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So what monumentally classic film did you only just watch now you witless imbecile? - Page 46

post #2251 of 2395

Finally completed the George Lucas filmography with American Graffiti.

 

In retrospect it's interesting this was a megahit, because nowadays it plays a lot more like the kind of leisurely Linklater indie that would make about $3m. I'm guessing that back then 50's americana hadn't been immortalised in pop culture to same the extent it is now, so revisiting all these great songs and imagery in the Vietnam era felt fresh and a nice escape (though they still couldn't resist shoehorning in the customary 70's downer ending). The fact it's actually set in the 60's, despite having almost nothing to do with what we now think of as 60's, would sort of back up that on an iconic level these things hadn't fully crystalised yet.

 

Either way it's a million miles from the tight plotting of Star Wars, and I suspect that might have something to do with why the film doesn't seem to be so widely watched these days.

 

Even though it's one of his more successful films it's not necessarily a great defense against accusations that Lucas is perhaps not the most gifted director on the planet, because it's a pretty ugly looking film! Most of it is grainy shots of people stood against a pitch black background. 99% of the visual appeal is in the cars and some of the clothes.

 

Languid pacing aside it's still pretty good though. Good characters, good cars, great music, youthful good time vibes! Curious to see actual red blooded horniness in a George Lucas film.

 

If Lucas didn't get a cut of the profits from Happy Days he should've sued because, aside from Ron Howard being a skeevy date rapist, it's almost shameful how much was a direct rip.

 

I was also trying to figure out if any of the characters was the Lucas surrogate. Toad probably? Speccy dork makes good.

post #2252 of 2395

Before he was king of the nerds he was a gearhead, so somewhere between Toad and John (the Paul Le Mat character).

 

Wolfman Jack is totally a proto-Yoda.

post #2253 of 2395
Tonight I watched ARSENIC AND OLD LACE, a pretty massive gap for me in both the Cary Grant and Frank Capra pantheons. This turned out to be right up my alley. Grant's in his screwball prime in this one, and Peter Lorre is always a credit to any movie in which he appears. It's perhaps a little too long, but otherwise it's a classic for a reason.
post #2254 of 2395
Oh yes, Arsenic is an all-time classic.
post #2255 of 2395

It's a shame Karloff couldn't do the film and they had to change the last line for the censors, but yeah, it's a hoot. Just one incredible line after another.

 

"Insanity runs in my family. It practically gallops."

post #2256 of 2395

I do Grant's frustrated whinny whenever I'm actually frustrated by something.

post #2257 of 2395

​Arsenic​ is a lot of fun. I love seeing Grant in roles that give him opportunities revisit his knockabout roots.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

It's a shame Karloff couldn't do the film and they had to change the last line for the censors, but yeah, it's a hoot. Just one incredible line after another.

 

"Insanity runs in my family. It practically gallops."


​Yes, this will always be my one problem with the movie. Massey's performance is fine, but he'll always feel like a placeholder for the genuine article. Fortunately, Karloff was in a radio version that's available through various outlets.

post #2258 of 2395

After having read the book about a year ago, I watched the Russian (Oscar winning) version of War and Peace recently and goddamn are there some EPIC fucking battles in this.  Seriously, there are some amazing shots in this movie with hundreds(thousands?) of people.  Also, there is some really impressive camera work for it's time.  Trying to find one of the final battle scenes online, but can't seem to find it.  Honestly, I am surprised this movie is not talked about more often.  It really is a monumental achievement.  You can get a taste of it in the clip below, but it doesn't really do it justice unless you have watched the 7(!) hours of the film.

 

One other thing that really impressed me, especially, in the final battle and burning of Moscow.  Holy fucking shit (!!!) is there a massive amount of fire and explosions in this.  It's insane.  Makes CGI look so worthless.  I mean there is so much destruction and carnage that I started laughing at one point because I couldn't believe they pulled this off on such a massive scale, and with such precision and artistry.  It really blew my mind.

 

 

On a side note, I vaguely remember George Lucas saying the battle on Naboo in Episode I was influenced by this movie, and well, I can see the similarity, kind of, but his version is simply a joke compared to this.

post #2259 of 2395

Bondarchuk had five infantry divisions plus a cavalry division at his disposal. I can't even imagine the costuming requirements.

post #2260 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Bondarchuk had five infantry divisions plus a cavalry division at his disposal. I can't even imagine the costuming requirements.


From the looks of it, he put all of them to good use.

