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Doctor Who - Page 9

post #401 of 412

Watched Remembrance of the Daleks after Thanksgiving Feasting. 
 

I'm not a big fan of that era of Who, but I really liked this serial. Sylvester McCoy's Doctor returns to the school where he and Susan the first Companions in 1962.

 

The Daleks are there too, searching for a Power Object that Doctor One hid (exceedingly poorly). In fact there are two Dalek factions, one headed by a Super intelligent school girl (!) and one headed by Davros. (the Davros reveal is weirdly off hand, even prefunctry). 

 

There's an army/intel presense as well, with a Proto-Brigadier (He's just a Group Captain) and a female Scientific Advisor. Neither really play much of a part in the story. 

 

One reason I fell out of Dr Who was they made him a Secret Ruler Of The Universe. Here he The Hand of Omega: a device that's like a Death Star except it's smaller than a coffin (which is where The Doctor hides it) and is also sentient. The Doctor decides to let the Daleks get the Hand, having programmed it to destroy Skaro's sun (at some unspecified time in the future) then the Dalek Battleship (after Davros escapes). The exact same plot happens in Silver Nemesis only with Cybermen. 


So we're to believe that in every previous story The Doctor feigned not already knowing about Daleks (and Cybermen), also only pretended to be threatened by them (plus having the off Companion killed by them), when all along he could have destroyed all of them. Blah. 

 

Still, it was a pleasant two hours, I really liked McCoy and Sophie Alred as Ace, and the production values are pretty good, esp for Who.

post #402 of 412

Continued my Classic Whoathon with a viewing of Tomb of the Cybermen.

 

Must say I'm not impressed. Troughton is a delight (esp his little pun at the end that makes Jaimie groan), but the suspense is non existent despite the casts best efforts (which consist of shouting and scrabbling about when all they need do is climb a ladder). 

 

This also shows the problem with the Cybermen: they are dumb as bricks. They should be called Brick Head Men. 

 

So the Cybermen construct a "Tomb" with the expectation that someday humans will find it and resurrect them. So they litter the tomb with math puzzles and one (1) death trap so the unsuspecting humans will fall for it. 

 

Then they build a tomb with ONLY ONCE ENTRANCE! How fucking hard would it be to construct a second entrance or several so they won't be trapped in their own tomb?! 

 

It doesn't help that the Cyber Leader looks like a walking dildo. 

 

On the positive side, this story is the template for numerous Cybermen stories to come (the human partially turned Cyberman who revolts, the "you will become like us" line, etc.)

 

I'll take the Colin Baker serial Attack of the Cyberman, or the Troughton story The Invasion over this. 

post #403 of 412

I saw Tomb of the Cybermen recently and (like you) found that it didn't hold up. I prefer The Moonbase, which also has silly and nonsensical writing but also some great Troughton moments -- his "They must be fought" speech still raises goosebumps -- and better pacing.

 

However, Tomb of the Cybermen has at least two wonderful scenes. The first is a bit of classic Doctor/Jamie comic business. Starts at 2:40:

 

 

The second is the Doctor's conversation with Victoria about her father:

 

 

post #404 of 412

^ Agree on those scenes.

 

So, just watched Masque of Mandragora, and my God, we are in Prime Who here. 

 

This is a Tom Baker story and the budgets are orders of magnitude greater than the Troughton era. 

 

The TARDIS is drawn into the Mandragora Helix, where it's infiltrated by Mandragora energy, then forced to land in 15th century Italy. 

 

There the Doctor and Sarah meet a ruthless and ambitious Count, the Nephew who's into Science (as understood at the time), and an evil Astrologer. 

 

Said Astrologer had previously been contacted by the Helix and had revived an ancient Roman cult to serve/be receptacles.

 

It's been a while since I've seen a Tom Baker Who and the thing that really leaps out (literally) is how much his Doctor is a man of action. 

 

He doesn't just stand there and wave his omnipotent Sonic Screwdriver or yell about how awesome he is; when threatened by a squad of horse mounted soldiers, he whips out a Whiz bang toy to scare the horses, then steals one of the horses and rides off. Later on he delivers a drop kick to another guard which would make Van Damme proud. 

