boor outside his work.

 

Powell and Pressberger are at the height of their cinematic powers here, as the business and mundane process of creating art transcends into the highest and inevitably tragic form of that art. The cinematography and art direction are all-time achievements. Jack Cardiff is one of the greats, and his work in the ballet sequence is an astonishment to behold. It achieves that pure "cinema as dream" state. We all know even then it must crash down to Earth, and disastrously so. And yet, in the moment of genesis, time seems to stop, and the red shoes go on dancing to doom.

 

It's a rarer cut, leans slightly more into camp, and is lighter and not quite as transcendent as The Red Shoes or La belle et la bete, but you might want to check out "Tales of Hoffman". It's their screen adaptation of the Offenbach opera, with a cast including Moira Shearer, but with their voices dubbed by professional opera singers and an orchestra conducted by Thomas Beecham. It's of a piece, if not quite as amazing, and definitely worth a watch.


Edited by jhp1608 - 9/23/17 at 12:23am
post #2229 of 2257
Face in the Crowd and The Red Shoes are both wonderful. Face in the Crowd didn't seem dated...until late last year.
 
I saw Red Shoes in theaters when I was very young, would love that experience again. The Criterion is gorgeous. 
post #2230 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post
 

 

It's a rarer cut, leans slightly more into camp, and is lighter and not quite as transcendent as The Red Shoes or La belle et la bete, but you might want to check out "Tales of Hoffman". It's their screen adaptation of the Offenbach opera, with a cast including Moira Shearer, but with their voices dubbed by professional opera singers and an orchestra conducted by Thomas Beecham. It's of a piece, if not quite as amazing, and definitely worth a watch.

I'll have to look into that, thanks. Haven't seen too many Powell/Pressburger films, but between Colonel Blimp and The Red Shoes (and Powell's Thief of Bagdad), they're remarkable filmmakers.

post #2231 of 2257
"A Matter of Life and Death" can easily be read as cheese, but it's a beautiful, thoughtful film . Their wartime thriller efforts are very dated and not great.
post #2232 of 2257

Watching Peeping Tom is like finding the Rosetta Stone for the great movies. Everything from Mario Bava to Taxi Driver to Halloween is in it.

post #2233 of 2257

Ball of Fire​. I mean, it's a Howard Hawks screwball comedy co-written by Billy Wilder, with Barbara Stanwyck and a great collection of character actors. It does not disappoint, and it has me thinking that I've never given Gary Cooper a fair shot. I've always seen him as having a kind of stiffness, but that really becomes part of his appeal here.

post #2234 of 2257

People forget that Cooper's romantic comedy bona fides were solid from the start. I recommend following up with Design For Living.

post #2235 of 2257
Somebody convince me I need to sit through 8 1/2 (the Fellini one).
post #2236 of 2257
I've tried Fellini. Even in my film school days when I watched everything and tried to educate myself and have a formulated opinion on the classics.

And I say this: meh.
post #2237 of 2257
To the bottom of the list with ye, Fellini.

I ended up watching The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, shorter Director's Cut version.

Great movie. There's a lot to unpack there. It felt like it influenced some of Paul Greengrass and Michael Mann's style.

Strip clubs in the 70s seemed particularly nightmarish.
post #2238 of 2257

The White Sheik is my favorite Fellini. It's light and charming, with just enough acknowledgment of the post-war era. Julietta Masina steals it.

post #2239 of 2257

All The President's Men

 

That was fantastic. Hoffman and Redford are so good together and play off of each other incredibly well. My favourite performance though, probably belongs to Jason Robards as Ben Bradlee. He's just a joy to watch; "Fuck it, let's stand by the boys."

 

The cinematography is outstanding as well and some of the shot compositions were just riveting. A great movie to watch if politics are getting you down. 

post #2240 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post
 

All The President's Men

 

That was fantastic. Hoffman and Redford are so good together and play off of each other incredibly well. My favourite performance though, probably belongs to Jason Robards as Ben Bradlee. He's just a joy to watch; "Fuck it, let's stand by the boys."

 

The cinematography is outstanding as well and some of the shot compositions were just riveting. A great movie to watch if politics are getting you down. 

 

Robards all the way.  He absolutely steals the movie.

 

You should watch THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR now.  Another excellent Redford movie that'll keep your whole conspiracy vibe going.

post #2241 of 2257

And "The Candidate."

post #2242 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post

To the bottom of the list with ye, Fellini.

I ended up watching The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, shorter Director's Cut version.

Great movie. There's a lot to unpack there. It felt like it influenced some of Paul Greengrass and Michael Mann's style.

Strip clubs in the 70s seemed particularly nightmarish.

First of all, 8 1/2 is great. Y'all are drunk.

 

Second, I watched Killing of a Chinese Bookie for the first time a couple of days ago, and it's my least favorite Cassavetes I've seen so far. Gazzara's great, but I found the scenes set inside the world's most pretentious and depressing strip club to be pretty excruciating.

 

The day before, I watched Cassavetes' Opening Night, which is long and strange and great. I really like that, Woman Under The Influence and Love Streams.

post #2243 of 2257
I had to write a paper on "8 1/2" in film college.
post #2244 of 2257

Sorcerer - Borrowed the Blu-Ray from a friend, inspired by Empire's interview with Friedkin this month about it. Man this was a gritty film. Beautiful scenery, some amazing practical stunts and tense as hell. I've not seen Wages of Fear in a long, long time, but I think I prefer this. Possibly it's my leaning towards 70's American cinema, which always feels like it's both polished and auteur... a perfect mix before the blockbusters came on and pushed the polish over the vision.

post #2245 of 2257
Sorcerer was definitely the end of an era.
post #2246 of 2257

Watched My Favorite Year last night. Not to throw shade on Sir Ben Kingsley (too late?) who pulled off quite the feat with Gandhi. But how he bested Peter O'Toole at that year's Oscars is beyond me. This seems like one of those films that was just as fun to make as it is to watch.

post #2247 of 2257

O'Toole probably would have had a better chance running for Supporting Actor. 1982's Best Actor should by rights have gone to Dustin Hoffman for Tootsie.

 

But yes, My Favorite Year is a delightful film.

post #2248 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

First of all, 8 1/2 is great. Y'all are drunk.

Second, I watched Killing of a Chinese Bookie for the first time a couple of days ago, and it's my least favorite Cassavetes I've seen so far. Gazzara's great, but I found the scenes set inside the world's most pretentious and depressing strip club to be pretty excruciating.

The day before, I watched Cassavetes' Opening Night, which is long and strange and great. I really like that, Woman Under The Influence and Love Streams.


Which version of Chinese Bookie did you watch? I heard the longer one has even more excruciating strip club musicals. I'm good with the shorter DC.
post #2249 of 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post

Which version of Chinese Bookie did you watch? I heard the longer one has even more excruciating strip club musicals. I'm good with the shorter DC.

I watched the shorter version. I thought I'd check out the longer version if I liked the DC, but...no. However, the longer version does have the inspiration for that Imaginationland character on South Park - https://www.rogerebert.com/letters/most-obscure-film-reference-of-all-time

post #2250 of 2257

MY FAVORITE YEAR is a delightful movie.  Always nice to see new people discover it.

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