 

Speaking of costuming requirements, I saw the new Russian movie Matilda in the theater a few days ago(my wife speaks Russian and dragged me to it) and it was a pretty good movie.  Pretty well made. Very polished, looked great, and it has an awesome train crash sequence.  That being said, it's kind of fairly standard storyline, nothing to get worked up about, although it was heavily protested in Russia for being "blasphemous" to the church.  Most people not aware of the controversy would find the story rather quaint.  Anyways, at the end of the movie, for some reason text shows up that says there were over 5000 costumes created for the movie, but frankly, I did not see it on screen.  While it does have a few "epic" flourishes, it really isn't a "big" movie.

 

Trailer, if anyone is curious.  Warning, this does contain some brief nudity so NSFW:

 

 

 

 

Now, War and Peace, I believe that bit of costuming would have taken an amazing amount of effort.  I mean there are just seas of people everywhere. There is a making of doc on the DVD I have, so I might need to check that out at some point.

 

Everyone talks about Tarkovsky, and rightfully so, but I am really surprised that, until I saw this, I had never heard of Bondarchuk. 

post #2261 of 2395

Do you have the RusCiCo set? The best bit in the documentary is on-set footage of the burning-city sequence, where they're just pushing the camera through real flames.

post #2262 of 2395

Bondarchuk achieved similar scale with Waterloo. Here's a sharp, if gimmicky, appreciation. There are good clips from W&P in here too.

 

 

post #2263 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Do you have the RusCiCo set? The best bit in the documentary is on-set footage of the burning-city sequence, where they're just pushing the camera through real flames.

 

I do!  Sounds awesome.  Will definitely have to check it out.  I actually bought that version (and I would assume you might have too) because I read online that it was the only DVD that had the true aspect ratio of the film.  Glad I checked that out first as I blind bought it since it's not on Netflix DVD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Bondarchuk achieved similar scale with Waterloo. Here's a sharp, if gimmicky, appreciation. There are good clips from W&P in here too.

 

 

 

Russians really loved Napoleon. haha. Didn't know he did this.  Definitely going to have to give this a look.  Thanks for the tip!

post #2264 of 2395

Ikiru.

 

Masterpiece. I mean, what else is there even to say? Masterpiece.

post #2265 of 2395

Via TCM tonight, Charade. It is very good and thankfully I knew none of its many twists & turns beforehand. Besides a quality main cast going through a Hitchcockian tale, there was a nice Henry Mancini score and those opening titles from Henry Mancini. The biggest highlight for me was the tremendous dialogue and interplay between Grant and Hepburn.

post #2266 of 2395
Yeah, Grant is absolutely rocking the hell out of his easygoing charisma in that film.
post #2267 of 2395

The Magnificent Seven

 

Been putting off watching this for years.  Not because I didn't want to see it, but because I knew it was based on Seven Samurai, a movie, I hate to admit, I fell asleep watching years ago and had to return it to the video store before I could watch the ending.  I watched maybe 2/3 or 3/4 of it and have been meaning to watch it again ever since, but never did.  The reason I never went back to it was, partially because **gasp!** I thought Seven Samurai was kind of boring, tbh.  Now that may have something to do with me being almost 20 years younger, but I specifically rented it the first time because I knew it was a classic and was very interested in seeing it, but it just seemed so stiff and static to me at the time.  I don't know, I will watch it again someday, I just haven't been able to muster the interest.

 

That being said, this movie is fantastic.  Watching it on Blu-ray it looked so fresh and clean. I'm guessing this was a remastered version, but, damn, everything just looked amazing.  Whose needs digital grading when you can have a movie that looks like this?  Not to say that movies back then didn't have stylistic flourishes of their own, but it's great to see "real" colors and not something that was clearly altered by a computer in post-production to cover up how shitty it actually looks.  I really dug the fact that the "heroes" are, for the most part, good people, but that they also are conflicted about the fact that they have basically ruined their lives by the way they choose to live.  The only thing that was a little jarring was the fact that the Mexican villagers all speak English a little too well, and many barely have any kind of an accent, but, whatever, it's just a great movie.  So many great actors, sets, and dialogue.

 

Maybe I need to check out the original Seven Samurai again, sooner rather than later...

post #2268 of 2395

I'm not sure it's a monumentally classic film, but I am watching The Straight Story for the first time (finally) and maybe it's the quality of the recording, but this looks atrocious. It's filmed like a Sunday morning Lifetime movie from the 80s. I'm super puzzled by the acclaim I've read that it's beautifully shot. The wide shots are decent, but the lighting is bizarre, the cutaway shots are very amateur looking, and the way the camera moves in close-ups is throwing me off big time. Performances seem top notch though.