 

This story was filmed in the same Welsh resort that The Prisoner was filmed in. If I ever get back to the UK this place is on my must visit list. 

 

The production team does a good job of making the Welsh resort look like 15th century Italy (couldn't manage the shrubbery which was quite British), and they do a really nice optical effect when the Helix "resurrects" an ancient Roman temple.

 

The story is a nice tight 4 show serial, Sarah gets to try to murder the Doctor, we begin to see how big the inside of the TARDIS is, and The Doctor reveals that he's been telepathically helping his Companions understand the local languages (even when they are separated ) all this time. Obviously also sharing that gift with the audience. 

 

All in all, this show is what CHUD's Mr. Saxon would call "a cracking good time!"


Edited by Cylon Baby - 11/28/17 at 5:14pm
post #405 of 412

Oh and yes, the "Brotherhood" of cultists do in fact do the the Hokey Pokey during their ritual.

 

It seems the Hokey Pokey was a popular choice in depicting cults and Satanists on TV and Film, it's also noted in a recent RedLetterMedia Best of the Worst. 

post #406 of 412

The Masque of Mandragora and Underworld are the only Tom Baker stories I've never seen.

post #407 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cylon Baby View Post

Oh and yes, the "Brotherhood" of cultists do in fact do the the Hokey Pokey during their ritual.

It seems the Hokey Pokey was a popular choice in depicting cults and Satanists on TV and Film, it's also noted in a recent RedLetterMedia Best of the Worst. 

I can't imagine Satanists not dancing like white people in real life.
post #408 of 412

For my shame, I've never watched Masque of Mandragora (although - oddly - I've read the novelisation). I keep meaning to rectify that, and it certainly sounds like it would be worth my time. 

post #409 of 412

Forgot to mention that there is a really good short on the design of the TARDIS interior on the DVD Extras. 

 

Lots of really good insights (like that the color White was considered "Futuristic" in the 1960's, so Doctor One's control room has a bright white console plus white walls) and the new Who opted for a HR Geiger inspired organic structure. 

There's also a bizarre "comedy" short by some Fan boys who must have bribed the DVD producers with some cheap boxed red wine or rot gut liquor. Avoid. 

post #410 of 412

I've been listening to Big Finish's "Dark Eyes" series, and it's my introduction to Alex Macqueen's take on The Master.

 

I love this performance.  Macqueen's Master is brilliant, evil, and kinda goofy.  This is very much a Master that could exist in continuity with Michelle Gomez's superlative take on the character.

 

So, hey, Big Finish aficionados: which stories should I purchase for more Macqueen Master goodness?

post #411 of 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankCobretti View Post
 

I've been listening to Big Finish's "Dark Eyes" series, and it's my introduction to Alex Macqueen's take on The Master.

 

I love this performance.  Macqueen's Master is brilliant, evil, and kinda goofy.  This is very much a Master that could exist in continuity with Michelle Gomez's superlative take on the character.

 

So, hey, Big Finish aficionados: which stories should I purchase for more Macqueen Master goodness?

 

It took some time for me to "get" Macqueen's interpretation of the character, but after a second listen of Dark Eyes 2 and 3, I was fully onboard. He's particularly strong with the Eighth Doctor: Somehow the contrast between the two actors -- Macqueen overplaying opposite McGann's understated style -- works beautifully. This Master's highlight is arguably Matt Fitton's brilliant "Masterplan" (from Dark Eyes 3), which is mostly a two-hander where Eight and the Master are stuck on a spaceship and forced to work together. Great dialogue and performances.

 

I have not heard Macqueen's other appearances, but I'm told Vampire of the Mind and The Two Masters are well worth seeking out.

 

Another sadly underrated Master is Geoffrey Beevers, who played the character once on TV (The Keeper of Traken) and has continued to do amazing work for Big Finish. The Doctor he works best with (I think) is the Seventh, and I highly recommend Dust Breeding and Master.

post #412 of 412

Yes, "Masterplan" got me on board the MacQueen train.  I'll check out that "Master Trilogy," which begins with Vampire of the MInd.  

Oh, and I'll check out Dust Breeding and Master, as well.  I spend a lot of time in my car, so there you go.

 

Thanks for your advice!

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