 

ETA: It looks like a student film.

post #2269 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

I'm not sure it's a monumentally classic film, but I am watching The Straight Story for the first time (finally) and maybe it's the quality of the recording, but this looks atrocious. It's filmed like a Sunday morning Lifetime movie from the 80s. I'm super puzzled by the acclaim I've read that it's beautifully shot. The wide shots are decent, but the lighting is bizarre, the cutaway shots are very amateur looking, and the way the camera moves in close-ups is throwing me off big time. Performances seem top notch though.

 

ETA: It looks like a student film.


I only saw it once, but I don't remember it being anything special in terms of cinematography.  That being said, I remember really liking it, and I absolutely love the way it ends, which I won't spoil. 

post #2270 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post

 

Maybe I need to check out the original Seven Samurai again, sooner rather than later...

 

Yes. 

 

Yes you should. 

post #2271 of 2395

The mundane plainness of Straight Story's look was quite eerie to me, in a completely different way than any other Lynch film.

 

It was very good, but one viewing was enough.

post #2272 of 2395

RCA was right. The end is aces. It's a surprisingly fast paced movie for most of the run time. Glad I've finally seen it, but time has not been kind. Farnsworth was pretty great.

 

Time for first two Godfathers now. Yeah. I know.

post #2273 of 2395

I've crossed a few more Hitchcock films off of my 'haven't seen' list in the past week or so.

 

DIAL M FOR MURDER: Excellent from beginning to end.

MARNIE: Well acted but I didn't really care for it.  Great to see Sean Connery looking like Bond but doing something completely different.

THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (second version): Excellent but kinda slow.  It also had some serious credibility issues towards the end (with Stewart running around a foreign embassy without security going berzerk, for example).

 

Of the three I'd definitely opt to watch DIAL M FOR MURDER again.

post #2274 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post

 

Maybe I need to check out the original Seven Samurai again, sooner rather than later...

 

 

If Empire Strikes Back is my favorite movie, then Seven Samurai is my second. I remember the first time I saw it, as a kid up all night with the flu, watching Turner Classic Movies or something on the couch. Seven Samurai came on, and I was like "fuck yeah, I'll watch a kung fu movie". It wasn't that at all, but what it ended up being was even better. It was slow, methodical, a master class in storytelling and much of what Kurosawa did with the film, visually, ended up just being the language for modern cinema. Much of the film - aside from being black and white and grainy - looks like it could've been shot today.

 

I might have a soft spot for it because of how it caught me off guard - hell, at that age I'd never seen a movie with an intermission. Whatever network it was on ran it uncut with no commercials. But holy shit, it's Citizen Kane in terms of the skill, craft and care on display, and just as much for the massive influence it's had, since.

 

Go watch it, and give it a little patience. You will be rewarded, tenfold.

post #2275 of 2395

SEVEN SAMURAI is the goods.  

 

Side note: I showed it to my wife a few years ago.  She'd never seen a Kurosawa movie, so I figured I'd go 'all in' and show her the cream of the crop.  She raved about it once it was done, and we ended up binge watching RASHOMAN, YOJIMBO, SANJURO, and HIGH & LOW in the week or so that followed.  I'm always incredibly pleased when she sees a classic film and immediately appreciates it.

post #2276 of 2395

I watched Seven Samurai for the first time on Bravo (!) a couple of days before starting film school. I then spent a few hours wondering why I should even bother going to film school because how in the hell could I top that?

 

Kurosawa's so, so great, although most of his movies are definitely on the epic side; There's an interview with Bill Hader on Filmstruck where he talks about showing Kurosawa to his girlfriend. He intro'd them by saying "We're going to watch these...they are great, and they are long." 

post #2277 of 2395
Seven Samurai is almost too good. So much better than The Insignificant Seven.

And it's only my THIRD fave Kurosawa!
post #2278 of 2395
The Straight Story is a perfectly good looking film! I won’t hear a word said against it.

Dial M I remember finding a bit too stagey aside from the excellent central set piece. I’m ready to give it another other go though. Man Who Knew v2 is breezy and pleasant but I wouldn’t call it a favourite either.

Marnie I see as top shelf Hitchcock. He’s got his dream team behind the camera (for the last time), and it’s dreamy and lush and screwed in the head in that particular way of his. One of his most interesting movies I think.
post #2279 of 2395

I'll defend THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (original version, anyways) until my dying day.  It's a blast and manages to do its own thing with the same premise.  It's not as good as SEVEN SAMURAI, but honestly...what IS?

post #2280 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post

Marnie I see as top shelf Hitchcock. He’s got his dream team behind the camera (for the last time), and it’s dreamy and lush and screwed in the head in that particular way of his. One of his most interesting movies I think.

 

In terms of acting and direction, it's absolutely top shelf.  I just found the plot itself rather unbelievable and, to be frank, repulsive.

post #2281 of 2395
I've yet to see the new Denzel/Chris Pratt version..
post #2282 of 2395
I saw The Magnificent Seven 2016 remake. It's a movie!
post #2283 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I've yet to see the new Denzel/Chris Pratt version..


It's been sitting in my Amazon Prime queue for months. Maybe I'll watch it one day. I have too many monumentally classic films to watch first.

post #2284 of 2395
High praise indeed!
post #2285 of 2395
The shots were in focus, the actors remembered their lines, no camera equipment or crew members were visible.

A+
post #2286 of 2395

I had the new M7 on my DVR to watch at one point, but the DVR took a dump and I had to get a new one.  I haven't exactly stressed out about losing it.

post #2287 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

the actors remembered their lines

How do you know?!

post #2288 of 2395
Holy shit, M7 killed Judas' DVR!
post #2289 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

RCA was right. The end is aces. It's a surprisingly fast paced movie for most of the run time. Glad I've finally seen it, but time has not been kind. Farnsworth was pretty great.

 

Time for first two Godfathers now. Yeah. I know.

 

Whoah. For the first time?

 

Wish I could go back in time and do that again.

post #2290 of 2395

I hope that your experience with GF1 and 2 matches my wife's.  She was awestruck.

post #2291 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

I'll defend THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (original version, anyways) until my dying day.  It's a blast and manages to do its own thing with the same premise.  It's not as good as SEVEN SAMURAI, but honestly...what IS?

 

It's a really good film, but nothing quite tops the first time Chris and Vin team up on the hearse. 

post #2292 of 2395

Yep. Many years ago I tried to watch the first one a half a dozen times and could not get into it. Since then, the opportunity has never really come up. Now that Netflix has it again, I am making it my goal. If I understand correctly, the third can piss off.

post #2293 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

Yep. Many years ago I tried to watch the first one a half a dozen times and could not get into it. Since then, the opportunity has never really come up. Now that Netflix has it again, I am making it my goal. If I understand correctly, the third can piss off.

 

The third is OK.  It's a mixed bag and worth a watch, just lower your expectations after finishing the first two.

post #2294 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

Yep. Many years ago I tried to watch the first one a half a dozen times and could not get into it. Since then, the opportunity has never really come up. Now that Netflix has it again, I am making it my goal. If I understand correctly, the third can piss off.

 

I'm a defender of the third, but there are a few scenes where Coppola's ewrstwhile ability to correctly calibrate operatic moments had clearly left him, and things descend into self-parody. It's also shot like a TV movie and trades George Hamilton for Robert Duvall and Sofia Coppola for Diane Keaton. Other than the few scenes Francis loses a grip on, Pacino is still fucking excellent and much of the supporting cast do well. The other main issue is that it treats certain set pieces as "Godfather" moments, much like a franchise sequel of the old school.

 

Saying that, though, even if it is for Pacino and Garcia alone, it's not a waste of time.

 

Fuck, you're about to watch my favourite six hours and change on film. Really hope you like them.

post #2295 of 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

I just found the plot itself rather unbelievable and, to be frank, repulsive.

All part of its twisted appeal! It gets wronger every year but I don’t think Hitch was under any illusions about what he was up to. He knew what he was doing when he thrusts Connery’s leering face at the audience.
post #2296 of 2395
First time I watched the Seven Samurai was in 2006. I took a fuckit day from work so I started watching it around 5:45am...about the time I'd have been clocking in. Which....if I'm not working is my favorite time of day. Very early morning. Had bought it on a whim due to it's reputation and the first feeling I was hit with was that so far it just gave me a huge swell of joy to watch it unfold. It was just SOOOO entertaining and wonderful and there was SO MUCH OF IT. I love long movies. It's that same kind of pure, spirit lifting, type of film like Jaws or Raiders.

TL;DR
Seven Samurai is incredible and everyone with functioning eyeballs should own it..
post #2297 of 2395
I watched "Godfather, Part III" once when I was in film school. It's definitely the "Two Jakes" of Godfather sequels.
post #2298 of 2395
Real talk....the first time I finally got around to watching Godfather III in it's entirety....I didn't think Sofia Coppola's performance was all that bad in it. Still don't. Bland, yeah but I guess the years of hearing how awful she was supposed to be in it made me expect some Ed Wood shit or something. If Godfather III has to be compared to something....I'd go with Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Especially given my recent change of opinion on that movie..
post #2299 of 2395
Oh, she's Tommy Wiseau bad.
post #2300 of 2395
I guess I need to watch it again..
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